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Advanced Topic: Constitutional Principles LL.M. only (2) Law-7932
An introduction to United States Constitutional Law for foreign LL.M. students, the course surveys the constitutional structure of the United States (e.g., federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances), as well as selected key issues in civil rights and civil liberties, such freedom of speech and religion, and the guarantees of equal protection and due process.  

Antitrust Law (3) Law-7509
In a free market economy, there needs to be concern over abuses of power. Antitrust law serves that function. It has a criminal law component—identifying and prosecuting price-fixing and collusion between competitors.  It has a civil law component—dealing with how companies with dominant market positions can destroy competition from rivals, to the detriment of consumers and society.  It has a regulatory law component—allowing or preventing mergers, based on international, national, and local perspectives. While mostly focusing on US national antitrust law, the course will also consider foreign countries’ antitrust laws, and the antitrust laws specific to California. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Emphasis Certificate.

Arbitration Law (3) Law-7659
This course gives students an orientation to how arbitration works and practice in basic arbitration advocacy skills. The course will involve comprehensive study of rules and code sections as well as exposure to various arbitration providers and practical information about conducting arbitration hearings. Topics include discovery in an arbitration forum, admitting evidence, opening statements, direct and cross-examination, and closing arguments. The central philosophy of the class is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. This course is designed to enhance and improve writing, presentation, and public speaking skills. For maximum benefit of the course materials it is suggested that all students have previously completed Evidence. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice (3) Law-7518
This course will explore adjustment of the debtor/creditor relationship through the federal bankruptcy laws, beginning with background discussion on the history and purpose of insolvency laws and continuing with the sources of both secured and unsecured creditor claims.  The course will cover security interests, attachment and judgment liens, filing of the bankruptcy petition and schedules, the automatic stay, and creation of the estate and discharge.  Chapter 7 liquidation and Chapter 13 wage earner plans will both be explored in depth.  Other subjects explored will be relief of stay, dischargeability litigation and the avoiding powers of the trustee.

Business Associations LL.M. only (3) Law-7933
This course for foreign LL.M. students surveys the laws that govern U.S. business organizations including: Sole Proprietorships, Agency & Partnerships, Corporations and Limited Liability entities.  Coverage includes entity formation, duties of officers and directors, and problems of control.  The class is designed to provide students with a foundation in both the common law and the statutory systems that regulate businesses as well as the issues of policy that surround this regulation.

California Civil Procedure (3) Law-7817 California Bar Tested
This course continues the study of civil procedure with advanced focus on California's procedural structure, including ways in which California procedure differs from federal civil practice.  Areas of study include state practice in complex civil litigation, discovery, pleading, summary judgment, former adjudication and other advanced principles.  Students will be expected to analyze complex fact patterns and to discern the ways in which California procedure differs from federal practice.  Prerequisite: Civil Procedure II.  This course is for J.D. students only.

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics:  relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court.  The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

Note: Evidence with Professor Mainero covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects.  Students who take Evidence with Professor Mainero may not take the elective California Evidence course.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients.  Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law.  The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation.  Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney.  Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products,  including a client letter, a  memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested                                            The organizing idea for the text and the course is that California community property is a “classification” system; property is either community or separate property based upon the date and source of acquisition of the property.  Problems arise when spouses claim separate property interests in community property, community property interests in separate property, devote community effort to separate property, or make agreements, before or during marriage, or after date of separation or dissolution of the marriage, but before judgment is entered, on their property issues.  All of these issues, and more, from acquisition of community property to its division upon dissolution of marriage, will be explored.

Constitutional Law (4) Law-7126 California Bar Tested
This course covers the powers of the three branches of the federal government, the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, including the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States, and an introduction to issues involving equal protection.

Copyright Law and Practice (3) Law-7822
Copyright law is critical across many different arts, technologies and industries. The digital revolution has transformed how we think about this body of law.  We will examine its application to, and implications for, music, books, film and computer software, for example.    Students will learn how to interpret and apply the statutory provisions, to identify and articulate the scope of U.S. copyright protection and its limitations, the essential elements of a copyright infringement claim, the defenses and strategies available to a defendant, and the related bodies of law typically involved in copyright disputes.  The classes will focus on applying case law and the statute to various hypothetical situations with the goal of preparing students to handle the copyright issues and problems typically encountered by a lawyer in practice. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement. 

Corporate Tax I (3) Law-7613
The basic federal income tax consequences to regular corporations and their shareholders of incorporations, capital contributions, corporate operations, dividend and other distributions, stock dividends, redemptions and liquidations, the accumulated earnings tax, and the personal holding company tax.  S corporation taxation will also be briefly discussed.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for‑profit corporations.  Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate.  The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers.  The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.  Students who have completed the course in Business Associations may not enroll in this course.  

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested 
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation.  Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.  

Criminal Procedure: Practice and Professionalism (2) Law-8023
This course is designed to give the students the skills and information litigators need to know when they appear in court.  Students will understand how to independently handle misdemeanor filings, pre-trial negotiations, motions, felony preliminary hearings and misdemeanor jury trials.  This course is designed to prepare you for your spring semester externship by providing an understanding of criminal terminology, common penal and evidence code sections, and the most common type of jury trials that you will likely handle including domestic violence and driving under the influence. 

Directed Research Project (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings.  To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing.  The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required.  The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester.  Students cannot register for a Directed Research project online.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project.   Students may not make changes to the number of credits post the Add/Drop deadline for the semester.

Entertainment Industry Contracts (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors.  The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined.  Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. There is no final exam during the examination period.  This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time.  This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate and the Business Law Certificate. 

Ethics in Tax Practice (2) Law-7887 
An examination of the statutory, regulatory and ethical standards governing those who practice in the tax field, including the application of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to tax practice, Circular 230 (governing those admitted to practice before the Internal Revenue Service), and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and the Treasury Regulations governing return preparers, with lesser attention to provisions governing CPAs and other federal statutes, such as the federal conflict of interest statute.  Among the areas covered are advertising and solicitation, return preparation and advice, dealing with the Internal Revenue Service in the audit and appeals process, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and uncooperative clients.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials.  Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Note: Evidence with Professor Mainero covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects.  Students who take Evidence with Professor Mainero may not take the elective California Evidence course.

Family Law (3) Law-7542
This will be a practice oriented writing course.  There will not be a final examination. However, students will be required to submit three written assignments totaling not less than twenty pages.  These assignments are designed to mirror the experience of drafting documents typical of those generated by attorneys in the practice of Family Law.  Such assignments may include the drafting of pre-marital agreements, settlement agreements, declarations in support of applications for orders (child custody, support, restraining orders, etc.), and focused briefs on Family Law related topics.  Upon completion of this course, students will have gained practical and relevant experience transferrable to the practice of Family Law.  Student writing will be critiqued and discussed anonymously in class.  This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing requirement.

Federal Courts/Jurisdiction (3) Law-7543 
This course examines the scope of the federal judicial power and the role of the federal judiciary in our constitutional system. It considers the relationship of the federal courts to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and the relationship of the federal courts to the state courts. As such, class discussion naturally focuses on separation of powers and federalism principles. Topics may include Supreme Court jurisdiction, congressional control of federal court jurisdiction, justiciability, non-Article III courts, state sovereign immunity, federal court abstention, section 1983, federal review of state court decisions, and federal habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law.  Third year students may take this course concurrently with Constitutional Law. 

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.   

Fundamentals of In-House Corporate Practice (2) Law-7854
This is a practical skills course in practicing as an In-House Corporate Lawyer that introduces students to the fundamentals of working effectively in a high-functioning corporate law department and prepares them for a career as an In-House Corporate Counsel.  The course will focus on developing a skill set for an in-house corporate generalist addressing issues related to: corporate formation and administration, real property acquisition, facilities management (e.g., construction contracts), work force and labor issues (e.g., ADA compliance and workplace harassment/discrimination), litigation, and the management and defense of intellectual property. Students will have the opportunity to perform exercises relating to each of the substantive areas of in-house practice through actual case studies of corporate legal issues and simulating actual assignments as corporate counsel.  Outside reading consists of articles and excerpts of published materials.  Class sessions consist of lecture, class discussion, practical exercises and presentations, with some prominent in-house lawyers and general counsel as guest speakers, and networking opportunities.  This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing requirement. 

Immigration Law (2) Law-7552
This course provides an introduction into the examination of US law (constitutional, statutory, and administrative) governing the entry, presence, and expulsion of foreign nationals (aliens).  Topics include: sources of federal immigration power, immigrant and non-immigrant categories, exclusion, admission, deportability, refugees, and unauthorized migrants.

Income Tax for LL.M Students (3) Law-7618
This course addresses federal tax accounting, focusing on accounting methods and periods.  It presumes a basic familiarity with the structure of the federal income tax.  The topics covered will include the annual accounting system and its consequences, the cash receipts and disbursements method and the accrual method, capitalization and depreciation (and amortization), time value of money rules and the special treatment of interest, deferment payment transactions and the installment method of accounting, and the relationship between tax and financial accounting.  If time permits, other subjects may be addressed.   The exam will be a take home exam.  Students will also be expected to prepare and turn in written answers to selected problems each week; these will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Intellectual Property (3) Law-7555
This course surveys the primary types of intellectual property under federal and state law. It emphasizes trademarks, copyrights, and patents while also addressing unfair competition, rights of publicity, trade secrets, and protection of designs. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property.  This course is a core requirement for the Entertainment Law Certificate.  It is also an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate

International Business Litigation (2) Law-7510
This course deals with the litigation process in the United States when the subject of the litigation involves a transnational business transaction. We will examine the following topics: U.S. jurisdiction and other aspects of forum selection and forum non conveniens; service of process of a U.S. lawsuit abroad; international discovery; sovereign immunity; act of state; and enforcement of foreign judgments in American courts. Emphasis will be on acquiring practical skills in both prosecuting and defending international business litigation suits.  This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the Entertainment Law Certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

International Business Transactions (3) Law-7559
This is a three-credit survey course designed to acquaint students with some of the issues involved in the conduct of international business transactions. We will examine the various methods of doing business abroad, moving from relatively simple to progressively more involved transactions -- for example, beginning with a basic sale and financing of goods across national borders to the establishment of a productive operation abroad through foreign franchisees, technology licensing arrangements and finally, direct investment in foreign enterprises.  The last part of the course will focus on the resolution of international commercial disputes. We will study these transactions in a variety of political and economic settings -- economically developed nations, developing-country markets and non-market economies in transition. Even though there will be some discussion of national controls and international regulation of trade, for example, the World Trade Organization and the North American Free Trade Agreement, the primary focus of the course is on private international business law (sales contracts, trademark licenses, intellectual property infringements, investment contracts, etc.). We will touch on an extensive range of substantive laws, such as the law of corporations, commercial transactions and the uniform commercial code, antitrust, intellectual property (copyright, trademark, patent), conflict of laws, civil procedure, contracts, international trade as well as public international law.  Any knowledge or background in some of these areas will be helpful. However, there are no prerequisites for this course. The course is designed to help students become “practice ready.” That is, students will learn transactional skills and work with actual contracts. In addition to learning substantive laws and legal doctrine, students will also learn different strategies of negotiation. Negotiation skills will be incorporated into and seamlessly mesh with the substantive laws in different sections of the course. In this respect, students will not only learn how to draft and mark up different types of contracts but will also be exposed to different approaches to negotiation by engaging in simulated negotiations. These simulated negotiations play out in different settings – transactions, dispute resolution and other situations lawyers encounter in practice. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the International Law Certificate.

International Law & Organizations (3) Law-7558
This introductory course in international law, surveys the sources of international law and some contemporary global issues and challenges. The course introduces concepts of international law and how they achieve legitimacy through United Nations organizations and conferences, the International Court of Justice, the International Law Commission, treaty bodies, and state practice, as well as through other actors. The law of foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine are considered along with the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues.  This course counts for the International Law Emphasis Requirement and the required Public International Law Class for the Emphasis.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101 (International LL.M. only)
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Law, Lawyers, and the Legal System in Film (3) Law-7546
The class focuses on film portrayals of law, lawyers, and the legal system as a means of exploring questions of public policy, jurisprudence, professional responsibility, and even personal philosophy and psychology – all through the lens of filmic storytelling and filmmaking technique.  Topics to be discussed include the adversary system, ethical dilemmas, various lawyer-character archetypes, the jury system, the role of judges, the tension between popular notions of justice and certain legal regimes, and the strengths and limits of the legal system as a means of resolving disputes and providing remediesThis course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Legal Research & Writing LL.M. (4) Law-7909
The legal writing skills class focuses on clear, organized legal writing in English.  Students will reinforce their English writing skills through editing, grammar exercises, and writing standard legal communications such as e-mails, client letters, and an objective office memorandum.  The course also includes instruction on basic legal research methodologies, case analysis and legal reasoning.

Legal Writing Skills J.D. (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.  Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters. Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation.  In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study.  Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class.  Priority is given to students who are required to take this course. 

Local Government Law (3) Law-7576
A study of the powers of local government with attention to both general principles and California law.  Topics include the organization and operation of local government, municipal finance, land use, housing, racial segregation, policing, eminent domain, redevelopment, annexation and political geography, school districts, sprawl, suburbanization, urban revitalization and gentrification, and intergovernmental relationships.  This course blends traditional case readings with readings from urban theory, history, philosophy, economics and sociology to give students a context for understanding modern local government.  The course will have a take-home examination that counts for approximately 50% of the total grade, with the remaining percentage of the grade determined by a series of short reaction papers assigned during the semester as well as class participation.  The take-home examination will have a strict word/ page limit.  Students will be given the take-home exam assignment at the beginning of the exam period and have until the end of the exam period to complete it.  This course is an elective for the Certificate for Environment, Land Use and Real Estate Law. 

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course is an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate.  This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Mergers and Acquisitions (3) Law-7580
This is an in-depth review of the process, players, documentation, laws, rules and regulations governing the purchase, sale and combination of business entities.  Particular attention will be paid to the practical implications of certain acquisition strategies and the legal interpretation/implications of key document provisions.   Students will become familiar with the mergers and acquisitions process from initial feasibility analysis through closing of the transaction, as well as post-closing implications of certain strategic decisions by key players.  Upon completion of the course, students will have a basic familiarity with the steps required to conduct a business acquisition and/or combination and the significant legal documents which form an integral part of that process.  This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Students will practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations.  Students will learn about different approaches and theories of negotiation, develop their skills, understand their negotiating preferences and those of others, as well deal with ethical issues. Students will do simulated negotiations involving transactions, litigation and other situations lawyers may encounter in practice.  In addition to researching and preparing for the negotiations, students will draft agreements and will be asked to reflect upon and write about their learning.  This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Practice Foundations Transactions (3) Law-7657
This course will introduce students to transactional law practice by exploring the role of lawyers in executing business-related transactions.  Students will acquire a foundation for practice by participating in exercises and simulated transactions that lawyers handle in practice.  Students will practice communicating with and advising clients, drafting documents, dealing with other attorneys and handling transactions.  Students will learn how transactional lawyers add value and solve problems for clients by identifying client objectives, understanding the business context of the matter, spotting legal and business issues, evaluating options and closing a deal. Students will receive feedback about their progress and work. This course is open to 2L students, and part time 3L students who did not take this course during their second year of study.  2L students must take this course in the designated semester as assigned.

Preliminary Hearings (2) Law-8022
This course focuses on specialized, advanced topics in advocacy, and specifically on putting on and defending felony preliminary hearings in California. The study will include the timing of the hearing, the role of the defendant at the hearing, limitations on the right to a public hearing, the holding order, evidentiary rules at the hearing, and superior court review of the magistrate’s decision.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (Essay and MPRE) This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the California Rules of Professional (and relevant state statutes) in their study of ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings.  Topics include the ethical rules governing attorneys in every facet of their practice. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Real Estate Tax Planning (2) Law-7884
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, time share projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Property I, & Property II.  Taxation of Business Organization is recommended.

Real Estate Transactions (3) Law-7870
A study of various aspects of real estate transactions and financing. Topics may include contracts of sale, brokerage, buyer-seller rights and obligations, title insurance, development, commercial leasing, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, foreclosure, receivership, priorities, subordination, suretyship, securitization, tax considerations, and strategies of negotiation and drafting. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.    

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested 
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Secured Transactions (3) Law-7605 – Uniform Bar Exam Tested
"No Money Down," "0% A.P.R.," "No Payments for 24 Months." Innocent enough in their own right, each of these familiar phrases openly welcomes the consumer to the world of secured transactions. Generally speaking, a secured transaction is one in which a debtor borrows money from a creditor and designates property as collateral to secure repayment of the loan. A classic example would be the financed purchase of an automobile. Should the debtor fail to make the required payments, the secured party may take legal action or (in some instances) repossess the property. Secured transactions fuel a substantial part of the American economy. In this course, we will examine various rules governing debtor/creditor and creditor/creditor relationships, addressing several key questions: how do financial institutions protect themselves against borrower default, what happens when the debtor files for bankruptcy protection, and who wins when similarly-situated creditors must square off against each other in the fight for the debtor's vulnerable assets? Given that many of the rules governing secured transactions in personal property are found in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, we will frequently consult its provisions. In laying a core conceptual foundation, we will also address secured transactions in real property, including the ramifications of mortgaging property and the legal and equitable rights of mortgagors and mortgagees prior to and during the foreclosure process. In each session, we will apply the law to hypothetical problems presented, and as a result, students completing the course will have a knowledge base critical to the effective representation of average consumers, growing businesses, insolvent/bankrupt debtors, and sophisticated financial institutions. The course provides a solid foundation for courses in Bankruptcy Law.  For those students who might at some point consider taking the Uniform Bar Examination (UBE), this is a bar-tested course on the UBE. As of July 2019, the UBE will be the bar exam in 31 jurisdictions.

Sports Law (3) Law-7829
This course will cover selected legal issues in amateur and professional sports including player draft and option systems; labor and employment relations in professional sports; eligibility and discipline issues; agents and player representation; inter-league disputes; buying and moving teams; sex discrimination in sports; and Olympic competition.  This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. 

Tax Procedure & Administration (3) Law – 7609
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination. Prerequisites: successful completion of Evidence. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course.  Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the wait list, and your name will be added to the end of the wait list. 

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested                                                    This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes.  The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.


Bar Preparation Courses

Enrollment in Bar Preparation Courses is limited to third and fourth year students.

Advanced Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7676 California Bar Tested (Spring 2020 only)
The enrollment in Advanced Selected Topics in American Law in the Spring will give priority to students entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class, and will be a small section course with no more than fifteen (15) students per section that will focus entirely on intensive writing practice in advance of the Bar Exam. Advanced Selected Topics will thus not be offered in the Fall Semester. Alternatively, all students are eligible for Legal Analysis Workshop, which will be offered both in the Fall (two sections) and in the Spring (two sections). Each Section will be capped at 30 students.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504 California Bar Tested
This course will focus on two skills. The first is the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, and declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery.  The analysis and drafting skill will include the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems. The second skill is correctly analyzing problems in Constitutional Law, Contracts and Sales, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Federal Civil Procedure, Real Property, and Torts in the form of multiple choice questions similar to those presented on the Multistate Bar Exam.  Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year students. There will be two sections. Each section will be capped at thirty (30) students. There will be two sections also available in the Spring.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636 California Bar Tested
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies.  Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law.  This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time.  All students entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law in the fall semester, and MUST take Advanced Selected Topics in the spring semester. Because of the helpful and important nature of Selected Topics in American Law, all students are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.

Clinical Courses

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court.  Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Elder Law Clinic   

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults. The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly. In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings. The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice. Enrollment is limited to 14 students. Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure II; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Entertainment Law Clinic

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers.  Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films.  Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC; acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases.  Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Entertainment Industry Contracts.  This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.  This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Family Protection Clinic

Advanced Family Protection Clinic – Protective Order (1-3) Law-7669
This section of the Advanced Family Protection Clinic is open to students who have successfully completed the Family Protection Clinic and who have prior approval from Professor Seiden.  The credit allocation will be determined prior to registration and will reflect the amount and complexity of work to be completed by the student.  Advanced FPC students take part in community legal education and provide legal advice and limited scope representation to victims of family violence. Students may engage in trial work during their advanced clinic semester. 

Family Protection Clinic - Protective Order (3) Law-7655
This section of the Family Protection Clinic is a hands-on clinical course open to upper-level J.D. and LL.M. students. Students will study, learn, and practice client interviewing & counseling skills as well as legal research & writing while representing or providing legal advice to low-income survivors of family violence. Students will learn domestic violence and related family law and may engage in community legal education, trial preparation, affidavit writing, and/or document drafting. Weekly classes and team meetings are held at the law school. Client work is performed at the Bette & Wylie Aitken Family Protection Clinic, located within the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), approximately five miles from the law school in Anaheim. Requirements: J.D. students must be enrolled in or have passed Evidence. Enrollment is contingent upon completion of a background/conflicts check, which can be found on the Family Protection Clinic web page or on the Registrar’s web page under"Forms." Applications should be submitted by email to Professor Seiden at seiden@chapman.edu prior to or as soon after registration as possible. The FPC is a restricted withdrawal course.  The last day to add/drop falls during the first week of classes.  This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement OR the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement, but not both.  This semester, FPC-PO may be taken in place of Client Interviewing & Counseling or as an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Emphasis program.

Mediation Clinic

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation.  Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience.  Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others.  There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic.  Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. 
Note: For the Advanced Mediation Clinic, students are required to go to court at least twice each week. The new schedule for court in Riverside will be Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoon from 1:20 to 4:00. There may be some cases on those mornings too.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic enables students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent practice with actual parties and attorneys under the supervision of experienced mediators. Students work with real litigants who have filed cases in the Central Justice Center in Orange County and the Superior Court in Riverside.  Cases include, but are not limited to: Guardianship Matters, Civil Harassment Restraining Orders, Small Claims Appeals, Neighbor/Neighbor Disputes, Landlord/Tenant Conflicts, Consumer/Merchant Collections, Business/Business Disagreements, Family/Domestic Matters, Personal Injury Disputes, and Workplace Grievances. Students regularly interact with practicing attorneys, judges, and other court officers. The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning. Students will be graded on full participation in the Mediation Clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance and professionalism, class participation, and willingness to mediate.This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.
Course Requirements: The clinic meets every Monday morning on campus at 10:15 a.m. Students are required to go to court at least twice each week. Court days and times: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday mornings from 8:20 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.; and Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Mediation Clinic for Juveniles (3) Law-7354
Course Requirements: For the first couple of weeks of the clinic, we will meet on campus on Tuesday evenings at 6:00pm. Beginning in September, students will go with me to Juvenile Hall on Tuesday afternoons (5-week session), expecting to leave Chapman at 2:00pm and return by 6:00pm. After the RJH 5-week session ends, students will then go to YTEC on Thursday afternoons (5-week session), expecting to leave Chapman at 2:00pm and return by 6:00pm. Overall, we will spend a total amount of 10-weeks (either in RJH the first five weeks or YTEC the second five weeks) teaching conflict resolution skills to in-custody youth. 
The second track of this clinic is the Victim/Offender mediation program that we will conduct throughout the semester. Students must attend at least two Restorative Justice mediations throughout the semester, which could take place on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday evening at 5:30pm in Riverside County. You will be able to coordinate your schedule with the VIC/OFF mediations to make this work for your schedule. (We are working to incorporate a technology based platform so that you can participate in the mediations through technology rather than in-person.)
NOTE: There is a stipend that goes along with this clinic in order to offset any expenses for your commute to/from Riverside County. Additionally, you may also have the opportunity to work with Chapman SR undergrad students to mentor them in this program as they explore the law through this clinic.
What do we do: The Criminal Justice Dispute Resolution Clinic is a clinic based on the tenets of Restorative Justice. What is Restorative Justice? This is an approach to criminal justice that aims, through reconciliation with the victim, to repair the harm caused by the offender’s criminal behavior. Providing students with a unique opportunity to implement Restorative Justice and Restorative Practice, this clinic offers two approaches. First, clinic students will teach dispute resolution to in-custody juveniles, as well as teach them peer mediation skills, giving them tools to react differently to the conflicts with which they are confronted. Second, clinic students participate in Restorative Justice mediations that emphasize Restorative Practice. This aspect of the clinic collaborates with the Probation Department and District Attorney’s Office and allows for clinic students to mediate cases between victims and youth-offenders, implementing Restorative Practice that repairs the relationship through accountability, remorse, and restorative action that may lead to forgiveness. If the parties reach a resolution, students draft settlement agreements, which, if satisfied by the offender, helps the offender avoid probation and avoid potential time in juvenile hall while learning the importance of relational foundations. Clinic students will gain valuable experience in the criminal justice system, unique client-counseling-opportunities, and hands-on mediation experience. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Tax Clinic

Tax Procedure and Administration Clinic (1) Law-7612
The clinical component of the Tax Procedure and Administration course allows students to handle actual tax controversy cases for low income taxpayers on a pro bono basis before the IRS and in U.S. Tax Court under special rules of student practice.  Students learn the practical application of tax procedures and handle all aspects of their cases, including trial if necessary.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and concurrent enrollment in Tax Procedure and Administration. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Diversity and Social Justice Forum Staff (1) Law-7936
Diversity and Social Justice Board (1) Law-7937
The Diversity and Social Justice Journal is a student-run scholarly publication at Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law, dedicated to providing a forum that can give expression and representation to a wide spectrum of progressive and diverse voices at Chapman.
Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows:
1. staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester for a total of two units; and,
2. board members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester of participation for a total of two units.

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653)
Externships offer law school credit for practical experience working for a judge; District Attorney or Public Defender; government agency, non-profit, private law firm or corporation. Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical Experiential Course. For information on how to obtain an externship, visit http://www.chapman.edu/law/externships/index.aspx.

Externships can be taken for between 1 and 5 units during the school year and for between 1 and 6 units over the summer, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” which can be taken for 10 units. For details on how many hours must be worked per unit, as well as how many externships can be taken in all, see the Externship Handbook, available in room 350 or at the above link.  

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 1 week before the start of the summer session.  Applications are found at the end of the Externship Handbook.  If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course within 1 week.  In addition to fieldwork, students must participate in a one-time “boot camp” (see times listed below). 

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. Students are required to produce a student note as a Directed Research project under the direction of a faculty member during their first year on the Law Review. Students may receive up to three units of credit for Directed Research during the spring semester. Students are also registered for one unit of credit in the spring semester of the first year of service on Law Review which is graded by the Law Review's faculty adviser.  Thereafter, subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty adviser, senior editors may receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation. 

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Experiential Course competitions are an important component of legal education.  Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism.  Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiations, Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional level of competition, or three units for trial and appellate competitions outside the law school.  This course may satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement with a two credit minimum. Only Moot Court Competitions may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.

+ - Spring 2020

Please note, the Spring 2020 class schedule is tentative and is subject to change. Please contact the Law Registrar's Office with any questions. 

Advanced Topic: Constitutional Principles LL.M. only (2) Law-7932
An introduction to United States Constitutional Law for foreign LL.M. students, the course surveys the constitutional structure of the United States (e.g., federalism, separation of powers, checks and balances), as well as selected key issues in civil rights and civil liberties, such freedom of speech and religion, and the guarantees of equal protection and due process.  

Antitrust Law (3) Law-7509
In a free market economy, there needs to be concern over abuses of power. Antitrust law serves that function. It has a criminal law component—identifying and prosecuting price-fixing and collusion between competitors.  It has a civil law component—dealing with how companies with dominant market positions can destroy competition from rivals, to the detriment of consumers and society.  It has a regulatory law component—allowing or preventing mergers, based on international, national, and local perspectives. While mostly focusing on US national antitrust law, the course will also consider foreign countries’ antitrust laws, and the antitrust laws specific to California. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Emphasis Certificate.

Arbitration Law (3) Law-7659
This course gives students an orientation to how arbitration works and practice in basic arbitration advocacy skills. The course will involve comprehensive study of rules and code sections as well as exposure to various arbitration providers and practical information about conducting arbitration hearings. Topics include discovery in an arbitration forum, admitting evidence, opening statements, direct and cross-examination, and closing arguments. The central philosophy of the class is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. This course is designed to enhance and improve writing, presentation, and public speaking skills. For maximum benefit of the course materials it is suggested that all students have previously completed Evidence. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement. Enrollment will be limited to 20 students.

Bankruptcy Procedure and Practice (3) Law-7518
This course will explore adjustment of the debtor/creditor relationship through the federal bankruptcy laws, beginning with background discussion on the history and purpose of insolvency laws and continuing with the sources of both secured and unsecured creditor claims.  The course will cover security interests, attachment and judgment liens, filing of the bankruptcy petition and schedules, the automatic stay, and creation of the estate and discharge.  Chapter 7 liquidation and Chapter 13 wage earner plans will both be explored in depth.  Other subjects explored will be relief of stay, dischargeability litigation and the avoiding powers of the trustee.

Business Associations LL.M. only (3) Law-7933
This course for foreign LL.M. students surveys the laws that govern U.S. business organizations including: Sole Proprietorships, Agency & Partnerships, Corporations and Limited Liability entities.  Coverage includes entity formation, duties of officers and directors, and problems of control.  The class is designed to provide students with a foundation in both the common law and the statutory systems that regulate businesses as well as the issues of policy that surround this regulation.

California Civil Procedure (3) Law-7817 California Bar Tested
This course continues the study of civil procedure with advanced focus on California's procedural structure, including ways in which California procedure differs from federal civil practice.  Areas of study include state practice in complex civil litigation, discovery, pleading, summary judgment, former adjudication and other advanced principles.  Students will be expected to analyze complex fact patterns and to discern the ways in which California procedure differs from federal practice.  Prerequisite: Civil Procedure II.  This course is for J.D. students only.

California Evidence (3) Law-7318 California Bar Tested
This course addresses both civil and criminal provisions of the California Evidence Code, examining among many topics:  relevance, character evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, impeachment, expert testimony, and privileges. The course focuses on the California Evidence Code, with a practical focus on tactical and procedural introduction of evidence at trial in state court.  The class will also cover differences between California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Prerequisite: Evidence.

Note: Evidence with Professor Mainero covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects.  Students who take Evidence with Professor Mainero may not take the elective California Evidence course.

Client Interviewing and Counseling (3) Law-7520
Students will learn and practice skills involved in interviewing and counseling clients.  Through the course of the semester, students will take one simulated case from the initial phase of gathering and evaluating facts supplied by a client, conduct substantive legal research, write a memorandum to the client file, and provide oral and written advice to the client based on consideration of facts and applicable law.  The course will focus on interpersonal aspects of client relationships as well as ethical problems that may arise in the context of client representation.  Students participate in simulated interviews and counseling sessions, portraying both client and attorney.  Students will be videotaped in at least one interview or counseling session and will complete several written products,  including a client letter, a  memo to the file, and papers analyzing the lawyering process from the perspective of both attorney and client. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.  This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution.

Community Property (2) Law-7302 California Bar Tested                                            The organizing idea for the text and the course is that California community property is a “classification” system; property is either community or separate property based upon the date and source of acquisition of the property.  Problems arise when spouses claim separate property interests in community property, community property interests in separate property, devote community effort to separate property, or make agreements, before or during marriage, or after date of separation or dissolution of the marriage, but before judgment is entered, on their property issues.  All of these issues, and more, from acquisition of community property to its division upon dissolution of marriage, will be explored.

Constitutional Law (4) Law-7126 California Bar Tested
This course covers the powers of the three branches of the federal government, the relationship of the branches of the federal government to each other and to the States, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, including the effect of the Fourteenth Amendment on the application of the Bill of Rights to the States, and an introduction to issues involving equal protection.

Copyright Law and Practice (3) Law-7822
Copyright law is critical across many different arts, technologies and industries. The digital revolution has transformed how we think about this body of law.  We will examine its application to, and implications for, music, books, film and computer software, for example.    Students will learn how to interpret and apply the statutory provisions, to identify and articulate the scope of U.S. copyright protection and its limitations, the essential elements of a copyright infringement claim, the defenses and strategies available to a defendant, and the related bodies of law typically involved in copyright disputes.  The classes will focus on applying case law and the statute to various hypothetical situations with the goal of preparing students to handle the copyright issues and problems typically encountered by a lawyer in practice. This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement. 

Corporate Tax I (3) Law-7613
The basic federal income tax consequences to regular corporations and their shareholders of incorporations, capital contributions, corporate operations, dividend and other distributions, stock dividends, redemptions and liquidations, the accumulated earnings tax, and the personal holding company tax.  S corporation taxation will also be briefly discussed.

Corporations (3) Law-7145 California Bar Tested
This course provides a basic understanding of both closely held and publicly held for‑profit corporations.  Particular attention is given to the way in which corporations organize and operate.  The course also examines the respective roles, relationships, responsibilities, and liability exposure of shareholders, directors and officers.  The study of corporate litigation and regulation under key portions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and the rules and regulations of the S.E.C. is included.  Students who have completed the course in Business Associations may not enroll in this course.  

Criminal Procedure/Police Practices (3) Law-7301 California Bar Tested 
This course provides a close examination of the laws of criminal investigation.  Topics include constitutional limits on arrests and stops, search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, right to counsel, and the privilege against self-incrimination.  

Criminal Procedure: Practice and Professionalism (2) Law-8023
This course is designed to give the students the skills and information litigators need to know when they appear in court.  Students will understand how to independently handle misdemeanor filings, pre-trial negotiations, motions, felony preliminary hearings and misdemeanor jury trials.  This course is designed to prepare you for your spring semester externship by providing an understanding of criminal terminology, common penal and evidence code sections, and the most common type of jury trials that you will likely handle including domestic violence and driving under the influence. 

Directed Research Project (1-3; 12 and ½ pages minimum per credit based on standard format) Law-7850
Courses are available to 2-4Ls only to study and research topics which are not provided for by regular curricular offerings.  To register for Directed Research, students must complete a Directed Research form and submit the completed form to the Registrar’s Office for processing.  The signatures of the supervising full-time professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs are required.  The completed Directed Research form must be submitted to the Registrar’s office by the given Add/Drop deadline for the semester.  Students cannot register for a Directed Research project online.  Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.6 at the end of their first year to partake in a Directed Research project. Students may not make changes to the number of credits post the Add/Drop deadline for the semester.

Entertainment Industry Contracts (3) Law-7830
This course provides a detailed review and analysis of the contracts involved in the making of a feature film and other media. Students will have hands-on experience with contracts from the inception of an idea to acquiring rights and hiring writers, directors and actors.  The attorney’s role throughout the process of creating media will be examined.  Students draft and negotiate contracts, draft client correspondence, and create client files. The skills learned in this course are applicable to drafting and negotiating transactions in many areas of law. There is no final exam during the examination period.  This course may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements. Note: one course cannot satisfy more than one requirement at the same time.  This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate and the Business Law Certificate. 

Ethics in Tax Practice (2) Law-7887 
An examination of the statutory, regulatory and ethical standards governing those who practice in the tax field, including the application of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct to tax practice, Circular 230 (governing those admitted to practice before the Internal Revenue Service), and provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and the Treasury Regulations governing return preparers, with lesser attention to provisions governing CPAs and other federal statutes, such as the federal conflict of interest statute.  Among the areas covered are advertising and solicitation, return preparation and advice, dealing with the Internal Revenue Service in the audit and appeals process, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and uncooperative clients.

Evidence (4) Law-7142 California Bar Tested
This course covers the standards regulating admissibility of evidence in both criminal and civil trials.  Special emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Note: Evidence with Professor Mainero covers both the Federal Rules of Evidence and the California Code, and thus covers two bar tested subjects.  Students who take Evidence with Professor Mainero may not take the elective California Evidence course.

Family Law (3) Law-7542
This will be a practice oriented writing course.  There will not be a final examination. However, students will be required to submit three written assignments totaling not less than twenty pages.  These assignments are designed to mirror the experience of drafting documents typical of those generated by attorneys in the practice of Family Law.  Such assignments may include the drafting of pre-marital agreements, settlement agreements, declarations in support of applications for orders (child custody, support, restraining orders, etc.), and focused briefs on Family Law related topics.  Upon completion of this course, students will have gained practical and relevant experience transferrable to the practice of Family Law.  Student writing will be critiqued and discussed anonymously in class.  This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing requirement.

Federal Courts/Jurisdiction (3) Law-7543  
This course examines the scope of the federal judicial power and the role of the federal judiciary in our constitutional system. It considers the relationship of the federal courts to the legislative and executive branches of the federal government, and the relationship of the federal courts to the state courts. As such, class discussion naturally focuses on separation of powers and federalism principles. Topics may include Supreme Court jurisdiction, congressional control of federal court jurisdiction, justiciability, non-Article III courts, state sovereign immunity, federal court abstention, section 1983, federal review of state court decisions, and federal habeas corpus. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law.  Third year students may take this course concurrently with Constitutional Law. 

Federal Income Tax (3) Law-7133
This course introduces students to the system of federal income taxation of individuals. The tax system is studied with emphasis on basic concepts rather than detailed computations. Significant attention is given to the public policy served by various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. Primary consideration is given to principles and policies relating to the taxation of individuals including procedure, income, deductions, gains and losses, and transactional aspects of income taxation. The Internal Revenue Code and Regulations are emphasized. All full time students are required to take this course during their second year of law study; part time students may take it during their second or third year of law study. This course is a core requirement for the Certificate in Taxation.   

Fundamentals of In-House Corporate Practice (2) Law-7854
This is a practical skills course in practicing as an In-House Corporate Lawyer that introduces students to the fundamentals of working effectively in a high-functioning corporate law department and prepares them for a career as an In-House Corporate Counsel.  The course will focus on developing a skill set for an in-house corporate generalist addressing issues related to: corporate formation and administration, real property acquisition, facilities management (e.g., construction contracts), work force and labor issues (e.g., ADA compliance and workplace harassment/discrimination), litigation, and the management and defense of intellectual property. Students will have the opportunity to perform exercises relating to each of the substantive areas of in-house practice through actual case studies of corporate legal issues and simulating actual assignments as corporate counsel.  Outside reading consists of articles and excerpts of published materials.  Class sessions consist of lecture, class discussion, practical exercises and presentations, with some prominent in-house lawyers and general counsel as guest speakers, and networking opportunities.  This course will satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing requirement. 

Immigration Law (2) Law-7552
This course provides an introduction into the examination of US law (constitutional, statutory, and administrative) governing the entry, presence, and expulsion of foreign nationals (aliens).  Topics include: sources of federal immigration power, immigrant and non-immigrant categories, exclusion, admission, deportability, refugees, and unauthorized migrants.

Income Tax for LL.M Students (3) Law-7618
This course addresses federal tax accounting, focusing on accounting methods and periods.  It presumes a basic familiarity with the structure of the federal income tax.  The topics covered will include the annual accounting system and its consequences, the cash receipts and disbursements method and the accrual method, capitalization and depreciation (and amortization), time value of money rules and the special treatment of interest, deferment payment transactions and the installment method of accounting, and the relationship between tax and financial accounting.  If time permits, other subjects may be addressed.   The exam will be a take home exam.  Students will also be expected to prepare and turn in written answers to selected problems each week; these will be graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Intellectual Property (3) Law-7555
This course surveys the primary types of intellectual property under federal and state law. It emphasizes trademarks, copyrights, and patents while also addressing unfair competition, rights of publicity, trade secrets, and protection of designs. The course analyzes the rights and remedies associated with each type of intellectual property that it covers, as well as the relationships between different types of intellectual property.  This course is a core requirement for the Entertainment Law Certificate.  It is also an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate

International Business Litigation (2) Law-7510 
This course deals with the litigation process in the United States when the subject of the litigation involves a transnational business transaction. We will examine the following topics: U.S. jurisdiction and other aspects of forum selection and forum non conveniens; service of process of a U.S. lawsuit abroad; international discovery; sovereign immunity; act of state; and enforcement of foreign judgments in American courts. Emphasis will be on acquiring practical skills in both prosecuting and defending international business litigation suits.  This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the Entertainment Law Certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

International Business Transactions (3) Law-7559
This is a three-credit survey course designed to acquaint students with some of the issues involved in the conduct of international business transactions. We will examine the various methods of doing business abroad, moving from relatively simple to progressively more involved transactions -- for example, beginning with a basic sale and financing of goods across national borders to the establishment of a productive operation abroad through foreign franchisees, technology licensing arrangements and finally, direct investment in foreign enterprises.  The last part of the course will focus on the resolution of international commercial disputes. We will study these transactions in a variety of political and economic settings -- economically developed nations, developing-country markets and non-market economies in transition. Even though there will be some discussion of national controls and international regulation of trade, for example, the World Trade Organization and the North American Free Trade Agreement, the primary focus of the course is on private international business law (sales contracts, trademark licenses, intellectual property infringements, investment contracts, etc.). We will touch on an extensive range of substantive laws, such as the law of corporations, commercial transactions and the uniform commercial code, antitrust, intellectual property (copyright, trademark, patent), conflict of laws, civil procedure, contracts, international trade as well as public international law.  Any knowledge or background in some of these areas will be helpful. However, there are no prerequisites for this course. The course is designed to help students become “practice ready.” That is, students will learn transactional skills and work with actual contracts. In addition to learning substantive laws and legal doctrine, students will also learn different strategies of negotiation. Negotiation skills will be incorporated into and seamlessly mesh with the substantive laws in different sections of the course. In this respect, students will not only learn how to draft and mark up different types of contracts but will also be exposed to different approaches to negotiation by engaging in simulated negotiations. These simulated negotiations play out in different settings – transactions, dispute resolution and other situations lawyers encounter in practice. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement. This course is an approved elective for the Business Law Certificate and the International Law Certificate.

International Law & Organizations (3) Law-7558
This introductory course in international law, surveys the sources of international law and some contemporary global issues and challenges. The course introduces concepts of international law and how they achieve legitimacy through United Nations organizations and conferences, the International Court of Justice, the International Law Commission, treaty bodies, and state practice, as well as through other actors. The law of foreign sovereign immunity and the act of state doctrine are considered along with the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues.  This course counts for the International Law Emphasis Requirement and the required Public International Law Class for the Emphasis.

Introduction to American Law (2) Law-7101 (International LL.M. only)
Introduction to American Law is a course designed for LL.M. students who received their law degrees from foreign, non-common law universities. The course provides an overview of various areas of the American legal system and legal profession. It is a basic introduction to the common law and statutory law in the U.S. in both the federal and state systems. It is designed to assist LL.M. students’ understanding of American law and legal issues so as to enhance their experience in their studies at the School of Law.

Law, Lawyers, and thLegal System in Film (3) Law-7546
The class focuses on film portrayals of law, lawyers, and the legal system as a means of exploring questions of public policy, jurisprudence, professional responsibility, and even personal philosophy and psychology – all through the lens of filmic storytelling and filmmaking technique.  Topics to be discussed include the adversary system, ethical dilemmas, various lawyer-character archetypes, the jury system, the role of judges, the tension between popular notions of justice and certain legal regimes, and the strengths and limits of the legal system as a means of resolving disputes and providing remedies.  This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Legal Research & Writing LL.M. (4) Law-7909
The legal writing skills class focuses on clear, organized legal writing in English.  Students will reinforce their English writing skills through editing, grammar exercises, and writing standard legal communications such as e-mails, client letters, and an objective office memorandum.  The course also includes instruction on basic legal research methodologies, case analysis and legal reasoning.

Legal Writing Skills J.D. (3) Law-7575
This course is designed to develop legal writing skills needed for success in law school, on the bar examination, and in practice.  Among others, the course will review and develop skills needed to prepare case briefs, answers to law school essay exam questions, bar examination performance tests, internal memoranda, briefs, and client letters. Note: Any students who received a grade below 2.0 in Legal Research and Writing I and/or Legal Research and Writing II or if recommended by the LRW professors must take this course as a condition of graduation.  In addition, students who are required to take this course must do so during their second year of study. Prior approval must be obtained for all other students seeking to enroll in this class. Priority is given to students who are required to take this course. 

Local Government Law (3) Law-7576
A study of the powers of local government with attention to both general principles and California law.  Topics include the organization and operation of local government, municipal finance, land use, housing, racial segregation, policing, eminent domain, redevelopment, annexation and political geography, school districts, sprawl, suburbanization, urban revitalization and gentrification, and intergovernmental relationships.  This course blends traditional case readings with readings from urban theory, history, philosophy, economics and sociology to give students a context for understanding modern local government.  The course will have a take-home examination that counts for approximately 50% of the total grade, with the remaining percentage of the grade determined by a series of short reaction papers assigned during the semester as well as class participation.  The take-home examination will have a strict word/ page limit.  Students will be given the take-home exam assignment at the beginning of the exam period and have until the end of the exam period to complete it. This course is an elective for the Certificate for Environment, Land Use and Real Estate Law. 

Mediation (3) Law-7581
This course focuses on different theories and approaches to mediation. Mediation is gaining in importance as a mechanism for parties to heal differences without the expense and trauma of litigation. The competent practitioner should understand how mediation works and how to represent clients effectively in a mediation setting. Students in this course have an opportunity to function as both advocates and mediators, using a variety of techniques to resolve disputes. The course grade is based primarily on papers assigned by the instructor. This course is an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Mergers and Acquisitions (3) Law-7580
This is an in-depth review of the process, players, documentation, laws, rules and regulations governing the purchase, sale and combination of business entities.  Particular attention will be paid to the practical implications of certain acquisition strategies and the legal interpretation/implications of key document provisions.   Students will become familiar with the mergers and acquisitions process from initial feasibility analysis through closing of the transaction, as well as post-closing implications of certain strategic decisions by key players.  Upon completion of the course, students will have a basic familiarity with the steps required to conduct a business acquisition and/or combination and the significant legal documents which form an integral part of that process.  This course is an approved elective for the Business Law certificate. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement.

Negotiations (3) Law-7816
Students will practice preparing for and conducting legal negotiations.  Students will learn about different approaches and theories of negotiation, develop their skills, understand their negotiating preferences and those of others, as well deal with ethical issues. Students will do simulated negotiations involving transactions, litigation and other situations lawyers may encounter in practice.  In addition to researching and preparing for the negotiations, students will draft agreements and will be asked to reflect upon and write about their learning.  This course is a core requirement for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Certificate. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Practice Foundations Transactions (3) Law-7657
This course will introduce students to transactional law practice by exploring the role of lawyers in executing business-related transactions.  Students will acquire a foundation for practice by participating in exercises and simulated transactions that lawyers handle in practice.  Students will practice communicating with and advising clients, drafting documents, dealing with other attorneys and handling transactions.  Students will learn how transactional lawyers add value and solve problems for clients by identifying client objectives, understanding the business context of the matter, spotting legal and business issues, evaluating options and closing a deal. Students will receive feedback about their progress and work. This course is open to 2L students, and part time 3L students who did not take this course during their second year of study.  2L students must take this course in the designated semester as assigned.

Preliminary Hearings (2) Law-8022
This course focuses on specialized, advanced topics in advocacy, and specifically on putting on and defending felony preliminary hearings in California. The study will include the timing of the hearing, the role of the defendant at the hearing, limitations on the right to a public hearing, the holding order, evidentiary rules at the hearing, and superior court review of the magistrate’s decision.

Professional Responsibility (2) Law-7139 California Bar Tested (Essay and MPRE) This course examines the law governing the practice of law. Students will focus on the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the California Rules of Professional (and relevant state statutes) in their study of ethics problems, cases, professional responsibility opinions, and other readings.  Topics include the ethical rules governing attorneys in every facet of their practice. This course also explores when lawyers must either subordinate their own moral judgment to that of their clients or whistle-blow and violate what would otherwise be protected client confidences.

Real Estate Tax Planning (2) Law-7884
Tax planning issues for those who develop and/or operate real estate, including choice of business entity, financing techniques and syndications, handling of pre-opening expenditures, capital gain/loss issues, selling or disposing of the property, charitable easements, depreciation and amortization, repairs and capitalization, tax shelter rules (at risk and passive loss rules), and special concerns with rehabilitation credits, low income housing, condominiums, timeshare projects, and homeowners associations. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Property I, & Property II. Taxation of Business Organization is recommended.

Real Estate Transactions (3) Law-7870
A study of various aspects of real estate transactions and financing. Topics may include contracts of sale, brokerage, buyer-seller rights and obligations, title insurance, development, commercial leasing, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, foreclosure, receivership, priorities, subordination, suretyship, securitization, tax considerations, and strategies of negotiation and drafting. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Environmental Law, Land Use, and Real Estate Law.    

Remedies (3) Law-7328 California Bar Tested 
This course presents students with an analysis of the judicial remedies available in the American system of jurisprudence. The course is designed to familiarize students with the principles of the law of damages, the law of restitution, and equity and equitable remedies.

Secured Transactions (3) Law-7605 – Uniform Bar Exam Tested
"No Money Down," "0% A.P.R.," "No Payments for 24 Months." Innocent enough in their own right, each of these familiar phrases openly welcomes the consumer to the world of secured transactions. Generally speaking, a secured transaction is one in which a debtor borrows money from a creditor and designates property as collateral to secure repayment of the loan. A classic example would be the financed purchase of an automobile. Should the debtor fail to make the required payments, the secured party may take legal action or (in some instances) repossess the property. Secured transactions fuel a substantial part of the American economy. In this course, we will examine various rules governing debtor/creditor and creditor/creditor relationships, addressing several key questions: how do financial institutions protect themselves against borrower default, what happens when the debtor files for bankruptcy protection, and who wins when similarly-situated creditors must square off against each other in the fight for the debtor's vulnerable assets? Given that many of the rules governing secured transactions in personal property are found in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, we will frequently consult its provisions. In laying a core conceptual foundation, we will also address secured transactions in real property, including the ramifications of mortgaging property and the legal and equitable rights of mortgagors and mortgagees prior to and during the foreclosure process. In each session, we will apply the law to hypothetical problems presented, and as a result, students completing the course will have a knowledge base critical to the effective representation of average consumers, growing businesses, insolvent/bankrupt debtors, and sophisticated financial institutions. The course provides a solid foundation for courses in Bankruptcy Law.  For those students who might at some point consider taking the Uniform Bar Examination (UBE), this is a bar-tested course on the UBE. As of July 2019, the UBE will be the bar exam in 31 jurisdictions.

Sports Law (3) Law-7829
This course will cover selected legal issues in amateur and professional sports including player draft and option systems; labor and employment relations in professional sports; eligibility and discipline issues; agents and player representation; inter-league disputes; buying and moving teams; sex discrimination in sports; and Olympic competition.  This course is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law certificate. 

Tax Procedure & Administration (3) Law – 7609
A study of administrative procedures and taxpayer rights and remedies in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service, including assessment procedures; refund procedures; administrative appeals, conference and settlement procedures; interest; collection procedures, including tax liens and levies on property; transferee liability; limitation periods and their mitigation; burden of proof; choice of forum; IRS summons; requests for rulings and technical advice; and civil penalties. Prerequisite: Federal Income Tax.

Trial Practice (3) Law-7617
This is a practical skills course in advocacy which introduces students to the fundamental components of a typical civil and criminal trial. It requires students to perform exercises involving each component, and try a mock civil or criminal case from provided problem materials. The course requires student participation in discrete exercises, including jury voir dire, opening and closing statements, and direct and cross-examination. Prerequisites: successful completion of Evidence. This is a core requirement in the Certificate in Advocacy and Dispute Resolution. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Trial Practice with Judge Rogan - must attend the first class meeting or you will be dropped from the course.  Additionally, if you are late for the first class, you will be replaced with the first name on the waitlist, and your name will be added to the end of the waitlist. 

Wills and Trusts (3) Law-7334 California Bar Tested                                                    This course examines rules pertaining to intestate succession; testamentary dispositions; execution, modification, and revocation of wills, testamentary capacity and will contests; interpretation of wills; protection of spouse and children; and the use of will substitutes.  The creation, types, and characteristics of trusts are also examined, including coverage of the construction of trusts, trust administration, and wealth transfer taxation.


Bar Preparation Courses

Enrollment in Bar Preparation Courses is limited to third and fourth year students.

Advanced Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7676 California Bar Tested (Spring 2020 only)
The enrollment in Advanced Selected Topics in American Law in the Spring will give priority to students entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class, and will be a small section course with no more than fifteen (15) students per section that will focus entirely on intensive writing practice in advance of the Bar Exam. Advanced Selected Topics will thus not be offered in the Fall Semester. Alternatively, all students are eligible for Legal Analysis Workshop, which will be offered both in the Fall (two sections) and in the Spring (two sections). Each Section will be capped at 30 students.

Legal Analysis Workshop (3) Law-7504 California Bar Tested
This course will focus on two skills. The first is the analysis and drafting of legal documents commonly prepared during the first few years of law practice, including memoranda, briefs, and declarations, separate statements in support of motions for summary judgment/adjudication, discovery plans, and written discovery.  The analysis and drafting skill will include the identification of client issues and the use of case precedent to predict the outcome of client problems. The second skill is correctly analyzing problems in Constitutional Law, Contracts and Sales, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Federal Civil Procedure, Real Property, and Torts in the form of multiple choice questions similar to those presented on the Multistate Bar Exam.  Enrollment in this course is limited to third and fourth year students. There will be two sections. Each section will be capped at thirty (30) students. There will be two sections also available in the Spring.

Selected Topics in American Law (3) Law-7636 California Bar Tested
This is a skills-development course that provides students with an intensive substantive review of selected legal material routinely tested on the bar exam and relevant to law practice, including contracts, torts, civil procedure, criminal law and procedure, real property, evidence, corporations, constitutional law, professional responsibility, wills and trusts, community property, and remedies.  Through the use of problems and exercises in a bar exam format, students will become familiar with the techniques for analyzing, organizing, and writing essay questions based on California law.  This is not a substitute for a bar review course, but a course on how to write good legal analysis in a particular area in a short window of time.  All students entering their final year of law study ranked in the bottom 25% of their class MUST take Selected Topics in American Law in the fall semester, and MUST take Advanced Selected Topics in the spring semester. Because of the helpful and important nature of Selected Topics in American Law, all students are strongly encouraged to enroll even if it is not required.

Clinical Courses

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic

Constitutional Jurisprudence Clinic (3) Law-7828
This clinical program provides students an opportunity to work on pending litigation representing clients or drafting amicus curiae briefs in high profile cases raising significant issues of constitutional law. Depending on the availability and current status of cases, students will, under the supervision of the course instructor or cooperating counsel, draft briefs for filing with the United States Supreme Court.  Students may also have the opportunity to prepare initial case strategy, conduct client interviews, research legal issues, draft a complaint and prepare it for filing, draft discovery plans and requests, prepare summary judgment motions, draft appellate briefs, and perhaps, and, depending on the jurisdiction, argue a motion before the trial court or the case before an appellate court. This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements at the same time.

Elder Law Clinic   

Elder Law Clinic (3) Law-7565
This clinical class teaches the theory and practice of elder law, which focuses on the legal problems of older adults. The class covers health care decision making, medical ethics and end-of-life issues, public benefits for the elderly, Medicaid planning, mental capacity issues and conservatorships for the elderly, property management for the elderly, and ethical problems that arise when representing the elderly. In addition to the classroom component, students work directly with clients and engage in interviewing, counseling, preparation of draft and final documents, and possible representation of clients in administrative hearings. The class is useful for students interested in the growing practice area of elder law or in a general practice that includes representing elderly clients. The class develops legal skills useful in almost any practice. Enrollment is limited to 14 students. Prerequisites: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in Evidence and Civil Procedure II; willingness to become a Certified Law Student. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course requirement.

Entertainment Law Clinic

Entertainment Law Clinic (3) Law-7631
This course will provide students with the opportunity to work with low budget independent filmmakers.  Students conduct client interviews with Directors and Producers who are about to begin production on feature length films.  Students prepare documents and contracts for 1-6 films each semester, including: forming an LLC; acquisition of underlying rights; employment contracts for director, producer, actors and crew; location agreements and releases.  Students communicate directly with the filmmaker, prepare briefing memoranda on issues unique to each film, and create client files. Students will meet to discuss drafting challenges and issues and the role of the production attorney in advising a filmmaker or production company. Prerequisite: Entertainment Industry Contracts.  This course will satisfy the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement OR the Experiential Course Requirement; one course cannot satisfy both requirements.  This is an approved elective for the Entertainment Law Certificate.

Family Protection Clinic

Advanced Family Protection Clinic – Protective Order (1-3) Law-7669
This section of the Advanced Family Protection Clinic is open to students who have successfully completed the Family Protection Clinic and who have prior approval from Professor Seiden.  The credit allocation will be determined prior to registration and will reflect the amount and complexity of work to be completed by the student.  Advanced FPC students take part in community legal education and provide legal advice and limited scope representation to victims of family violence. Students may engage in trial work during their advanced clinic semester. 

Family Protection Clinic - Protective Order (3) Law-7655
This section of the Family Protection Clinic is a hands-on clinical course open to upper-level J.D. and LL.M. students. Students will study, learn, and practice client interviewing & counseling skills as well as legal research & writing while representing or providing legal advice to low-income survivors of family violence. Students will learn domestic violence and related family law and may engage in community legal education, trial preparation, affidavit writing, and/or document drafting. Weekly classes and team meetings are held at the law school. Client work is performed at the Bette & Wylie Aitken Family Protection Clinic, located within the Orange County Family Justice Center (OCFJC), approximately five miles from the law school in Anaheim. Requirements: J.D. students must be enrolled in or have passed Evidence. Enrollment is contingent upon completion of a background/conflicts check, which can be found on the Family Protection Clinic web page or on the Registrar’s web page under"Forms." Applications should be submitted by email to Professor Seiden at seiden@chapman.edu prior to or as soon after registration as possible. The FPC is a restricted withdrawal course.  The last day to add/drop falls during the first week of classes.  This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement OR the Practice-Oriented Writing Requirement, but not both.  This semester, FPC-PO may be taken in place of Client Interviewing & Counseling or as an approved elective for the Advocacy and Dispute Resolution Emphasis program.

Mediation Clinic

Advanced Mediation Clinic – (1-2) Law-7849
The Advanced Mediation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have completed a semester in the Mediation Clinic to continue mediating court cases. Students in the advanced clinic seek ways to expand their mediation skills by working with mediation practitioners and exploring various techniques employed in mediation.  Advanced clinic students co-mediate with Mediation Clinic students, providing assistance and guidance in the early stages of the Mediation Clinic experience.  Through this practice, advanced clinical students develop their mediation skills while teaching others.  There is no weekly classroom meeting for students in the Advanced Mediation Clinic.  Students meet regularly with clinic faculty during the semester and submit weekly journal entries for the cases mediated. 
Note: For the Advanced Mediation Clinic, students are required to go to court at least twice each week. The new schedule for court in Riverside will be Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday afternoon from 1:20 to 4:00. There may be some cases on those mornings too.

Mediation Clinic (3) Law-7330
The Mediation Clinic enables students who have completed the Mediation course, or an equivalent course, to use and develop their skills as mediators through frequent practice with actual parties and attorneys under the supervision of experienced mediators. Students work with real litigants who have filed cases in the Central Justice Center in Orange County and the Superior Court in Riverside.  Cases include, but are not limited to: Guardianship Matters, Civil Harassment Restraining Orders, Small Claims Appeals, Neighbor/Neighbor Disputes, Landlord/Tenant Conflicts, Consumer/Merchant Collections, Business/Business Disagreements, Family/Domestic Matters, Personal Injury Disputes, and Workplace Grievances. Students regularly interact with practicing attorneys, judges, and other court officers. The Mediation Clinic requires students to serve as mediators in court and to attend class each Monday morning. Students will be graded on full participation in the Mediation Clinic including, weekly journal assignments, regular court attendance and professionalism, class participation, and willingness to mediate.This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.
Course Requirements
: The clinic meets every Monday morning on campus at 10:15 a.m. Students are required to go to court at least twice each week. Court days and times: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday mornings from 8:20 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.; and Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoons from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Mediation Clinic for Juveniles (3) Law-7354 
Course Requirements: For the first couple of weeks of the clinic, we will meet on campus on Tuesday evenings at 6:00pm. Beginning in September, students will go with me to Juvenile Hall on Tuesday afternoons (5-week session), expecting to leave Chapman at 2:00pm and return by 6:00pm. After the RJH 5-week session ends, students will then go to YTEC on Thursday afternoons (5-week session), expecting to leave Chapman at 2:00pm and return by 6:00pm. Overall, we will spend a total amount of 10-weeks (either in RJH the first five weeks or YTEC the second five weeks) teaching conflict resolution skills to in-custody youth. 
The second track of this clinic is the Victim/Offender mediation program that we will conduct throughout the semester. Students must attend at least two Restorative Justice mediations throughout the semester, which could take place on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday evening at 5:30pm in Riverside County. You will be able to coordinate your schedule with the VIC/OFF mediations to make this work for your schedule. (We are working to incorporate a technology based platform so that you can participate in the mediations through technology rather than in-person.)
NOTE: There is a stipend that goes along with this clinic in order to offset any expenses for your commute to/from Riverside County. Additionally, you may also have the opportunity to work with Chapman SR undergrad students to mentor them in this program as they explore the law through this clinic.
What do we do: The Criminal Justice Dispute Resolution Clinic is a clinic based on the tenets of Restorative Justice. What is Restorative Justice? This is an approach to criminal justice that aims, through reconciliation with the victim, to repair the harm caused by the offender’s criminal behavior. Providing students with a unique opportunity to implement Restorative Justice and Restorative Practice, this clinic offers two approaches. First, clinic students will teach dispute resolution to in-custody juveniles, as well as teach them peer mediation skills, giving them tools to react differently to the conflicts with which they are confronted. Second, clinic students participate in Restorative Justice mediations that emphasize Restorative Practice. This aspect of the clinic collaborates with the Probation Department and District Attorney’s Office and allows for clinic students to mediate cases between victims and youth-offenders, implementing Restorative Practice that repairs the relationship through accountability, remorse, and restorative action that may lead to forgiveness. If the parties reach a resolution, students draft settlement agreements, which, if satisfied by the offender, helps the offender avoid probation and avoid potential time in juvenile hall while learning the importance of relational foundations. Clinic students will gain valuable experience in the criminal justice system, unique client-counseling-opportunities, and hands-on mediation experience. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Tax Clinic

Tax Procedure and Administration Clinic (1) Law-7612
The clinical component of the Tax Procedure and Administration course allows students to handle actual tax controversy cases for low income taxpayers on a pro bono basis before the IRS and in U.S. Tax Court under special rules of student practice.  Students learn the practical application of tax procedures and handle all aspects of their cases, including trial if necessary.  Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and concurrent enrollment in Tax Procedure and Administration. This course will satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement.

Co-Curricular Courses (variable credits)

Diversity and Social Justice Forum Staff (1) Law-7936
Diversity and Social Justice Board (1) Law-7937
The Diversity and Social Justice Journal is a student-run scholarly publication at Chapman University Dale E. Fowler School of Law, dedicated to providing a forum that can give expression and representation to a wide spectrum of progressive and diverse voices at Chapman. 
Subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty advisor, academic credit is awarded as follows:
1. staff members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester for a total of two units; and,
2. board members may each receive one unit of academic credit per semester of participation for a total of two units.

Externship (Law 7588, 7589, 7590, 7653)
Externships offer law school credit for practical experience working for a judge; District Attorney or Public Defender; government agency, non-profit, private law firm or corporation. Externs work under the supervision of experienced practicing attorneys or judges who provide guidance and training in research, writing, and practical Experiential Course. For information on how to obtain an externship, visit http://www.chapman.edu/law/externships/index.aspx.

Externships can be taken for between 1 and 5 units during the school year and for between 1 and 6 units over the summer, except for select judicial externships that are considered “full time” which can be taken for 10 units. For details on how many hours must be worked per unit, as well as how many externships can be taken in all, see the Externship Handbook, available in room 350 or at the above link.  

The Director of the Externship Program must approve all externships; students are not permitted to enroll online. To apply for admission to the Externship Program, submit a completed Externship Application to the Director as soon as possible, or at least 1 week before the start of the summer session.  Applications are found at the end of the Externship Handbook.  If the Director approves the externship, students will be enrolled in the course within 1 week.  In addition to fieldwork, students must participate in a one-time “boot camp” (see times listed below). 

Law Review Law-7860
The Chapman Law Review is a legal journal edited and published by School of Law students selected on the basis of academic achievement and a writing competition. Students on the Chapman Law Review receive credit for demonstrable competence in scholarly writing and editing. Students are required to produce a student note as a Directed Research project under the direction of a faculty member during their first year on the Law Review. Students may receive up to three units of credit for Directed Research during the spring semester. Students are also registered for one unit of credit in the spring semester of the first year of service on Law Review which is graded by the Law Review's faculty adviser.  Thereafter, subject to approval prior to registration by the faculty adviser, senior editors may receive up to three ungraded units of academic credit per semester of participation. 

Skills Competitions Law-7861
Experiential Course competitions are an important component of legal education.  Such competitions offer realistic opportunities to practice research, writing, analytical, and communications skills and to develop ethics, judgment, and professionalism.  Students may earn one unit of credit for Negotiations, Mediation, and Client Counseling competitions if they reach the regional level of competition, or three units for trial and appellate competitions outside the law school.  This course may satisfy the Experiential Course Requirement with a two credit minimum. Only Moot Court Competitions may satisfy the Practice Oriented Writing Requirement, and only if Professor Nancy Schultz, or another member of the Faculty, agrees to supervise the revision of the brief.