» Dr. Lilia D. Monzo
Associate Professor

College of Educational Studies
Dr. Lilia D. Monzo
Office Location:
Reeves Hall 203
Email:
Affiliations:
Freshman Foundations Program
Education
University of California, San Diego, Bachelor of Arts
University of Southern California, Master of Science
University of Southern California, Ph.D.
Biography

Outside Appointments  Principle Investigator and Adjunct Vice-President in USA Centro de Estudios en Epistemología Pedagógica (CESPE)

Dr. Lilia D. Monzó is Assistant Professor of Education in the College of Educational Studies at Chapman University. She received the Ph.D. in Education from the University of Southern California in 2003 and followed that with a three-year Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her recent scholarship and research draw on revolutionary critical pedagogy to interrogate and confront the educational and sociopolitical contexts impacting Latino communities in the United States and América Latina. In her view, local realities and cultural formations, such as racism and patriarchy, must always be examined in relation to the totality of global capitalism. Dr. Monzó also draws on other theoretical frameworks to guide her work including Latina/Chicana feminist theory, decoloniality, and sociocultural theory. She uses critical ethnography and life history methods as a context within which to collaboratively improve existing social and material conditions for participants while simultaneously working to effect clarity, hope and vision for a societal transformation.

Dr. Monzó teaches courses in the Teacher Education Program that address critical and responsive approaches to working with students and families from diverse racial, ethnic, linguistic, and otherwise marginalized communities, including methods for teaching English learners and bilingual education. She also teaches qualitative research methodologies, including ethnography and life history methods in the Ph.D. program. She encourages students to challenge the ideologies that sustain existing capitalist social relations and to strategically adopt anti-racist, feminist, and critical pedagogy to create the spaces within which we can unite in solidarity and create a new social imaginary.

Lilia has provided easy access to a few of her favorite pieces from her collection. View links below:

Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2014, Dec.). Red love: Toward racial, economic and social

justice. Truthout, Dec. 18. Retrieved http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/28072-red-love-toward-racial-economic-and-social-justice

Monzó, L.D. (2015). Confronting colonial representations of Latinas: Developing a

liberation praxis. Postcolonial Directions in Education, 4(1), 1-25.

Morales, P.Z. & Monzó, L.D. (2014). Ethics and power in education research:

Looking for equity across research contexts. The Qualitative Report 19(79), 1-14. Retrieved http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR19/morales79.pdf

Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2014). Critical pedagogy and the decolonial option:

Challenges to the inevitability of capitalism. Policy Futures in Education, 12(4), 513-525.

Monzó, L.D. (2014). Ethnography in charting paths toward personal and social

liberation: Using my Latina cultural intuition. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 28(4), 373-393. 

Monzó, L.D. (2013). A mother’s humiliation: Schools and institutionalized

violence against Latina mothers. School Community Journal, 23(1), 81-110.

Recent Creative, Scholarly Work and Publications
McLaren, P. & Monzó, L.D. (2016). Reclaiming Che! A pedagogy of love and revolution toward a socialist alternative. In I. Ness & S. Maty Bâ (Eds.), Palgrave Encyclopedia of Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
Monzó, L.D. & Morales, P.Z. (2016). Critical pedagogy and participatory democracy: Creating classroom contexts that challenge “common sense.” Democracy and Education, 24(1).
Monzó, L.D. (2016). “They don’t know anything!”: Latino immigrant children appropriating the oppressor’s voice and the complicit role of schooling. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 47(2).
Monzó, L.D., McLaren, P., & Rodriguez, A. (2016). Deploying guns to expendable communities: Bloodshed in Mexico, US imperialism and transnational capital – A call for revolutionary critical pedagogy. Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2016). Challenging the violence and invisibility against women of Color – A Marxist imperative. Iberoamérica Social: revista-red de estudios sociales.
Monzó, L.D. (2015). Humanizing the tenure process. Toward a pedagogy of the heart. In A. Kemp (ed.), The dignity of the calling: Educators share the beginnings of their journeys. Information Age Publishing.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2015) The future is Marx: Bringing back class and changing the world – A moral imperative. In M.Y. Eryaman & B. Bruce (Eds.), International Handbook of Progressive Education (pp. 643-670). PEGEM.
Monzó, L.D. (2015). Afterword - Comrade Peter: Marx meets Ginsberg. In P. McLaren, Pedagogy of Insurrection. Peter Lang.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2015) Marked for labor: Latina bodies and transnational capital – A Marxist feminist pedagogy that pushes back! In C.R. Monroe, (Ed.), Race and colorism in education. New York: Routledge.
Monzó, L.D. (2015). Confronting colonial representations of Latinas: Developing a liberation praxis. Postcolonial Directions in Education, 4(1), 1-25.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2015). Pedagogy of possibility: Socialism on the way to “deep democracy.” Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 46(4).
Hill, D., Wilson, F., & Monzó, L. (2015). Neoliberalism and the new common sense in education: A Marxist critique. The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education, 1(1).
Monzó, L.D. (2015). Pushing back on neoliberalism and paving the road for class struggle: Lesson from América Latina. LAPIZ, 2, 129-156.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2015). Women and violence in the age of migration. Iberoamérica Social: revista-red de estudios sociales, June 10. Retrieved http://iberoamericasocial.com/women-and-violence-in-the-age-of-migration/
McLaren, P. Monzó, L.D., & Rodriguez, A. (2014). Distribución de armas a comunidades prescindibles. Baño de sangre en México, imperialismo estadounidense y capital transnacional: por una pedagogía crítica revolucionaria. In Tiempos violentos Barbarie y decadencia civilizatoria. Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ediciones Herramientas.
Monzó, L.D. & SooHoo, S. (2014). Translating the academy: Learning the racialized languages of academia. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education. 70 (3), 147-165.
Morales, P.Z. & Monzó, L.D. (2014). Ethics and power in education research: Looking for equity across research contexts. The Qualitative Report 19(79), 1-14. Retrieved http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR19/morales79.pdf
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2014). Critical pedagogy and the decolonial option: Challenges to the inevitability of capitalism. Policy Futures in Education, 12(4), 513-525.
Monzó, L.D. (2014). Ethnography in charting paths toward personal and social liberation: Using my Latina cultural intuition. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 28(4), 373-393.
Monzó, L.D. (2014). A critical pedagogy for democracy: Confronting higher education’s neoliberal agenda with a critical Latina feminist episteme. Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies. 12(1), 73-100.
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2014). Toward a red theory of love, sexuality, and the family. Iberoamérica Social: revista-red de estudios sociales (III), 48-51. Retrieved http://iberoamericasocial.com/toward-a-red-theory-of-love- sexuality-and-the-family
Monzó, L.D. & McLaren, P. (2014, Dec.). Red love: Toward racial, economic and social justice. Truthout, Dec. 18. Retrieved http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/28072-red-love-toward-racial-economic-and-social-justice
Monzó, L.D. (2013). Learning to follow: An ethnographer’s tales of engagement. In M. Berryman, S. Soohoo, & A. Nevin (Eds.), Culturally Responsive Methodology (pp. 371-388). Emerald Publishing.
Monzó, L.D. (2013). A mother’s humiliation: Schools and institutionalized violence against Latina mothers. School Community Journal, 23 (1), 81-110
Monzó, L.D. & Merz, A. (2012). Introduction. In L. Monzó & A. Merz (Eds.), The Hope for Audacity: Public Identity and Equity Action in Education (pp 1-14). New York: Peter Lang Publishers.
Monzó, L.D. & Soohoo, S. (2012). A wink or a nod: A call for the President’s consideration of race. In L. Monzó & A. Merz (Eds.), The Hope for Audacity: Public Identity and Equity Action in Education (pp. 31-62). New York: Peter Lang Publishers.(Reprinted from Scholarlypartnershipsedu, 5(1), 2011).
Monzó, L.D. & Merz, A. (Eds.). (2012). The hope for audacity: Public Identity and Equity Action in Education. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
Monzó, L.D. & Soohoo, S. (2011). A wink or a nod: A call for the President’s consideration of race. Scholarlypartnershipsedu, 5(1). [equal author contribution]
Rueda, R. & Monzó, L.D. (2010). Successful in the Academy. In Publish and Flourish: A Guide for Writing in Education (2nd Edition).
Monzó, L.D. (2009). Fostering Academic Identitites: Contextualizing Parents’ Roles. In M.L. Dantas & P. Manyak (Eds.), Home-School Connections in a Multicultural Society: Learning from and with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families.
Monzó, L.D. & Rueda, R. (2009). Passing for English fluent: Latino immigrant children masking language proficiency. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 40(1), 20-40.