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Katharine Gillespie Head Shot

Michael Valdez Moses, Ph.D.

September 20, 2017 • 11:00 AM
Argyros Forum 209B

"Saved the Blessings of Civilization": John Ford's Stagecoach and American Vernacular Modernism

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Summary: While John Ford’s status as one of the founders of modern cinema has long been secure, his contribution to a “modernist” cinema remains very much in doubt.  While film historians have noted the influence of Murnau’s expressionist films, especially Sunrise (1927), on the cinema of Ford  (both directors were working for Fox Studios in the mid-1920s), and many of the most distinguished directors of the European and international “new wave” (including François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Wim Wenders, Akira Kurosawa, and Satyajit Ray) acknowledged Ford’s influence on their art, a widespread critical perception remains that Ford’s most famous and popular movies, and most especially his Westerns, embody a socially conservative and relatively traditional Hollywood aesthetic.  This characterization of his work fails to recognize that Ford was a key contributor to an innovative form of vernacular American modernism that emerged in the late 1920s and 1930s, and that offered an alternative to the cosmopolitan and European varieties of high modernism associated with expatriate American artists such as Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, and Gertrude Stein. Though the “grammar,” “lexicon,” and “idiom” of American vernacular modernism varied according to the particular medium or art in which it was developed, an overlapping set of subjects, motifs, and representational techniques cut across arts as diverse as American cinematography, painting, music, architecture, and dance. Moreover, Ford’s vernacular modernism of the late 1930s was self-consciously populist, critical, and allied with the politically progressive elements of the New Deal.

Focusing on Stagecoach (1939)...continue to explore the full summary.

Bio: Michael Valdez Moses is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Member of the Faculty in the Program of Literature at Duke University. Professor Moses grew up in Los Angeles and was educated at Harvard, New College, Oxford, and the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Novel and the Globalization of Culture (Oxford UP, 1995), and editor/co-editor of A Modernist Cinema (forthcoming, Oxford UP), Modernism, Postcolonialism, Globalism: Anglophone Literature 1958 to Present (Oxford UP, 2018), Modernism and Cinema, (Edinburgh UP, 2010), Modernism and Colonialism: British and Irish Literature, 1900-1939 (Duke UP, 2007), and The Writings of J. M. Coetzee (Duke UP, 1994. He is a founding co-editor of the journal, Modernist Cultures (published by Edinburg University Press). His main interests are in 20th-century comparative literature (especially British and Irish modernism), global postcolonial literature, the history of film, and the interdisciplinary study of literature, political philosophy, and economics. 



Katharine Gillespie Head Shot

Katharine Gillespie, Ph.D.

September 21, 2017 • 4:00 PM
Wilkinson Hall 116

"Shades of Representation: Lucy Hutchinson’s Ghost and the Politics of the Representative"

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Abstract: Mary Nyqvist’s and Margaret Ferguson’s groundbreaking essay collection, Re-Membering Milton (1987) called for critics to situate “Milton’s presentation of gender relations historically, including, now, in relation to the various women writers of the period who have recently been discovered” (xv). In “Shades of Representation: Lucy Hutchinson’s Ghost and the Politics of the Representative,” Katharine Gillespie heeds that call. She explores conceptions of liberty by placing Milton’s gendered analysis of idolatry in the household and the state in dialogue with Lucy Hutchinson’s more egalitarian exploration of personal and political idolatry in her writings honoring her husband, the republican war hero and regicide, John Hutchinson. Continuing her revision of earlier accounts of the supposedly adversarial relationship between feminism and liberalism, Gillespie’s exploration of emerging ideals of liberty deepens our understanding of the multiple uses and effects of this key Miltonic term.

Bio: Katharine Gillespie is Professor of Seventeenth-Century English and Colonial American Literature at Miami University. She specializes in writings by seventeenth-century women who were associated with religious and political dissent. She is the author of Domesticity and Dissent in the Seventeenth-Century: English Women Writers and the Public Sphere (Cambridge University Press, 2004) and Women Writing the English Republic, 1625-1681 (Cambridge University Press, 2917). She is the editor of Writings by Katherine Chidley (Ashgate, 2009) ) and of The Prophetess and the Patriarch: The Visions of an Anti-Regicide in Seventeenth Century England (Writings by Elizabeth Poole) (forthcoming, The Other Voices Series, Iter Press, 2017). She is currently at work on a new monograph, Eve’s  Economy: Capitalism and Female Agency in the English Restoration.

 


George Tsai Head Shot

George Tsai, Ph.D.

October 16, 2017 • 10:30 AM
Argyros Forum 209A

"Respect and the Efficacy of Blame"

Abstract: What is the role of respect in enabling blame to be effective in changing the blamed's attitude and behavior? I argue that the interest in having another person's respect plays an important role in enabling blame to be effective. More specifically, I develop an account of blame’s operations in three different cases (standard, intermediate, and proleptic blame), and raise a normative worry: when blame achieves its desired effect in cases where the blamer and blamed are far apart in their moral understanding and motivations, blame begins to approximate manipulation and coercion, leaving a moral residue.

Bio: George Tsai is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawaii. His research interests are in moral and political philosophy. More specifically, his work focuses on the moral complexity of relationships and transactions in our personal and political lives. He has published articles in leading venues including Philosophy and Public Affairs, Journal of Political Philosophy, Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, Social Theory and Practice, and Oxford Studies in Agency and Responsibility.



Eric Schliesser head shotEric Schliesser, Ph.D.

October 23, 2017 • 8:00 AM-12:30 PM
Sandhu Conference Center Suite E

Adam Smith: Systematic Philosopher and Public Thinker

 

Summary: This workshop brings together leading experts to explore the significance of Eric Schliesser's Adam Smith (OUP, 2017). The book is the product of two decades' reflection by the author on Adam Smith and the Scottish Enlightenment. The book treats Adam Smith as an exemplary public intellectual whose ideas successfully helped shape the foundations for a liberal society. A key presupposition of the book's argument is that liberal ideas can and need to be renewed in light of both our present challenges and, simultaneously, by reflection on the paths to the present.

Unique among treatments of Adam Smith, Schliesser's book treats him as a systematic philosopher. He places Smith's ideas in the context of a host of other philosophers, especially Hume, Rousseau, and Newton; and he draws on the reception of Smith's ideas by Sophie de Grouchy, Mary Wollstonecraft, and other philosophers and economists to sketch the elements of, and the detailed connections within, Smith's system.

Schliesser offers new interpretations of Smith's views on the invisible hand, the Wealth of Nations, his treatment of virtue, the nature of freedom, the individual's relationship to society, his account of the passions, the moral roles of religion, and his treatment of the role of mathematics in economics.

For this workshop, Dr. Schliesser will be joined by Smith Institute Faculty and...

Brianne Wolf, Ph.D.

Brianne Wolf, Ph.D.

Brianne Wolf is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Director of the political economy program at Ashland University, where she teaches courses on political economy and history of political thought. She completed her undergraduate work at Michigan State University, has an M.A. from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison for her dissertation work on the relationship between freedom and aesthetic judgment in the modern age. She has published on both Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Adam Smith. During summer 2018, Brianne will be a Smith Scholar in residence at Liberty Fund in Indianapolis.

M. Ali Kahn, Ph.D.

M. Ali Kahn, Ph.D.

M. Ali Khan (Abram Hutzler Professor of Political Economy) obtained his B.Sc. (Econ) from the London School of Economics, and M.Phil. and Ph.D. from Yale in 1969, 1972 and 1973 respectively. He is interested in how economics stands in relation to mathematics and language as well as to issues of ethics and epistemology, and how these registers call the robustness of disciplinary boundaries of social sciences into question. This has led him to the "economics of the 18th century", and more generally to the language of commerce in a variety of texts that includes the Quran.



Eric Schliesser, Ph.D.

October 27, 2017 • 3:00 PM
Wilkinson Hall 116

"Rawls and the Economists on The Displacement of Knightian Uncertainty in Mathematical Economics."

Abstract: The main aim of this paper is to understand how and why (true) Knightian uncertainty was displaced during the so-called formal revolution in mathematical economics. I discuss a number of arguments that led to the sidelining of true uncertainty (associated with the ideas of Knight and Keynes) and I explore two displacement strategies associated with ideas of Arrow and Alchian. However, I frame my discussion by way of a debate between Arrow and Rawls. For, it turns out that Rawls accepted Knightian uncertainty. I propose a conceptual framework that can bring these foundational debates in mathematical economics, political economy, and political philosophy together.

Bio: Eric Schliesser (PhD in Philosophy, The University of Chicago) is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Amsterdam. He has published widely in the history and philosophy of early modern science from Newton and Spinoza to Adam Smith, the history of forgotten feminists (especially Sophie de Grouchy), and recent philosophy of economics, especially on the rise and fall of Chicago Economics. In addition to his monograph, Adam Smith: Systematic Philosopher and Public Thinker, he has edited volumes on Sympathy: History of a Concept, Ten Neglected Classics, Newton and EmpiricismThe Oxford Handbook of Isaac Newton, and a forthcoming critical edition and translation of Sophie De Grouchy's Letters on Sympathy (all with Oxford University Press). Schliesser is a prolific blogger (at Digressionsnimpressions) and loves California.

 


Jim MarroneJim Marrone, Ph.D.

November 17, 2017 • 3:00 PM
Wilkinson Hall 116

"Linguistic and Cultural Assimilation as a Human Capital Process"

Abstract: I develop a learning-by-doing theory of cultural assimilation, in which an individual's cultural identity is determined by past investments in culture-specific social capital. The model incorporates several empirically relevant aspects of assimilation that have been difficult to explain in past models. The mechanism in my model yields two possible qualitative outcomes of the assimilation process, depending on the intertemporal complementarities of investment. The first, in which individuals become more homogeneous over time, has been used to explain immigrants' wage assimilation. The second, in which individuals become more heterogeneous as some assimilate and some do not, has vastly different implications for immigration and integration policies. Using detailed datasets from three immigrant destination countries, I provide a variety of evidence from linguistic, identity, and religiosity measures that cultural assimilation (in contrast to economic assimilation) most closely resembles the second type of process.

Bio: Jim Marrone is an economist at RAND Corporation in Washington, DC. He received his PhD in economics from the University of Chicago in 2017. His two research agendas focus on modeling and measuring cultural assimilation, and on measuring the size and scope of the black market for antiquities. In addition, Jim has designed and taught undergraduate courses in time series econometrics (for economics majors) and game theory (for humanities majors). In his free time he does improv and has developed/led a seminar using improv skills to help academics and researchers better communicate their work to non-specialists.