» Health Psychology Research Group

The Health Psychology Research Group (HPRG) embraces an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the biological and social factors shaping health and well-being.  As part of the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences at Chapman University, we examine emotions, experiences, and social context connect with psychological and physical well-being.  The health psychology research group consists of nationally recognized scholars investigating topics such as maternal and fetal health, body image and disordered eating, post-partum depression, positive psychology and health, pain management, and human sexuality.  The research group conducts research that advances basic science and that has implications for public policy.  The group also works to make findings from basic scientific research available to the general public with the broader goal of enhancing general understanding of health and science. 

The research group consists of:

+ - Dr. Laura Glynn (maternal stress and child outcomes)

Laura GlynnDr. Glynn came to Chapman University after earning her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from UC-San Diego and serving as a post-doctoral researcher at UC-Irvine.  Her work at the Early Human and Lifespan Development Program examines the interplay between biological, psychosocial, and behavioral processes in human pregnancy and the influences of these processes on fetal/child development.  Her research examines the underlying causes of premature birth, which is the most serious problem in maternal-child health and the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality in the United States.  She examines how pre- and postnatal hormone exposure influences the female brain and behavior, and more specifically the quality of maternal behavior and post-partum depression.  Furthermore, she investigates the role of very early life influences in fetal, infant, and child development.  
She has been awarded over $20,000,000 in grants from the National Institutes of Health as a primary or co-investigator. Her work has been published in the top journals in the field, including The Lancet, Health Psychology, Psychological Science, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychoneuroimmunology.

Links to her academic publications can be found here.

The Huffington Post
Post-Partum Depression Risk
Fox News
Pregnancy May Change Mom’s Brain for Good
Newsweek
The Pregnant Brain: How Mothers Think Differently
Smithsonian
What Makes a 21st Century Mom?
Examiner
Does Unborn Fetus Know When Pregnant Mom is Depressed?
Psych Central
How Pregnancy’s Hormonal Flood Affects A Woman’s Brain
Yahoo News
Pregnancy Hormone May Predict Postpartum-Depression Risk
The Inquisitr
Is Pregnancy Brain Fog for Real?
Daily Mail
Baby Brain Syndrome Is Real, and it Makes You A Better Mother
HNGN
Postpartum Depression Detection Through Blood Test
Science Daily
How Pregnancy Changes A Woman’s Brain
Can Fetus Sense Mother’s Psychological State?
Still Mulling Over Last Nights Argument?  It Could Affect Your Heart
Poor Sleep Quality Linked To Preterm Births
Hormone Level During Pregnancy May Identify Women At Risk for Postpartum

Articles
Glynn LM, Davis EP, Sandman CA & Goldberg WA (in press). Gestational hormone profiles predict human maternal behavior at 1-year postpartum. Hormones and Behavior.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0018506X16303208

Edelmann MN*, Sandman CA, Glynn LM, Wing DA & Davis EP (2016). Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment is associated with diurnal cortisol regulation in term-born children. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 72, 106-112.
http://www.psyneuen-journal.com/article/S0306-4530%2816%2930185-8/pdf


Hahn-Holbrook J, Fox M & Glynn LM (2016). Demonstration of elevated cerebralspinal fluid CRH levels during pregnancy provides support for (not against) the link between CRH and postpartum depression. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 101, L5-6.
http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jc.2015-3798

Howland MA*, Sandman CA, Glynn LM, Crippen C & Davis EP (2016). Fetal exposure to placental corticotropin-releasing hormone is associated with child self-reported internalizing symptoms. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 67, 10-17.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306453016300221

Fox M*, Sandman CA, Davis EP & Glynn LM (2015). Intra-individual consistency in endocrine profiles across successive pregnancies. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 100, 4637-4647.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26485218/Intra-Individual_Consistency_in_Endocrine_Profiles_Across_Successive_Pregnancies


+ - Dr. David Frederick (body image, antifat stigma, and human sexuality)

David Frederick

Education: UCLA, Ph.D. in 2011

Email: dfrederi@chapman.edu

Link to Chapman Website

Link to CV

Link to Google Scholar Profile Page

Link to Personal/Lab Website

Dr. Frederick came to Chapman University after earning his Ph.D. in social psychology with minors in health psychology and quantitative psychology, and serving as a visiting assistant professor at University of Hawaii at Manoa.  His survey research on body image uses national samples to examine the prevalence and predictors of body dissatisfaction and body modification among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual men and women.  He cofounded the International Body Project with Viren Swami, which examined body image among men and women in 41 sites across 26 countries.  His experimental work on body image examines how media coverage of medical research on obesity shapes antifat prejudice, diet and exercise intentions, and support for obesity-related public policies.   His research on human sexuality uses large national datasets to investigate the prevalence and predictors of sexual satisfaction, orgasm frequency, infidelity, and sexual desire.  
His research has been funded by National Institutes of Health (National Research and Service Award), and his survey and experimental projects have been financed by a range of private and non-profit organizations (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, NBCNews.com, msnbc.com, Elle, Self, ivillage.com, Today.com).  His work has been published in the top journals in the field, including Social Science and Medicine, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, International Journal of Obesity, Body Image, Archives of Sexual Behavior, Psychology of Men and Masculinity.  He is an editorial board member at Body Image and Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences.

Links to his academic publications can be found here.  His research and commentary has routinely been featured in television media outlets such as Good Morning America, CNN, Fox News, and Today Show. 

Wall Street Journal        
After Ashley Madison, How to Cope with Infidelity
Are You Likely to Have an Affair?

Huffington Post               
Ashley Madison Hack Creates Ethical Conundrum for Researchers
Men Still Paying for Dates
Study Suggests Men and Women View Cheating Differently
Dating: Women Care More Than Men About Who’s Taller

Salon
Good News For Dad Bods and Curvy Girls

The Atlantic                        
Why are Men Still Paying for First Dates?

NPRs Marketplace          
In an Age of Equality, Who Should Pay for Dates?

CNN                                         
It’s 2015: Who Pays on the First Date?

Time                                         
Jealousy: One Way Men and Women are Different

NY Times Live                     
Gender is a Great Predictor of What People Want in a Partner

Toronto Star                        
How Many Friends Do People Really Count On?

Chicago Daily Herald     
How Many of Your Facebook Friends Will Show Up to Your Birthday Party?

NBC News                             
Most of Us Think We’re Hotter Than Average, Survey Says

Yahoo News                        
What Men and Women Look For in a Mate

UK Daily Mail
Short Men Have Fewer Sexual Partners than Their Taller Peers

MSN                                          
Study Reveals New Insights on Men, Women, and the Dating Game

Today.com                            
Toxic Friends? 8 in 10 People Endure Poisonous Pals
Reality Check for Reality TV Fans
Many Cheat for a Thrill, More Stay True for Love

Men’s Health                      
What Do Women Consider To Be A Sexy Body?

Men’s Journal                    
Does Penis Size Matter?

Health Day                           
Does Size Matter? Most Romantic Partners Say No
Straight Men More Prone to Jealousy Over Sexual Infidelity
Scrawny Beats Brawny for Women Seeking A Life Mate

Science Daily                  
New Research On Attractiveness and Mating
Adults Rely on Friendship for Expressive, Instrumental, Companionate Support
Who Pays for Dates?
Research on Jealousy: Impact of Sexual vs. Emotional Infidelity
Huge Numbers Want Cosmetic Surgery
Potential Evolutionary Role of Sexual Regret in Human Reproduction

+ - Dr. Julia Boehm (positive psychology and health)

Julia Boehm

Education: UC-Riverside, Ph.D in 2009

Email: jboehm@chapman.edu

Link to Chapman Website

Link to CV

Link to GoogleScholar Profile Page

Link to Personal/Lab Website

Dr. Boehm came to Chapman University after earning her Ph.D. in social and personality psychology from UC Riverside and serving as a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard School of Public Health.  Her research centers broadly on well-being and investigates how people can thrive both mentally and physically.  More specifically, her research examines whether positive psychological characteristics such as optimism and life satisfaction are associated with improved cardiovascular health, as well as relevant behavioral and biological processes.  Her goal is to identify those psychological characteristics that contribute to healthy trajectories of cardiovascular functioning across the lifespan.
Her research examining psychological well-being and cardiovascular health has been funded by the National Institute on Aging.  Her work has been published in top psychology and health-related journals, including Psychological Bulletin, Psychological Science, Health Psychology, American Journal of Cardiology, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Psychosomatic Medicine, European Heart Journal, Emotion, and Perspectives on Psychological Science.

The Atlantic                    
What We Know Now About How To Be Happy

BBC News                              
Being An Optimist ‘May Protect Against Heart Problems’

NBC News                            
Happy? Positive Outlook May Be Good for Your Heart

Reuters Health                  
Midlife Optimism Linked to Healthier Cholesterol

Intnl. Business Times     
Eat Your Way to Happiness With Fruit and Veg

OC Register                          
Living Textbook: Healthy Attitudes

Academic Minute           
Health and Happiness

Health Matters                  
Effect of Happiness on Heart Health (Video)

Science Daily                      
New Study Sheds Light on Life Satisfaction and Mortality Risk
Optimistic People Have Healthier Hearts
Positive Feelings May Help Protect Cardiovascular Health
Satisfaction With Life Protective Against Heart Disease

+ - Dr. Jennifer Hahn-Holbrook (Breast feeding, post-partum depression and evolutionary medicine)

Jennifer Hahn-HolbrookEducation: Queen’s University, Belfast, Ph.D in 2010

Email: hahnholb@chapman.edu

Link to Chapman Website

Link to CV

Link to GoogleScholar Profile Page

Link to Personal/Lab Website

The Health Psychology Research Group (HPRG) embraces an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the biological and social factors shaping health and well-being.  As part of the Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences at Chapman University, we examine how emotions, experiences, and social context connect with psychological and physical well-being.  The HPRG consists of nationally recognized scholars investigating topics such as maternal and fetal health, body image and disordered eating, human resilience, post-partum depression, psychological well-being, pain management, and human sexuality.  The HPRG conducts research that advances basic science and that has implications for public policy.  The group also works to make findings from basic scientific research available to the general public with the broader goal of enhancing general understanding of health and science.

NBC News                        
Breast Feeding Makes New Mothers Mama Bears

Boston Globe                      
Uncommon Knowledge: Surprising Insights from Social Science

UNICEF                                    
Breast Feeding Reduces Maternal Stress, Aids Protective Response

Association Psych Sci    
Nursing Mothers Defend Babies With A Vengeance

OC Register                          
Post-Partum Depression and Diabetes Link

Huffington Post                 
Is Postpartum Depression a Disease of Modern Civilization?

Today.com                            
In Real Life, Depressed Lady Mary Would Have Been Tied to Bed

Examiner                               
Post-Partum Depression, Stress Hormones, and Family Support

Medical Daily                     
Hormones Linked to Postpartum Depression

Science Daily                     
Stress Hormone Foreshadows Postpartum Depression in New Mothers
Like Mama Bears, Nursing Mothers Defend Babies

+ - Dr. David Pincus (pain management, behavioral medicine, system’s modeling and resilience)

David PincusEducation: Marquette University, Ph.D in 2002

Email: pincus@chapman.edu

Link to Chapman Website

Link to CV

Link to GoogleScholar Profile Page

Dr. Pincus came to Chapman University after earning his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Marquette University and completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the UC-Davis department of Psychiatry.  His extensive clinical training comprised over 13,000 clinical hours working patients from across the diagnostic and age spectrum, from infants to geriatrics.  Dr. Pincus’s research focusses on measuring the complex dynamical structures that underlie biopsychosocial processes, including physiological coordination, social interaction patterns, behavioral flows, and personality structure.  Using models and methods from an area of science known as nonlinear dynamical systems theory, he has focused on understanding the role that structural integrity and flexibility play in biospcyshosocial resilience.  Dr. Pincus has focused on applications of this scientific program to areas including pain management, behavioral medicine, and an integrative approach to psychotherapy (Experiential Balancing Therapy).  
Dr. Pincus is the author of the book Imagery for Pain Relief: A Scientifically Grounded Guidebook for Clinicians and co-editor of the book Chaos and Complexity in Psychology:  The Theory of Nonlinear Dynamical Systems. He is the Co-Editor of the Imagery and Human Development Series (Baywood Publishing) and a review editor for Frontiers in Psychology, Psychology for Clinical Settings.  His work has been published in the top journals in the field of integrative systems science, including Interface Focus; Non-Linear Dynamics Psychology and Life Sciences, and Small Group Research.  Dr. Pincus is also a former president of the Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology and Life Sciences.

His faculty web-site can be found here and his Google Scholar profile can be found here.

  • Featured
  • News
  • Events

The health psychology research group is part of a broader community of scholars at Chapman University focusing on health research, including researchers in: 

Health Sciences

Marriage and Family Therapy

Athletic Training

Physician Assistant Studies

Physical Therapy

Communication Studies

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Environmental Science, Health, and Policy

Sociology

  • Featured
  • News
  • Events