» Research Continuity

Chapman is rapidly responding to the changing COVID-19 pandemic throughout it’s many units and services. All activities of the Office of Research continue and any changes in operations will be communicated here and on the Chapman Coronavirus website. The State of California, as outlined in the Resilience Roadmap Stages, and OC Health Care Agency are lifting restrictions in many sectors of the economy. The following provides guidance for development of plans for restart and ramp up of research, scholarly and creative activities at Chapman. The framework for a restarting research and creative activities is based on the following resources:

As part of the CU Safely Back Plan, Chapman is proposing mitigation strategies of Physical Distancing, Symptoms Monitoring, Public Health Interventions, Face Coverings, Sanitation, and Return to Earlier Phase which are all important aspects of this plan for restarting research and creative activities. Below is information to inform faculty members, independent researchers and Unit leadership the guidance and process for restarting research.

The initial phase of the plan to transition from Phase 1 (current phase) to Phase 2 which will allow for a limited expansion of research activities will take place on June 22nd

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Guiding Principles

Principle #1: Follow local, State, and University remote work directives and maintain physical distancing.  Decisions on when Chapman will begin to restart research (or if needed, to ramp down research), and at which phase research can be conducted (more on phases below) are guided by the State Governor, the County Public Health Officer, and University requirements. As a general guideline, researchers should continue to perform non-essential research from home to the greatest extent possible.

Principle #2: Protect the health and safety of the research workforce, clinical patients and human research participants. Faculty, staff, and students who decide to conduct research on or off campus must understand and acknowledge the requirements to ensure healthy and safe in the work setting. Standards for safe work practices must be rigorously maintained by responsible parties, with adequate access to PPE and other safety related supplies. This also ensures a safe environment for any clinical patients or human research participants. Our ability to gradually and sustainably return research and scholarly activities to ‘normal’ will depend on everyone’s commitment to physical distancing and other safety measures at work and in our personal lives.

Principle #3: The restart of activities will require faculty members and researchers to develop detailed plans to address new health and safety requirements (see below for guidance). Detailed plans for restarting research activities in Phase 2 will need to be developed based on guidance specified for laboratory, animal, human subjects, field research and studio activities and approved by the University. (See below for Approval of Phased Activities).

Principle #4: Restarting of research will require prioritization of research activities, resources and safety. In prioritizing research activities, various factors should be considered including grant deadlines; careers of early stage researchers (undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs, and assistant professors); field work seasons; animal welfare; and level of risk to human subjects. The restarting of certain activities will require access to financial resources (i.e., startup funds, indirect account funds, gift funds, extramural grants) for critical operations, support of research personnel, purchase and upkeep of research supplies, and equipment needed to support the research mission of the University. 

Phased Approach

Phase 1: Essential research including

  • Research that cannot go unattended or neglected as this would lead to an unrecoverable loss of data or irreparable harm to equipment
  • Research that if not continued would lead to the endangerment of animals, or other specimens
  • COVID-19 research that requires on campus resources

Phase 2: Other non-essential research activities requiring Chapman facilities or having significant time sensitive components and having low risk for virus transmission

  • Research in the areas covered by State of California Essential Workforce Sectors.
  • Laboratory-based research with low density of populations in facilities
  • Research engaging students who are close to completing degrees where these activities are part of a degree requirement in the areas noted above by the State and are not part of laboratory classes
  • Expansion of human subjects research where risk can be mitigated to minimal level and no direct benefit
  • Field data requiring collection during a given season (i.e. summer). Approval will depend on restrictions in locality and travel restrictions
  • Animal experiments that can be performed by a single researcher in relative isolation
  • Activities that are still able to meet all sponsor requirements
  • Limited use of offices and of campus Libraries using social distancing protocols for scholarship which can not be completed remotely
  • All remote research should continue. All meetings, seminars, etc. should be remote
  • Include options for that may require limited access to other non-laboratory campus resources (i.e., libraries, offices)
  • Plans for sudden return to Phase 1 in place if needed

Phase 3: Expansion to other non-essential activities that are higher risk of virus transmission

  • Allow use of offices, library, and archives using social distancing protocols
  • Further expansion of human subject research where risk cannot be mitigated to a minimal risk level and no potential for direct benefit
  • All remote research should continue (including meetings, seminars, etc..)
  • Include options for humanities social sciences and creative activities that may require access to campus resources (i.e., libraries, offices, studios.

Phase 4: Full research operations

Assessment and Site-Specific Plans of Activities

To ensure compliance with Orange County Health Care Agency and the State of California statewide industry guidance, all faculty researchers will need to submit plans that assess the readiness of COVID-19 health and safety conditions and plans for mitigating any impacts. The Assessment and Site-Specific Plan - Phase 2 (non-essential research requiring Chapman facilities or time sensitive) should be used to prepare this analysis and plan prior to any activities starting. This plan will ensure compliance with California requirements as noted below:

California Requirements (Applicable Section in Chapman Plans)

  1. Perform a detailed risk assessment
    • Assessment
  2. Implement a site-specific protection plan
    • Site Specific Plans with mitigation strategies of Physical Distancing, Symptoms Monitoring, Public Health Interventions, Face Coverings, Sanitation, and Return to Earlier Phase
  3. Train employees on how to limit the spread of COVID-19, including how to screen themselves for symptoms and stay home if they have them
    • Site Specific Plan – Symptoms Monitoring
  4. Implement individual control measures and screenings
    • Site Specific Plan – Public Health Interventions, Physical Distancing and Face Coverings
  5. Implement disinfecting protocols
    • Site Specific Plan – Sanitation
  6. Implement physical distancing guidelines
    • Site Specific Plan – Physical Distancing 

The Assessment should be submitted to the appropriate Dean for review prior to preparation of a Site-Specific Plan. Upon approval from the Dean, plans will be submitted to the Vice President for Research and made accessible to the Environmental Health and Safety and Human Resources. Approvals will be made by the Vice President for Research.

Guidance for Laboratory Research

Schools and Colleges that perform laboratory-based research including the School of Pharmacy, Schmid College of Science and Technology, Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences, and Fowler School of Engineering should consider lab density in addition to the five mitigation strategies when restarting research.

Laboratory research activities must be phased in gradually so that population densities and safe practices can be monitored to ensure faculty, staff, and student health and safety. In addition, researchers should be prepared to ramp down activities in the event of heightened community health risk. Guidance for the six mitigations strategies follow.

  1. Physical Distancing
    1. Implement measures to ensure physical distancing of at least six feet between employees.
    2. Limited population density to ensure a minimum of 250 ft2 per person
    3. Limit the number of people in any given space. Potential strategies to control personnel density in research spaces include:
      • Work in shifts
      • Limit the number of people per defined area or room
      • Mark hallways/corridors with tape to demark one-way travel. Wider halls can be divided down the middle with directional arrows to restrict two-way travel to the right side only.
      • Schedule access/use of all common equipment. Determine if multiple pieces of co-located common equipment are too closely spaced to allow simultaneous use.
      • Control total number of building occupants at a defined entry point (allowing for screening steps defined below)
      • Where possible, identify one entrance and one exit door
    4. Scheduling: If appropriate, laboratory operations software such as iLab or shared calendars such as Google Calendar should be used to support operations for centralized laboratories and shared resource facilities. Shared calendars can also be used as tools to manage the number of people in the building.
    5. Stagger breaks if feasible to ensure physical distancing and minimal people in break rooms at a one time
    6. Use physical partitions or visual cues (e.g., floor markings or signs to indicate where employees should stand).
    7. All meetings should occur virtually, except when absolutely necessary for conducting research or maintaining laboratory safety. During in-person meetings physical distancing and face mask use are required.
    8. Minimize situations where two or more people must work together, and where this cannot be avoided (complex experiments, training experiences or where laboratory safety requires working with a partner) research personnel should follow Chapman University and public health directives; physical distancing; and PPE requirements to the greatest extent possible.
    9. Experiments that require access to equipment in another laboratory should be coordinated ahead of time, and appropriately reserved/scheduled.
  1. Symptoms Monitoring
    1. Screening:
      1. All personnel will complete a Qualtrics health screening questionnaire each day prior to reporting to campus. If any personnel report any signs or symptoms of illness, they will be directed to not report and to seek medical attention.
      2. SARS-CoV-2 testing will be done in accordance with the institutional recommendations established by Chapman University Human Resources, Student Health, and Occupational Safety found at Chapman Coronavirus: COVID-19 Exposure.
    2. Logging: Personnel will sign in and out of the facility. Retention of these records are essential for contract tracing.
    3. Monitoring and enforcement plans will be in place to ensure that physical distancing and other procedures are followed.
  1. Public Health Interventions
    1. EH&S has developed a short course of specialized training associated with the return to laboratories under the circumstances of the pandemic. All personnel returning to laboratories will be required to complete this training, hosted in LearnUpon, the Risk Management Learning Management System.
    2. Positive tests and contact tracing: Chapman University Student Health Services will oversee and coordinate health interventions and contact tracings for any personnel who test positive.
    3. Monitoring: Each laboratory/facility should indicate plans for how plans will be monitored and by whom. How will the impacts of non-compliance be mitigated? Will this include denying future access to users who do not follow the plan?
  1. Face Coverings
    1. Cloth face masks should be worn when working in public spaces. Please refer to CDC guidelines on the design and use of these masks.
    2. PPE appropriate to the environment and the work being done will be used at all times while in laboratories. For any instances in which the work requires an N-95 or higher degree of protection for which the worker has been approved by EH&S and medically qualified and fit-tested, a “cloth mask” or “surgical mask” will not be an appropriate substitute.
    3. All researchers are required to complete training on appropriate sanitation and PPE changing during work shifts (see below).
  1. Sanitation
    1. Hand washing is required at the start and finish of work as well as when gloves are changed.
    2. Labs should be sanitized using a CDC/EPA-approved product at a concentration for use against SARS-CoV-2 for disinfecting high-touch surfaces, such as bench tops, equipment surfaces, door handles, etc. This should be done at the end of each shift and documented on checklist.
    3. Sanitize all surfaces, using CDC approved methods and materials, including computer keyboards, shared equipment, and phones before starting research. This should be a daily process at a minimum, but as lab use increases, a more frequent schedule may be required.
    4. Common equipment should be sanitized before and after each use.
    5. Custodial staff will perform enhanced cleaning at the end of each day.
      1. Emphasis on floor cleaning and high touch surfaces (door handles, etc.)
      2. No lab benches or equipment will be cleaned by custodial staff.
    6. Personnel should avoid sharing phones, desks, office equipment, or other items wherever possible. In addition, they should never share PPE.
    7. Personnel will be given sufficient time before and after shifts to clean work areas. 
  1. Return to Earlier Phase
    1. In the event that the public health officials reinstate the Safer At Home order, research activities may need to rapidly ramp down again to Phase 1; researchers should have a plan in place to implement a ramp-down upon short notice.

Guidance for Human Subjects Research

Risks to participants, research staff and investigators should be considered before allowing on-campus research interactions. Research involving human subjects can best be categorized by the nature of the research procedures in relation to the available risk mitigation approaches. A basic principle of human subjects’ protection is to compare risk to that encountered in the conduct of everyday life, which defines minimal risk. The nature of human subjects research for each Phase are noted in the table below.

Phase 1: Essential (Remote) Research Phase

During this phase, the only form of human subjects research that is allowed are those studies that can be conducted remotely regardless of potential for direct benefit.  The only exceptions are if canceling or postponing the activities would either increase the risk to the safety or wellbeing of the research participant.   

Phase 2: Restart of non-essential research activities where risk of exposure can be minimized

  • Clinical and human subjects research that can be conducted remotely regardless of potential for direct benefit.
  • On-campus research activities that may pose lower risk for virus transmission.
  • Research where a continued pause or deferral would lead to excessive restart costs and loss of research results.
  • Examples include:
    • Deadline driven experiments or those close to completion
    • Time-sensitive assessments of currently enrolled participants in longitudinal observational studies 

Phase 3: Restart of non-essential research activities where risk of exposure cannot be minimized

  • All Phase 1 and 2 activities
  • New on‐campus research activities where risk can be mitigated to minimal level and no direct benefit
  • Community/ Field‐based research where risk can be mitigated to minimal level and no direct benefit

Guidance for Site-Specific Research Plan - PHASE 2:

Because human subjects research differs from study-to-study due to a variety of factors, this guidance does not address all circumstances and planning scenarios. It is intended to serve as general guidance to help faculty and researchers to develop plans that include controls, measures and precautions for limiting potential virus transmission and maintaining low population density in research spaces.

All clinical research conducted in Phase 2 and 3 must be performed in a manner which minimizes risk to participants and research personnel. As studies are allowed to restart, adherence to the risk mitigation strategies below will be more challenging and require detailed planning and effort on behalf of research personnel. A site-specific plan addressing risk mitigation must be approved by the IRB prior to commencement of in-person visits.

Site-Specific Plans should follow the guidance from the CU Safely Back Plan, and Guidance for a Phased Approached to Restarting Research and Creative Activities. Site-specific information should demonstrate COVID-19 mitigation measures in the areas of Physical Distancing, Symptoms Monitoring, Public Health Interventions, Face Coverings, and Sanitation. In addition, all researchers should identify plans for ramping down activities to an earlier Phase if needed depending on State and local authority directives. 

The research plan guidance below is based on best-practices for general clinical research activities; however, risk mitigation plans may vary depending on study specific requirements. It’s also critical to regularly evaluate the research areas and workspace for compliance with the plan and document and correct deficiencies identified. 

  1. Physical Distancing
    1. Limiting the number of research personnel present at any given time.
    2. Limiting the total number of people with access to clinic/research space
      1. Control population density in Chapman research facilities based on 250 ft2 per person and occupancy standards.
      2. Abide by local gathering restrictions.
    3. Limiting the number of people in any given space: several strategies will be used to control spacing.
      1. Hallways marked with tape to demark one-way travel in passageways that are too narrow to allow personnel to safely pass. Wider halls divided down the middle with directional arrows to restrict two-way travel to the right side only.
      2. Entry into building with spacing controls (allowing for temperature screening and ID swipe).
      3. Were possible, identify one entrance and one exit door
    4. Limiting non-essential contacts including companions, visitors, and observers from research spaces until phase 4.
    5. Stagger breaks if feasible to ensure physical distancing and minimal people in break rooms at a one time
  1. Symptoms Monitoring

    1. Screening: All personnel will complete a Qualtrics health screening questionnaire each day prior to reporting to campus. If any personnel report any signs or symptoms of illness, they will be directed to not report and to seek medical attention.
    2. SARS-CoV-2 testing will be done in accordance with the institutional recommendations established by Chapman University Human Resources, Student Health, and Environmental Health and Safety found at Chapman Coronavirus: COVID-19 Exposure.
    3. Persons who are 65 years or older, have a chronic underlying condition, or have a compromised immune system are particular vulnerable to severe impacts of respiratory infection. These vulnerable populations should not be included in Phase 2 unless risks can be appropriately justified and mitigated.
    4. Logging: Personnel swipe their ID card in a magnetic reader to record their entry and exit from the building.
    5. Documentation of personnel: PI’s schedule their personnel on a master calendar for each shift. The schedule posted publicly to allow enforcement of the schedule. Only scheduled personnel allowed access.
    6. It is important that all personnel working in the research areas understand and accept personal responsibility for monitoring their own behavior and that of their colleagues, and coach each other as necessary and appropriate to maintaining these standards. This is a group/team effort.
  1. Public Health Interventions
    1. Training: Require online training module in LearnUpon to cover all CU-specific procedures and rules.
    2. Positive tests and contact tracing: Contact Chapman University Student Health Services for health interventions and contact tracings for any research personnel that test positive. Any personnel with symptoms will not be allowed in the building and be tested for SARS-CoV-2. If negative they can return when they are asymptomatic.
  1. Face Coverings
    1. Require PPE appropriate to the environment and the work being done, and at all other times require disposable surgical masks or cloth masks to be used for the purpose of decreasing potential transmission of aerosolized virus from those with asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infection. Other PPE, such as face shields, lab coats, gloves, and eye protection should be used consistent with the requirements of the research.
    2. Training should include information on appropriate sanitation, hand washing, and PPE changing during work shifts.
    3. Chapman University will provide disposable surgical masks for all personnel and research participants.
  1. Sanitation
    1. Require frequent handwashing with soap and water, including scrubbing with soap for 20 seconds (or using hand sanitizer with at least 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol when employees cannot get to a sink or handwashing station, per CDC guidelines). 
    2. Clean and disinfect touchable surfaces between shifts or between users, whichever is more frequent, including but not limited to working surfaces, tools, handles and latches, and controls on stationary and mobile equipment.
    3. Personnel should avoid sharing phones, desks, office equipment, or other items wherever possible. In addition, they should never share PPE.
    4. Personnel will be given sufficient time before and after shifts to clean work areas.
    5. Custodial staff will perform enhanced cleaning at the end of each day.
      1. Emphasis on floor cleaning and high touch surfaces (door handles, etc.)
  1. Return to Earlier Phase
    1. In the event that the public health officials reinstate the Safer at Home order, research activities may need to rapidly ramp down again; researchers should have a plan in place to implement a ramp-down upon short notice.

Guidance for Field Research

Field research – broadly defined as scholarship by Chapman students, faculty and staff at offsite locations – is a hallmark of Chapman’s research efforts.  Field work allows students and faculty to explore some of the most pressing questions in the areas of environmental science, biology, chemistry, and earth systems science (among others).  This work can be short-term and local (e.g., researchers collecting samples in Orange County in a single day), or long-term and distant (e.g., research teams deploying for weeks- or months-long field campaigns outside of California or internationally).  While there are instances where field work simplifies social distancing due to the fact that it often takes place outdoors, there are also unique challenges to conducting this work in a way that is consistent with Chapman’s commitment to ensuring the safety of research teams  and the community-at-large in the context of COVID-19.

Consistent with University guidelines, no one may participate in field research if they are feeling ill, have a temperature above 100.4 °F, or if any members of their immediate household are experiencing flu-like symptoms.  If a member of a field research team presents flu-like symptoms, they must immediately cease field work, self-quarantine, and seek  COVID testing as soon as possible.  The remainder of the research team may continue their work but must make extra efforts to isolate the crew from contact with others that have not necessarily been exposed.

Field research can not be initiated until a Assessment and a Site Specific Plan are developed by the principle investigator using the guidance provided in this template.  Both the Field Research Assessment and Site Specific Plan must be approved by the Dean, submitted to the Vice President for Research and made accessible to EH&S. The Field Research Assessment and the Site Specific Plan must utilize the template and the guidance below to describe the  mitigation strategies of physical distancing, symptoms monitoring, public health interventions, face coverings, sanitation and return to earlier phase.

The Field Research Assessment and Site Specific Plan must be shared with all researchers involved with the project.  Researchers (students, staff, post-doctoral scientists, technicians) must not be compelled to participate in any aspect of the field research that they are not comfortable with.  There can be no penalties for opting out of all, or part of, the proposed research.  In addition, researchers can change their mind about any activity at any point after the research has begun.  Plan Owners (principle investigators) must obtain positive consent of the willingness of team members to participate in the research following the guidelines of the Field Research Operation Plan.  Plan Owners are encouraged to be mindful of the inherent power dynamics in these conversations and must not imply any negative consequences for individuals uncomfortable participating in field research. 

ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE

Name of Facility/Activity and Brief Description:

For field research, please include:

  • A description of the proposed research and a justification as to why continuing the work is justified given the added risk of Chapman University researchers contributing to the spread of COVID-19 beyond campus. This description should focus on why delaying the research would have a detrimental impact on the project (e.g., irrecoverable loss of data or samples) or the professional development of members of the research team (e.g., progression towards degree of students, disruption of tenure clock for junior faculty).

SITE SPECIFIC PLAN GUIDANCE

  1. Physical Distancing

For field research, this should include:

  • Details on how housing accommodations for extended research will maximize physical distancing. In cases where researchers must share accommodations, include details on how pairs/groups will be socially distanced, i.e., if two individuals share accommodations, other daily activities such as riding in vehicles should be scheduled to maximize this pairing. 
  • Details on efforts to lower the density of researchers in cars/trucks/boats used to conduct research. All efforts should be made for single occupancy of field vehicles.  When single occupancy is not feasible, additional safety precautions should be described.
  1. Symptoms Monitoring

For field research, this should include:

  • All personnel will complete a Qualtrics health screening questionnaire each day prior to reporting to the field. If any personnel report any signs or symptoms of illness, they will be directed to not report and to seek medical attention.
  • SARS-CoV-2 testing will be done in accordance with the institutional recommendations established by Chapman University Human Resources, Student Health, and Occupational Safety found at Chapman Coronavirus: COVID-19 Exposure.
  • A plan for a daily log of field research activities, including locations sampled, public or private venues accessed or visited, and personnel in attendance should tracing become necessary. 
  1. Public Health Interventions

For field research, this should include:

  • Documentation that travel to and from the field location is allowed by current University travel restrictions and by any local health restrictions at the field site. This should include details on travelling to non-local field sites (e.g., plans for airline travel) where appropriate
  • Documentation that adequate public health interventions are available to all researchers. Plan Owners should ensure that adequate contingency funds are available for these interventions.  For extended, non-local research, Plan Owners should document:
    • Access to local medical and health facilities, including an estimated time to reach emergency services.
    • A plan for self-isolation / quarantine for any field research at the location of the field research.
  • Positive tests and contact tracing: Contact Chapman University Student Health Services for health interventions and contact tracings for any research personnel that test positive.
  1. Face Coverings

For field research, this should include:

  • A plan to ensure that cloth masks will be available and utilized when working in public spaces and in groups. Please refer to CDC guidelines on the design of these masks.
  1. Sanitation

For field research, this should include:

  • Protocols for sanitation of shared equipment used to support field research, with details on sanitation methods and the timing of sanitation.
  • Details for planned sanitation of high-touch areas associated with travel (e.g., door handles, keys, steering wheels, etc…)
  • Personnel should avoid sharing phones, desks, office equipment, or other items wherever possible. In addition, they should never share PPE.
  • Personnel will be given sufficient time before and after shifts to clean work areas.
  1. Return to Earlier Phase

For field research, this should include:

  • A plan for a return to Chapman should this be required based on directives from State or local authorities, or return to an earlier Phase of research by Chapman University.
  • A plan to enable a return to Chapman University if a researcher is no longer willing to risk conducting field research.

Guidance for Leatherby Libraries, Archives, and Communal Study Areas

Overview: The Leatherby Libraries are fully supportive of the Office of Research in their efforts regarding research reentry. Librarians are partners in the research process, and they are readily available to provide individual research consultations, provide reference assistance, and to conduct research-focused library instruction. The library is also working collaboratively with IS&T to ensure continued access to all electronic resources from on or off campus. The library acquisition budget will be utilized to assure research support for faculty and students. Additionally, once essential staff are allowed back on campus and if the library is still physically unavailable, the library will  make physical items in the stacks and in selected archives available for faculty use to meet their research needs.

Chapman University proposes that the Leatherby Libraries, archives, and internal communal library study areas be utilized to the maximum occupancy for safety. This will be accomplished by establishing a minimum of 6-foot distance between individuals and physical distancing for library service points.  The library will require face mask usage by all patrons and staff; will designate and facilitate entry and exit routes to avoid congestion; and will provide sanitization materials to reduce viral transmission. 

Physical Distancing

  • Seats and workstations will be moved a minimum of 6-foot distances from one another
  • Entry and exit routes and stairwells and elevators will be clearly designated and facilitated to avoid congestion
  • Signage and floor markings at public service desk areas for waiting students will be posted

Symptoms Monitoring

  • Hand-held forehead temperature screenings (or other approved equipment) will be implemented at entrances to libraries and staff will disallow entry for individuals with a body temperature over 100.0 F/38.0 C
  • Individuals who exhibit Covid 19 symptoms will be identified and these individuals will be directed to contact their health provider and to leave the Leatherby Libraries or corresponding study area immediately

Public Health Interventions

  • Leatherby Libraries staff may be trained to enforce physical distancing to quickly identify students with concerning symptoms for further investigation

Sanitation

  • Custodians will wipe down study tables, restrooms, technology, and common surfaces a minimum of three times a day
  • Sanitizer wipes will be available at the entrance to buildings and located strategically on all floors

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

If I already have access as part of Phase 1 activities, do I still need to submit approval for Phase 2 activities?

Yes, all faculty will need to obtain approvals from their Deans and prepare a Site-Specific Plan to ensure proper health and safety measures are in place.

 Are undergraduate students permitted in Phase 2 activities?

Undergraduate student researchers are permitted in Phase 2 research activities if they support a faculty research project that has been approved. 

 How often will Phase 2 activities be approved?

The review and approval of Phase 2 activities will initially be due on June 19 (noon) to the Office of Research (officeofresearch@chapman.edu). After that, submission of plans will be on a rolling basis upon approval from the Dean.

What resources are available from the libraries to support research and scholarship?

The Leatherby Libraries currently provides access to over 300 online databases, 86,000 online journals, 18,000 ebooks, online streaming media, including films and documentaries, and much more. In addition, they are exploring the option of requesting physical library materials via curb side pick-up (date TBD). Please check the library website for additional information.

COVID-19 Research Funding Opportunities

Sponsor: US Patent and Trade Office (USPTO)
Posted On: 5/22/2020
 
Sponsor: Mercatus Center
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior & Psychology; Community & Social Services; Data Science, AI & Computing; Epidemiology & Public Health; Humanities; Life Sciences; Policy, Economics & Labor
Posted On: 5/15/2020
 
Sponsor: Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior & Psychology; Community & Social Services; Data Science, AI & Computing; Engineering; Humanities; Policy, Economics & Labor; Instruction
Amount: Anticipated Range $50K-$100K
Posted On: 5/14/2020
 
Sponsor: NIH NCI-NIAID
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: $500,000 to $3,000,000 per year depending on funding mechanism
Posted On: 5/14/2020
 
Sponsor: CETF and Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Up to $1M
Posted On: 5/12/2020
 
Sponsor: Economic Development Administration (EDA)
Fundraising Area(s): Community & Social Services; Policy, Economics & Labor
Amount: Typically up to $1,000,000
Posted On: 5/12/2020
  
Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)
Fundraising Area(s): Community & Social Services; Instruction
Amount: $25,000-$500,000
Sponsor Deadline: 6/12/2020
Posted On: 5/12/2020
 
Sponsor: Spencer Foundation
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior & Psychology; Community & Social Services; Humanities; Policy, Economics & Labor; Instruction
Amount: Up to $50K
Sponsor Deadline: 6/8/2020
Posted On: 5/8/2020
 
Sponsor: Booz Hamilton Foundation
Grant/ Award Title: Innovation Fund
Fundraising Area(s): Community & Social Services; Epidemiology & Public Health; Policy, Economics & Labor
Amount: Up to $100,000
Sponsor Deadline: 6/5/2020
Posted On: 5/5/2020
 
Sponsor: American Lung Association
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Up to $100,000
Sponsor Deadline: 5/30/20
Posted On: 5/1/20
 
Sponsor: NIH NIBIB Point-of-Care Technologies Research Network (POCTRN)
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Phase 0 $25,000; Phase 1 $500,000; Phase 2 tens of millions expected
Posted On: 4/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Typically up to $500,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/30/21
Posted On: 4/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology & Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Up to $275,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/30/21
Posted On: 4/30/20
 
Sponsor: Microsoft
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI & Computing
Sponsor Deadline: 6/15/20
Posted On: 4/29/20
 
Sponsor: Social Sciences Research Council
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior and Psychology; Community and Social Services; Policy, Economics, and Labor
Amount: Up to $50,000
Sponsor Deadline: 6/30/20
Posted On: 4/25/20
 
Sponsor: Alianza UCMX and InnovaUNAM
Fundraising Area(s): Community and Social Services; Data Science, AI, Computing; Engineering; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences; Policy, Economics, and Labor
Amount: $10,000 for first stage; $25,000 for second stage
Sponsor Deadline: 5/30/20
Posted On: 4/24/20
 
Sponsor: DARPA
Grant/ Award Title: COVID-19 + DARPA
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior and Psychology; Data Science, AI, Computing; Engineering; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences
Posted On: 4/23/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Army
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI, Computing; Engineering; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences
Posted On: 4/23/20
 
Sponsor: EdTech Hub, mEducation Alliance, Global Innovation Exchange (GIE)
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior and Psychology; Community and Social Services; Instruction
Sponsor Deadline: 5/29/20
Posted On: 4/23/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCATS
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences
Sponsor Deadline: 11/10/20
Posted On: 4/23/20
 
Sponsor: Pfizer
Grant/ Award Title: Competitive Grants Program
Fundraising Area(s): Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences
Amount: Up to $250,000
Sponsor Deadline: 5/22/20
Posted On: 4/23/20
 
Sponsor: DOD Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
Fundraising Area(s): Engineering; Epidemiology / Public Health
Sponsor Deadline: 5/2/20
Posted On: 4/22/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Army
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI, Computing
Amount: $7,000,000 total for up to six awards
Sponsor Deadline: 4/27/20
Posted On: 4/20/20
 
Sponsor: NIH, NIMHD, NIA, NIDA, NCI
Fundraising Area(s): Public Health / Health Disparity 
Sponsor Deadline: 10/5/20
Posted On: 4/20/20
 
Sponsor: NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI, Computing; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences
Sponsor Deadline: 5/8/20
Posted On: 4/20/20
 
Sponsor: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)
Fundraising Area(s): Community and Social Services; Epidemiology / Public Health
Amount: Up to $500,000
Posted On: 4/20/20
 
Sponsor: USDA-NIFA
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI, Computing; Engineering; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences; Policy, Economics, and Labor
Amount: Up to $1,000,000
Sponsor Deadline: 6/4/20
Posted On: 4/20/20
 
Sponsor: NIH National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior and Psychology; Epidemiology / Public Health; Life Sciences; Policy, Economics, and Labor
Amount: Up to $100,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/15/21
Posted On: 4/17/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-National Library of Medicine (NLM)
Fundraising Area(s): Data Science, AI, Computing; Epidemiology / Public Health
Amount: Up to $75,000
Sponsor Deadline: 6/1/20
Posted On: 4/17/20
 
Sponsor: Merck Research Laboratories
Fundraising Area(s): Life Sciences
Amount: Up to $125K
Sponsor Deadline: 5/15/20
Posted On: 4/15/20
 
Sponsor: NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research (OBSSR)
Fundraising Area(s): Behavior and Psychology; Community and Social Services; Epidemiology / Public Health; Policy, Economics, and Labor
Amount: Up to $100,000
Sponsor Deadline: 3/31/21
Posted On: 4/15/20
 
Sponsor: NEA
Grant/ Award Title: NEA CARES Act Grant Program 
Amount: $50,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/22/20
Posted On: 5/4/20
 
Sponsor: NIDCD
Sponsor Deadline: 6/1/20
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH (NCI, NCCIH, NHGRI, NIAID, NICHD, NIDDK, NIEHS, NIGMS, NIMHD, NIBIB, NCATS)
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCATS
Sponsor Deadline: 1/25/22
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCCIH, NIH-NIA, NIH-NIAAA
Sponsor Deadline: 10/6/20
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCI
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIBIB
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIBIB
Sponsor Deadline: 11/10/20
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIDDK
Sponsor Deadline: 6/1/20
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIDDK
Sponsor Deadline: 6/2/20
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIEHS
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIMHD, NIH-NIA, NIH-NIMH
Posted On: 4/10/20
 
Sponsor: CDC
Sponsor Deadline: 5/1/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Defense Health Program
Amount: up to $4M in total costs
Sponsor Deadline: 5/28/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Defense Health Program
Amount: up to $2M in total costs
Sponsor Deadline: 5/28/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Defense Health Program
Amount: up to $30M in total costs, shared among five awards.
Sponsor Deadline: 6/8/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: Donaghue Foundation
Amount: up to $400,000
Sponsor Deadline: 5/11/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: Google
Grant/ Award Title: Google Cloud research credits
Posted On: 4/9//20
 
Sponsor: Harrington Discovery Institute
Amount: $150,000, with the potential to receive up to $1M
Sponsor Deadline: 4/30/20
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation
Posted On: 4/9/20
 
Sponsor: DARPA
Grant/ Award Title: COVID-19 + DARPA
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Air Force
Sponsor Deadline: 9/30/20
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: Joint European Disruptive Initiative (JEDI)
Amount: Up to 2 million Euros
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIGMS
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: Omidyar Network
Posted On: 4/8/20
 
Sponsor: DOD Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)
Amount: Up to $1,000,000
Sponsor Deadline: 5/4/20
Posted On: 4/7/20
 
Sponsor: DOD Joint Acquisition Task Force (JATF)
Posted On:  4/7/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Army
Posted On:  4/7/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Army
Posted On: 4/7/20
 
Sponsor: DOD-Army
Amount: $30,000,000-$37,000,000 total for up to six awards
Posted On: 4/7/20
 
Sponsor: HHS-AHRQ
Posted On: 4/7/20
 
Sponsor: HHS-AHRQ
Posted On: 4/7/20
 
Sponsor: HHS-BARDA
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: Mercatus Center
Amount: $1,000
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: NASA
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: NEH
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: Novartis
Grant/ Award Title: COVID-19 Response Fund
Amount: $100,000-$250,000
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: Pfizer
Grant/ Award Title: Competitive Grants Program
Posted On: 4/7/2020
 
Sponsor: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Amount: $100,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/22/20
Posted On: 4/6/2020
 
Sponsor: DOD
Amount: up to $50,000 for a single investigator or $100,000 for a collaborative team
Sponsor Deadline: 5/15/20
Posted On: 4/6/20
 
Sponsor: Russell Sage Foundation
Grant/ Award Title: Research Grants
Amount: Up to $175,000
Sponsor Deadline: 5/21/20
Posted On: 4/6/2020
 
Sponsor: UCOP
Amount: up to $25,000
Posted On: 4/6/2020
 
Sponsor: Elevate Prize Foundation
Grant/ Award Title: Elevate Prize
Amount: Minimum of $300K prize
Sponsor Deadline: 6/29/20
Posted On: 4/3/20
 
Sponsor: Allen Institute for AI
Amount: $1,000 per task award
Posted On: 4/2/20
 
Sponsor: DOC-NIST
Amount: Up to $10,000,000
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: DOE-Office of Science
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Erlha
Amount: no funding limits
Sponsor Deadline: 5/4/20
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Gates Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Mastercard, CZI
Amount: no funding limits
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Ginkgo Bioworks
Grant/ Award Title: Free Access to Ginkgo Platform
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: HHS-BARDA
Grant/ Award Title: Broad Agency Announcement
Sponsor Deadline: 10/31/20
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: HHS-BARDA
Sponsor Deadline: 2/3/23
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Mozilla Open Source Support Program (MOSS)
Grant/ Award Title: Open Source Support Awards
Amount: Up to $50,000
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIA
Sponsor Deadline: 5/1/20
Posted On: 4/2/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIMH
Sponsor Deadline: 5/1/20
Posted On: 4/2/20
 
Sponsor: NSF
Posted On: 4/2/20
 
Sponsor: NSF
Posted On: 4/2/20
 
Sponsor: OSTP DOE IBM
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting
Amount: No funding limitations
Posted On: 4/2/2020
 
Sponsor: Amazon Web Services
Sponsor Deadline: 6/20/20
Posted On: 3/31/20
 
Sponsor: CITRIS
Amount: Up to $50,000
Sponsor Deadline: 4/24/20
Posted On: 3/31/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCATS
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NCATS
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NHGRI
Sponsor Deadline: 5/15/20
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NHLBI
Sponsor Deadline: 10/5/20
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Sponsor Deadline: 6/29/20
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Sponsor Deadline: 9/9/20
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Grant/ Award Title: Administrative Supplements
Sponsor Deadline: 2/6/21
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID
Sponsor Deadline: 4/5/21
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIAID & NIGMS
Posted On: 3/30/20
 
Sponsor: NIH-NIDA
Sponsor Deadline: 3/31/20
Posted On: 3/30/20

Research Experts

Dr. Hesham El-Askary – Schmid Science and Technology

Dr. El-Askary and scientists are monitoring the emissions (Nitrogen oxides) which are indicators of human activities. These include fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning for selected COVID-19 hotspot regions: East Asia, Europe, Middle East and North Africa. This research shows how these regions are responding to this global situation 1) before the outbreaks of Wuhan; 2) during the outbreaks of Wuhan; and 3) after the outbreak in Wuhan.

More information...

Dr. Steven Gjerstad – Economic Science Institute and Dr. Andrea Molle – Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Political Science

Drs Gjerstad and Molle have published a note that considers whether age is an independent factor that contributes to COVID-19 mortalities, or whether comorbidity factors such as heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension are the major contributors to mortality. These morbidity factors increase rapidly with age, but otherwise healthy people appear to have low mortality at all ages for COVID-19 cases.

Claudine JaenichenWilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Department of Art

Professor Jaenichen is part of the Design Network for Emergency Management (dnem.org) that launched a survey to collect data to benchmark the effectiveness of information and visual communication distributed to the public on COVID-19. They plan to assess the data and analyze if the messaging supports the various intended performance tasks. They also see an opportunity to apply evidence-based design to improve the quality and consistency of messaging with a high-level of understanding public cognitive responses. In addition, she  was asked to work with FEMA to complete a comprehensive literature review and launch a national design campaign to clarify the definition and actionable items for “shelter-in-place.” She is still working on the project and the information we are living is already altering how we think about sheltering and the degrees of confusion.

Dr. Jerika Lam – School of Pharmacy

Dr. Lam, an infectious disease pharmacist, is a member of the Patient Safety Movement Foundation COVID-19 Task Force. This group holds webinars every Friday morning where task force members provide the national and international members weekly updates about the coronavirus, particularly about preventive and management strategies of COVID-19 from an interdisciplinary group of healthcare professionals (medicine, pharmacy and nursing) in different healthcare settings. She is the only infectious diseases pharmacist on the task force and provides updates about drug treatments and management strategies against COVID-19.

Dr. Pete Simi – Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Sociology

Dr. Pete Simi and his research group are working on a couple COVID-19 related projects as part of their larger study of white supremacists groups: 1) Based on a long-term study of online activity among white supremacists and their use of different social media platforms (e.g., Telegram), we are now specifically examining white supremacists’ discussions of COVID-19 including advocacy for spreading the virus and using it as a biological weapon of mass destruction; and 2) the research group is also in communication with the Orange County Human Relations Commission regarding hate crimes and hate incidents related to COVID-19 and will be monitoring the nature and prevalence of this problem both locally and nation-wide.

Stephanie Saldivar, MS, PA-C – Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences; Physician Assistant Studies

Stephanie Saldivar is a Clinical Assistant Professor and the Director of Clinical Education for the PA Studies Program within Crean College. She is a certified Physician Assistant (PA) and specializes in Emergency Medicine. Stephanie currently practices medicine in a local Orange County Emergency room and has been on the front lines as a healthcare provider during the COVID-19 pandemic. She will be sharing how her workplace is currently preparing for and managing suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, how medical education has been affected, and how PAs are responding to the pandemic.

Dr. Hillard Kaplan – Economic Science Institute, School of Pharmacy, The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics

Dr. Hillard Kaplan is Professor of Health Economics and Anthropology in the Economic Science Institute within the Argyros School of Business and Economics at Chapman University. He is the principal investigator on a collaborative and multi-disciplinary research program studying cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease among two tribal populations in lowland Bolivia. However, in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the team has paused their research and are now redirecting their efforts to mitigating the effects of the COVID-19 on the tribal populations with whom they work. They are currently engaged in a collaborative effort with the tribal leadership and government authorities responsible for responding to the pandemic engaging in a collective decision-making process to determine the response needed to combat the epidemic. They hope to create an approach that can be adapted more generally for global tribal and aboriginal populations.

Jim Doti, Ph.D. – The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics

Jim Doti is president emeritus and professor of economics.  He founded the A. Gary Anderson Center for Economic Research and has presented the Chapman Economic Forecast for 42 consecutive years.  Dr. Doti will be providing analyses relating to when and how the California economy should hit the restart button.

Jennifer D. Keene, Ph.D. – Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Department of History

Jennifer D. Keene is a professor of history and dean of the Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. She is a well-published expert on World War I. She has been involved in numerous public history projects that underscore the relevance of the World War I-era to the present day. She has served as an historical advisor to the World War I Centennial Commission, an historical consultant for numerous exhibits and films, and was recently featured in the PBS documentary mini-series, The Great War. She will speak about the Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and how learning about this pandemic of a century ago may give us a clearer perspective on today’s COVID-19 crisis.

Jason Douglas, Ph.D. – Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences; Health Sciences

Jason Douglas is an Assistant Professor of Public Health in the Department of Health Sciences, Crean College of Health and Behavioral Science. Guided by the principles and practice of community-based participatory research, Dr. Douglas works with disadvantaged communities to investigate social and environmental determinants of public health disparities. Dr. Douglas is collaborating with Drs. Lawrence Brown, Angel Miles Nash, Emmanuel John, and Georgiana Bostean in an interdisciplinary context to examine the extent to which ethnocultural minority groups in the cities of New York and Los Angeles may be at higher risk for COVID-19 morbidity and mortality than non-minority groups. By examining COVID-19 impacts in these distinct geographies, this collaborative research seeks to: (1) identify social and environmental factors that may manifest in COVID-19 health disparities, and (2) develop a Viral Pandemic Risk Index based on study results.

Gregory Goldsmith, Ph.D. – Schmid College of Science and Technology; Biological Sciences

Gregory Goldsmith is an assistant professor of biology and the director of the Grand Challenges Initiative. Dr. Goldsmith will present preliminary results from a project that is building a comprehensive database of the response of U.S. colleges and universities to the emergence of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2). Working with a team of 10 Chapman University undergraduates, Goldsmith and his collaborators have collected data on when higher education institutions transitioned to online learning, closed residence halls, and instituted remote work for faculty and staff. The results have the potential to improve epidemiological models of disease transmission, inform policy developed by public health officials, and provide insights for decision makers within the higher education community.

Erik Linstead, Ph.D. – Fowler School of Engineering; Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, School of Pharmacy, The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics

Erik Linstead is associate professor and the associate dean of academic programs and faculty development in the Fowler School of Engineering. He is the principal investigator of the Machine Learning and Affiliated Technologies (MLAT) lab. Prior to his current role, he spent 12 years at Boeing as an embedded software engineer and currently serves as a consulting senior engineering specialist for the Aerospace Corporation in the areas of deep learning and computer vision. He will be sharing how students and faculty at Chapman have leveraged curriculum related to 3D printing and modeling to manufacture face shields as a response to PPE shortages arising from COVID-19. To date, over 2,000 units have been donated.

Dr. Michael Burney – Chair, Department of Physician Assistant – Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences

Dr. Burney is Chair of the Department of Physician Assistant Studies. He has been a Physician Assistant for 28 years and practiced Family Medicine in the Orange County area for over 15 years. He is works in an occupational medicine clinic. Dr. Burney and others in the Physician Assistant program are working on the front lines of the caring for COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients during this critical time.

Shenyue Jia, Ph.D.

Shenyue Jia along with her colleagues in the Center of Excellence in Earth Systems Modeling and Observations (CEESMO) within the Schmid College of Science and Technology at Chapman University are working on identifying at-risk communities for COVID-19 using crowdsourced connectivity data. The team’s research focuses on rural and relatively isolated communities of the hardest-hit states in the U.S. by the COVID-19 pandemic. She will share how information from crowdsourced connectivity data from Facebook Disaster Maps and the CDC’s vulnerability index can help decision making in vulnerable communities as cases surge. Team members include Drs. Seung Hee Kim and Menas Kafatos from CEESMO at Chapman, Dr. Son V. Nghiem from NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Dr. Andrew Schroeder from Direct Relief.

Tara Gruenwald, Ph.D., MPH Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences; Psychology

Tara Gruenewald, Ph.D., MPH is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology in the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences. Tara is a social and health psychologist with additional training in Public Health and Geronotology. Her research focuses on the social and psychological factors which shape functioning, physiology and health across the life course.  As a stress researcher, she views the potential harm to mental, physical, social and economic well-being from the COVID-19 pandemic as unrivaled among societal stressors in the last century, yet she has been intrigued by the fact that many Americans and others worldwide have responded in ways targeted to benefit the collective good.  Dr. Gruenewald is investigating how such prosocial orientations might not only help society but also benefit givers’ mental, social and physical well-being as they cope with the pandemic threat.

Marc Weidenmier, Ph.D. – The George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics

Dr. Marc Weidenmier is a Professor of Economics and Finance in the George L. Argyros School of Business and Economics. He will be providing an update on the impacts of COVID-19 on consumer confidence as measured from the Chapman–CMC Orange County Consumer Sentiment Index. See recent article in OC Register.

Anna Leahy, Ph.D. Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Department of English

Anna Leahy, Ph.D.  is a Professor of English in the Wilkinson College or Arts, Humanities, and Social Science.  Dr. Leahy will discuss the ways that writers have been affected by and are responding to the global pandemic, with a focus on journalism and science writing, new initiatives in literary culture that have emerged over the last several weeks, and the importance of individuals documenting their experiences of this historical moment of change.

Anna Leahy is the author of the poetry book Aperture and Constituents of Matter and the nonfiction book Tumor. Her essays have won top prizes from Los Angeles Review, Ninth Letter, and Dogwood. She directs the MFA in Creative Writing program and edits the international Tab Journal. See more at amleahy.com.

Daniel Tomaszewski, Ph.D. School of Pharmacy

Daniel Tomaszewsi, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in Pharmacy Administration in the Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Department. Dr. Tomaszewski has focused his research in three primary areas, use of opioids in pediatric patients, medication adherence, and drug pricing/policy. Regarding youth, Dr. Tomaszewski’s program evaluates the use of opioid prescribing patterns in inpatient care facilities, emergency departments, and ambulatory clinic visits.
Dan is currently examining, as it is expressed in academic institutions, how changes in stress during the coronavirus pandemic impact student health and learning and how psychosocial resources reduce the impact of stress on health and learning outcomes to help pinpoint resources that should be targeted in future interventions.

Seth G. Benzell

Seth G. Benzell is a postdoctoral associate at the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy in the group on Productivity, Employment, and Inequality.  He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Boston University. Seth’s work is in the economics of automation, digitization, and networks. He is also interested in public economics generally. Current research focuses are social networks, optimal regulation, and taxation of online digital platforms, and predicting how new technologies, especially artificial intelligence, will impact investment, wages and welfare. His work has received significant press attention, he has briefed legislative assistants at the U.S. Capitol. Seth will be presenting his research on how to ration social contact during the pandemic and discuss other social mobility reduction research currently underway at MIT. He will be joining Chapman’s Argyros School of Business and Economics in Fall 2020.

Jennifer Totonchy, Ph.D – School of Pharmacy

Jennifer Totonchy, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Immunology and Immunotherapeutics at the School of Pharmacy. She is an accomplished virologist and has worked on host-virus interactions for both DNA and RNA viruses. Her laboratory is currently focused on infection of human B cells with Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus.  In response to the pandemic, Dr. Totonchy has organized a multi-disciplinary collaboration of faculty at the School of Pharmacy and the Fowler School of Engineering to develop a low-tech but highly sensitive antigen test for COVID19 infection.

Michelle Samura, Ph.D – Attallah College of Educational Studies

Dr. Michelle Samura is Associate Professor and Associate Dean in the Attallah College of Educational Studies. She also is the founding Co-Director of the Collaborate Initiative and principal investigator of the Architecture of Belonging project. Dr. Samura conducts research, publishes, and speaks on the relationship between space and belonging. She currently is drawing upon insights from the fields of design and architecture to identify key design principles and elements of built environments that promote belonging in educational, workplace, and community settings. Dr. Samura will share preliminary insights into how social distancing as a result of COVID-19 affects student belonging and connectedness.

Jennifer Bevan, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School of Communication. Her research has focused on how individuals in close relationships navigate health issues. She is currently co-editing a special issue in the international, interdisciplinary Journal of Special Relationships entitled "Relationships in the Time of Covid-19: Examining the Effects of the Global Pandemic on Personal Relationships." Dr. Bevan will discuss her own, preliminary research on family caregiving stress related to COVID-19 and relational dynamics, as well as anticipate how a variety of close relationships may be fundamentally impacted by the implications and edicts related to COVID-19.

Riva Tukachinsky, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the School of Communication. Her research interest lies in media psychology. She uses cognitive and social psychological models to understand how people process information in the media and the effects that media exposure has on attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors.

Megan A. Vendemia, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the School of Communication. Her research centers on the social and psychological implications of communication technology. She primarily uses quantitative methods to examine factors that make people perceive mediated information as authentic, credible, and ultimately, more influential. Their current project examines the effects of news consumption on COVID-19 protective behaviors. Data from a national survey are used to identify predictors of following CDC recommendations (e.g., social distancing) and engaging in socially undesirable precautionary behaviors (e.g., stockpiling).

Uri Maoz, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Computational Neuroscience and Psychology at Crean college and the Brain Institute. Together with students and collaborators, he studies the neural underpinnings of volition: how desires, decisions, and intentions transform into action. He also leads a large, international group of neuroscientists and philosophers who investigate how the brain enables conscious, causal control of decisions and actions. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Maoz initiated a collaboration of neuroscientists, psychologists, political scientists, law scholars, and others who have been gathering longitudinal data from over 1000 US participants weekly to biweekly since early April. We are tracking various dynamic psychological, economic, political, legal, and other trends related to the pandemic. Besides explicit questionnaires, we also employ different implicit measures to help us build a more-complete picture of the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19 on the US.

Additional Questions

For any questions not covered on this website for Research Continuity, please visit the FAQs for Research Continuity. Also, feel free to reach out to the contacts below or the Office of Research at (officeofresearch@chapman.edu)

Tom Piechota, Vice President for Research, piechota@chapman.edu, 714-628-2897

Jill Borland, Director of Sponsored Projects Service, jborland@chapman.edu, 714-628-7383

Michael Briggs, Director of Research Integrity, mibriggs@chapman.edu, 714-628-7201

Lawrence Lau, Director of Industry Alliance and Commercialization, lalau@chapman.edu, 714-628-2875