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Course Continuity Plan

» Chapman University Course Continuity

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The following Quick Guide and drop-down resources can help faculty during remote instruction. You can also refer to the Canvas Instructor Guides and our Blackboard Step-by-Step Documentation for specific questions about our important teaching platforms, or sign up and join our online trainings.

Quick Guide for Remote Teaching During Interruption

Here is a step-by-step planning process. Read this list first; then, use the drop-down resources below to help you implement your plan.  You can also see up-to-date news on technologies and strategies at the Academics at Chapman blog or announcements at our ETS Facebook page. If you find there's a resource missing that you'd like to use, write to Educational Technology Services (edutech@chapman.edu) to help us add helpful resources. If you need tech support, write to servicedesk@chapman.edu

Step 1: Plan and Practice. Use the "Readiness Checklist" below to ask yourself important questions about your communication plan, your and your students' technological capabilities and bandwidth, and how your content and assignments will be delivered and received.

Step 2: Communication. Use the ideas from the "Maintaining Communication with Students" dropdown below to make sure communication stays open between you and your students during any interruption.

Step 3: Content Delivery. Use the "Sharing Content and Instructional Materials," "Creating Digital Content," and "Teaching Online with Accessibility in Mind" drop-down links below to consider the various ways your content can be created and delivered so all students can access it.

Step 4: Assessments. Use the "Creating Graded Assignments" dropdown below to find ways to maintain assessments and standards during remote instruction. Please also note that IETL has put together a document for Academic Integrity concerns.

Step 5: Engagement and Collaboration. Use the "Creating Online Collaboration," "Hosting Online Meetings," and "Fostering Student Engagement" dropdowns below to help create less distance in remote learning.

Please also note that some specialized instruction (lab, dance, film) requires specialized technologies (see "Consider Special Strategies for Specialized Instruction" below). For example, the library has great resources for specialized instruction for film and science.

Again, the more you can practice these in advance with your students, the more likely you and your students will be successful in maintaining the teaching and learning relationship during remote instruction.

Tools and Strategies for Remote Instruction

Strategically planning remote instruction will benefit all involved in the learning experience. Although the resources in this list may seem abundant, choose only those resources that will make instruction and learning simple for you and your students. The best starting point is whatever you already know how to use.

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Remote Teaching Readiness Checklist: Plan Ahead

Do you have a plan for possible personal, environmental, or other issues that may disrupt instruction? Planning ahead will save you and your students time and unnecessary stress. If the situation is immediate, keep instruction as simple as possible. Here is a planning checklist that will bring up important things to consider:

  1. How will you communicate with your students? (see possibilities below in "Maintaining Communication with Students")
  2. If students don't have access to your communication platform (for instance, if some don't have Internet access), is there an alternative form of communication available, such as cell phone communication (within FERPA guidelines of privacy and security)?
  3. If a student is sick or unable to access any communication, do you have an alternative plan for that student? If you are sick, do you have an alternative plan?
  4. How comfortable are you with technology? If you're not comfortable, keep your plan simple and stick to things you already know.
  5. Where will you post materials and assignments?
  6. Will you teach synchronously (through video conferences or other real-time collaboration platforms) or asynchronously (through posting content, discussions, assignments, quizzes such as on Canvas or Blackboard)? Consider personal and student bandwidth as you make this decision. Simplicity is best.
  7. Do your students know your plan for instruction and where and when to look for content and assignments?
  8. Do you need to be trained on any technology, and, if so, how will you receive the training? (Hint: Educational Technology Services, edutech@chapman.edu, has many great resources, and your Canvas dashboard already has a self-paced instructional course for you.)
  9. Will you need to change any of the expectations or assessments in the syllabus due to the circumstance and can you do so while maintaining the most optimal learning experience for the scenario?
  10. Have you communicated to your students any possible changes to requirements?
  11. How will you and your students stay in touch with your department and school? (E.g., Panther Alert? Phone tree?)
  12. Do you know how to download and back-up grades in a secure way?
  13. Have you practiced these items both for yourself and with your students?

Maintaining Communication with Students

Keeping communication lines open is the most important need for remote instruction. We highly recommend using your preferred Learning Management System (LMS, meaning Canvas or Blackboard) for this communication. Both LMS are already set up with your course and roster. We also recommend establishing a communication plan and even practicing the communication method before any disruption occurs so students know where to look and can verify that their information is up-to-date to receive institutional communication. Here are the ways to communicate through both of our current institutional LMS. If you use a different method, please make sure students know where to expect the communication in advance.

Canvas

How to send an announcement [Canvas Announcements Video]

How to message through the Canvas Inbox

How to use Canvas Chat [Canvas Chat Video]

Blackboard

How to send an announcement

How to send email through Blackboard

Other

Gather student contact information and communicate to students through phone, app, or messaging capability. If you choose this method, make sure to keep information confidential for students who don't want to share their contacts.

Sharing Content and Instructional Materials with Students

Information is the gateway to learning, so getting the information in a place where students can access it will be important. We highly recommend using a Learning Management System for organizing content (either Canvas or Blackboard). Here are the various ways you can share content:

Canvas

Adding files to Canvas: Any content, such as PowerPoint, Word documents, or PDFs, can be added to Canvas [Canvas Files Video]

Adding Modules and Organizing content through Modules in Canvas: Files and other content can be organized in Canvas through Modules

Adding hyperlinks to Canvas: Add hyperlinks to Canvas of content that already exists on the web (including information you may create on a Google document)

Blackboard

Adding files to Blackboard: Any content, such as PowerPoint, Word documents, or PDFs, can be added to Blackboard

Organizing content through folders in Blackboard: Blackboard uses menu and folder link nesting in order to organize information

Adding hyperlinks to Blackboard: Add hyperlinks to content that already exists on the web (including information you may create on a Google document)

Alternative methods of content-sharing

Google documents: Creating and sharing are easy through Google documents, which are available to all Chapman University faculty through their Chapman credentials. These can be sent through email or as a link (we recommend posting the link on your LMS)

Email, website creation, or other forms of content sharing are fine as long as students know where they should be looking for the content.

Creating Digital Content (PDFs, lectures, audio recordings)

Tools for creating PDFs

If you don't have a scanner readily available, there are several smart phone apps that create quality PDFs. Search your app store for well-rated scanning apps and post scanned documents in a place where students can find them (preferably Canvas or Blackboard). Microsoft Lens is available to Chapman instructors (Microsoft Lens on Apple; Microsoft Lens on Google Play) and can be access through Chapman credentials.

Various tools for recording lecture

Tools for recording lectures are abundant. Chapman University has a sitewide license for Panopto and Adobe (sign in through your institutional credentials). PowerPoint has its own internal recording capability.

Voice-Over-Powerpoint: Record an audio file narration with slides


Panopto Desktop Capture: Record desktop and audio files


Adobe Spark Video, Adobe Audition and Adobe Premiere Rush: Record video and audio


Other tools for creating content

Google documents: Creating and sharing are easy through Google documents, which are available to all Chapman University faculty through their Chapman credentials

Canvas Pages: Canvas has the internal capability of content creation through Pages [Canvas Pages Video]

Canvas hyperlinks: Add hyperlinks to Canvas of content that already exists on the web (including information you may create on a Google document)

Blackboard Items: Instead of adding files, Blackboard Items can be used to create text-based content

Blackboard hyperlinks: Add hyperlinks to content that already exists on the web (including information you may create on a Google document)

Creating Graded Assessments

It is helpful to maintain the ability to assess students even in remote environments. Luckily, Learning Management Systems (LMS, such as Canvas and Blackboard) are equipped with relatively robust assessment features and grading capabilities.

Some of you might even want to

Canvas

Creating assignments in Canvas: By creating assignments in an LMS, it is easy to keep track of the assignments and grade them

Creating graded discussions in Canvas: Graded discussions allow the benefit of both student collaboration and the ability to assess student work [Canvas Discussions Video]

Creating quizzes in Canvas: Quizzes allow easy comprehension checks, and some question types make it easy for the quiz to be self-graded [Canvas Quizzes Video]

Using Canvas SpeedGrader and Annotations: Canvas SpeedGrader facilitates easy grading, feedback, and communication of student grades [Canvas Gradebook Video] [Canvas SpeedGrader Video]

Turnitin Feedback Studio on Canvas: Some people like the ease and interface of Turnitin Feedback Studio, especially for longer essays or reports

Blackboard

Creating assignments in Blackboard: By creating assignments in an LMS, it is easy to keep track of the assignments and grade them

Creating graded discussions in Blackboard: Graded discussions allow the benefit of both student collaboration and the ability to assess student work

Creating tests in Blackboard: Quizzes allow easy comprehension checks, and some question types make it easy for the quiz to be self-graded

Creating graded journals in Blackboard: Blackboard has the ability for student journaling that can be graded

Using Blackboard Grade Center and Inline Grading: Blackboard Grade Center facilitates easy grading, feedback, and communication of student grades

Turnitin and GradeMark through Blackboard: Some people like the ease and interface of Turnitin Feedback Studio, especially for longer essays or reports

 

Creating Online Collaborations

Even in online environments, rich collaborations can take place. Chapman University has several tools to help with online collaborations. The following tools can be accessed by using Chapman credentials.

Office 365: Microsoft Office documents can be shared for collaboration

G Suite (such as GoogleDocs): Google documents can be shared for collaboration

Teams: Microsoft Teams can be accessed through Outlook where discussions, file-sharing, online conferences, and other interactions can take place

Adobe Spark: Spark pages can be used as collaborations

Canvas 

Canvas Discussion Forums: Discussion forums can keep students engaged and interacting with each other [Canvas Discussions Video]

Canvas Groups: Canvas groups are highly collaborative spaces in which students can create their own discussions, share files and pages, add announcements, etc. [Canvas Groups Video]

Canvas Conferences: Canvas conferences can be set up by both instructors and students to collaborate and interact [Canvas Conferences Video]

Blackboard

Blackboard Discussion Forums: Discussion forums can keep students engaged and interacting with each other for a deeper learning experience

Blackboard Groups: Blackboard groups are spaces in which groups of students can collaborate on documents and add files.

Hosting Online Meetings/Conferences

To hold an online meeting, there are several tools available to you. These tools will work best with a computer that has a camera and microphone, but these platforms can also be used with a smartphone and most can support a dial-in option from a landline. Often, the links can be sent to students or students can be invited by email. The following links are to “how to” documentation and login information. Also, check out our online meeting platform comparison sheet to see which of the most popular tools listed could fit your needs.

Canvas Conference session
: All faculty have access to the Canvas conferencing tool. Individuals can log into Canvas at canvas.chapman.edu [Canvas Conferences Video]

Microsoft Teams meeting
: All faculty and students have access to Teams meetings through Outlook

Zoom meeting: Chapman University have access to a free Zoom account at https://chapman.zoom.us.  See this great video from Ryan Allen regarding setting up and running Zoom: Some Zoom Basics

Google Meet: All faculty have access to Google Meet and can access it by using their Chapman credentials

Fostering Student Engagement

Even in remote environments, student engagement can be fostered and supported. Here are some fun ideas for engaging students.

Poll Everywhere (accessed through Chapman credentials): Create online polls to understand student comprehension and opinion

Kahoot! (requires individual account): Create fun online quizzes for students to evaluate their comprehension

Adobe Spark Pages (accessed through Chapman credentials): Have students collaborate through Adobe Spark pages

Consider Special Strategies for Specialized Instruction

Classes such as labs and performance-based courses may be more difficult to teach in an online format than a lecture-based course.

Suggestion for film

Film requires watching longer movies. The library gives you access to Kanopy, which has several full-length films, and other film-based access. Review the library's teaching remotely site for details.

Some suggestions for labs

  • Review the resources the library has specific to access to science labs.
  • Record portions of the lab yourself for students to watch and learn from, or find recordings of similar experiments available online (note: your textbook publisher may be a good source of these videos)
  • Provide data sets from similar experiments for students to analyze

Some suggestions for performance-based courses

  • Have students record their dance/speech/musical number and upload it to Canvas as an assignment
  • Schedule Canvas Conference sessions for group collaboration
  • Change the assignment to analyze performances done by others
Office hours and Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions

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