Schmid College of Science and Technology

Andrew Lyon, Ph.D., Dean

Michael Fahy, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Operations, Facilities and Finance

Christopher Kim, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Academic Programs

Elaine Benaksas Schwartz, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of External Relations

Professors: Aharanov, Alpay, Caporaso, de Bruyn, El–Askary, Fahy, Griffin, Jipsen, Kafatos, Kim, Lyon, Moshier, Ortiz–Franco, Piper, Prakash, Radenski, Singh, Tollaksen, Verkhivker, Yang;

Associate Professors: Allali, Bisoffi, Fudge, Funk, Keller, Rakovski, Rowland–Goldsmith, Schwartz, Vajiac, A., Vajiac, M., Wellman, Were, Wright, Zhao;

Assistant Professors: Ahsan, Bonne, Bostean, Buniy, Donyina, Dressel, Dunham, Gartner, Hellberg, LaRue, Leifer, Linstead, MacPherson, Medvedeff, Nayeri, Owens, Sherff, Toto;
Instructors: Chang, German, Goetz, Hsu.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Bachelor of Science in Data Analytics
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Policy
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

Joint Degree Program in Mathematics and Civil Engineering (Chapman University and University of California, Irvine)
Bachelor of Science in Physics

Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering

The Schmid College of Science and Technology prepares students for the complex world of the twenty–first century by challenging students to think critically, to engage in research and to become involved in outreach through clubs and volunteer work. The college offers traditional and interdisciplinary degrees and programs designed for students who aspire to become tomorrow’s scientists, health care providers and leaders in fields related to science and technology. The Schmid College of Science and Technology invites you to join our dynamic community of scholars–teachers and students.

GPA and grade option requirements

Students pursuing any degree in the college must maintain a 2.000 grade point average in the major. All courses in the major must be taken for a letter grade except for those that may only be taken or that have a default grading option of P/NP.

Degree Program Honors 

Students must have a major GPA of 3.500 or higher and must have completed a minimum of 120 hours of independent research. Completion of independent research includes the completion of a scientific paper in the relevant scientific field, oral presentation to the faculty, poster presentation at the Chapman University Student Research Day and a vote by the appropriate faculty group that the research, paper and presentations were of sufficient quality to merit honors. Additional degree program honor requirements, if they exist, are listed under the degree program description.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Students must complete at least 21 upper–division credits in the major at Chapman University to earn a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology. Transferability of credits from other institutions will be determined at the discretion of the program director. Students with sufficient high school background or appropriate AP or IB test scores may waive one course or more of the following: BIOL 204, CHEM 140/140L, MATH 110, PHYS 107. (Note, however, that these courses may need to be taken at a college/university to fulfill the requirements for medical school and/or other graduate programs.)

requirements (42 credits)

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

BIOL 204

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I), Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 208

Introduction to Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

MATH 303

Biostatistics

3

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

BCHM 335

Biochemistry I–BioMolecules, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 336

Biochemistry II: BioMetabolism

3

BCHM 420

Physical Biochemistry, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 436

Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

electives (9–12 credits)

three of the following

BIOL 302

Introduction to Bioinformatics

3

CHEM 310

Analytical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 320

Bioengineering and Biotechnology

3

BIOL 330

General Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 337

Immunology

3

CHEM 340

Physical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 350

Medicinal Chemistry

3

CHEM 411

Analytical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 417

Microbiology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 432

Advanced Organic Chemistry

3

BIOL 437

BioMedical Informatics

3

BCHM 444

Computational Biochemistry

3

BIOL 450

Cell Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

science requirements (14 credits)

PHYS 107*

General Physics for the Life Sciences I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

PHYS 108*

General Physics for the Life Sciences II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

total credits

 

65–68

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

*PHYS 101/101L and PHYS 102/102L may be substituted for PHYS 107 and PHYS 108.

exit exam requirement

All majors will take a standardized exit exam on the Saturday after fall break or spring break in the senior year.

capstone requirement

Students are required to complete a capstone project before graduation. Students cannot graduate until the capstone project has been successfully completed and the faculty advisor has notified the Office of the University Registrar that the capstone requirement has been fulfilled. This requirement shall be fulfilled by completing one of the listed options. Students seeking honors must complete option one, two or four.

Option one: Successful completion of undergraduate research experience in between junior and senior year funded by the National Science Foundation, American Chemical Society, Chapman SURF or other national research agency that sponsors undergraduate research. The research experience must be at least eight weeks long, require full–time work in a laboratory setting and lead to the completion of a well–defined research project. A student selecting this option will submit a formal research paper modeled after a formal lab report to the academic advisor by end of semester of the senior year and present this research in poster format at the University student research day. Students will also give an oral presentation of their research to the biochemistry and molecular biology faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Option two: Successful completion of a pre–approved research internship immediately preceding or during senior year that results in the completion of a research project. The student must register for three credits of BCHM 490 and work with a faculty member and research supervisor to identify the student's research project. A student selecting this option will submit a formal research paper modeled after a formal lab report to the faculty internship supervisor by end of semester of the senior year and present this research in poster format at the University student research day. Students will also give an oral presentation of their research to the biochemistry and molecular biology faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Option three: Successful completion of a significant review of the literature. The student must register for two credits of BCHM 491 or 499 in the fall semester senior year to begin work on this project and one credit in the spring semester of their senior year. The student shall expect to invest considerable time and effort researching and writing this review, which will be 30 to 40 pages in length and appropriately cited. The review is due to the faculty mentor at the end of the semester of the senior year. Students will give an oral presentation of their paper to the biochemistry and molecular biology faculty at the end of fall and spring semester in their senior year.

Option four: Successful completion of independent research overseen by a faculty member in the sciences (this will satisfy chemistry in–depth course requirements). The student will register for BCHM 491 or 499 for a minimum of three credits over two consecutive semesters in their senior year and complete a faculty–mentored student research project. The student will write a formal research paper modeled after the formal lab report and will present this research in poster format at the University student research day. The report is due on end of semester of the senior year. When appropriate, a faculty member may substitute a team research project for an individual research project. When a team project is substituted, all members of the team must write a research paper modeled after the formal lab report. The team will present this project in poster format at the University student research day. Students will give an oral presentation of their research to the biochemistry and molecular biology faculty at the end of fall and spring semester in their senior year.

Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences

Students graduating with a B.S. in Biological Sciences, will earn program honors at graduation by meeting the program honors criteria, in addition students must complete BIOL 494 Senior Research: Data Analysis and Presentation with a grade of "C" or better. Students must complete 67 credits total to graduate.

biology core (8 credits)

BIOL 204*

From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I), Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 205

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II), Lecture and Laboratory

4

science core (32 credits)

PHYS 107

General Physics for the Life Sciences I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

PHYS 108

General Physics for the Life Sciences II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

MATH 303

Biostatistics

3

area of study requirements (24 credits)

Complete all the requirements within one of the areas of study listed below. 16 credits must be lecture/lab combinations. 21 credits must be upper–division (300 or above).

24

capstone course (3 credits)

BIOL 498

Capstone Course for Biological Sciences Majors (grade of C or better required)

3

total credits

 

67

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Biological Sciences.

molecular biology area of study (24 credits)

three of the following (11–12 credits)

BIOL 208

Introduction to Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 302

Introduction to Bioinformatics

3

BIOL 330

General Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 417

Microbiology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 436

Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 450

Cell Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 335

Biochemistry I–Biomolecules, Lecture and Laboratory

4

FSN 530/530L

Food Microbiology/Food Microbiology Lab

3,1

one course from each of the other areas of study (6–8 credits)

 

course from anatomy and physiology area of study

3–4

 

course from ecology and evolution area of study

3–4

select one or two additional courses from any area of study (4–8 credits)

 

course may include BIOL 291, 490, 491 or 494

4–8

anatomy and physiology area of study (24 credits)

three of the following (9–11 credits)

BIOL 210

Human Anatomy, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 337

Immunology

3

BIOL 355

Physiology of Drugs

3

BIOL 365

Human Physiology Part A

3

BIOL 366

Human Physiology Part B, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 407

Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3

BIOL 410

Developmental Biology

3

one course from each of the other areas of study (6–8 credits)

 

course from molecular biology area of study

3–4

 

course from ecology and evolution area of study

3–4

select one or two additional courses from any area of study (4–8 credits)

 

course may include BIOL 291, 490, 491 or 494

4–8

ecology and evolution area of study (24 credits)

three of the following (12 credits)

BIOL 301

Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 319

Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 324

Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 333

Animal Behavior, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 338

Ornithology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 440

Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

one course from each of the other areas of study (6–8 credits)

 

course from molecular biology area of study

3–4

 

course from anatomy and physiology area of study

3–4

select one or two additional courses from any area of study (4–8 credits)

 

course may include BIOL 291, 490, 491 or 494

4–8

*these courses may be waived with the appropriate test scores, as noted below:

PHYS 107 – Minimum score of five on IB Physics HL waives students from this class.

MATH 110 – Minimum score of four on AP Calculus AB or five on MATH HL exam waives students from this class. Minimum score of four on AP Calculus BC students from MATH 110 and 111.

MATH 111 – Minimum score of four on AP Calculus BC exam waives students from this class. Minimum score of four on AP Calculus BC waives students from MATH 110 and 111.

CHEM 140/140L – Minimum score of four on AP Chemistry or five on IB Chemistry HL exam waives students from this class.

BIOL 204 – Minimum score of four on AP Biology or IB Biology HL exam waives students from this class.

CPSC 230 – Minimum score of four on AP Computer Science waives students from this class.

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

introductory courses (8 credits)

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

cognate courses (17 credits)

PHYS 101/101L

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

PHYS 102/102L

General Physics II/Lab–General Physics II

3,1

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

chemistry foundation courses (20 credits)

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 301

Inorganic Chemistry

4

CHEM 310

Analytical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 335

Biochemistry I: BioMolecules, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 340

Physical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

chemistry indepth courses (13–15 credits)

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 411

Analytical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 441

Physical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 490

Independent Internship

1–3

CHEM 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

CHEM 499

Individual Study

1–3

electives (9 credits)

Students must take a minimum of nine graded credits, six credits must be CHEM courses. Electives beyond nine graded credits may be taken P/NP. Note that professional programs may require graded courses.

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

CHEM 325

Atmospheric Chemistry

3

CHEM 326

Aquatic Chemistry

3

CHEM 327

Environmental Geochemistry

3

BCHM 336

Biochemistry II: BioMetabolism

3

BCHM 350

Medicinal Chemistry

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

CHEM 432

Advanced Organic Chemistry

3

BCHM 444

Computational Biochemistry

3

PHYS 451

Quantum Mechanics

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

FSN 501/502

Food Chemistry/Food Chemistry Lab

3,1

total credits

 

67–69

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Chemistry.

exit exam requirement

All majors will take a standardized exit exam on the Saturday after fall break or spring break in their senior year.

capstone requirement

Students are required to complete a capstone project before graduation. Students cannot graduate until the capstone project has been successfully completed and the faculty advisor has notified the Office of the University Registrar that the capstone requirement has been fulfilled. This requirement shall be fulfilled by completing one of the listed options. Students seeking honors must complete option one, two or four.

Option one: Successful completion of undergraduate research experience in between junior and senior year funded by the National Science Foundation, American Chemical Society, Chapman SURF or other national research agency that sponsors undergraduate research. The research experience must be at least eight weeks long, require full–time work in a laboratory setting and lead to the completion of a well–defined research project. A student selecting this option will submit a formal research paper modeled after a formal lab report to the academic advisor by end of semester of the senior year and present this research in poster format at the University student research day. Students will also give an oral presentation of their research to the chemistry faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Option two: Successful completion of a pre–approved research internship immediately preceding or during senior year that results in the completion of a research project. The student must register for three credits of CHEM 490 and work with a faculty member and research supervisor to identify the student's research project. A student selecting this option will submit a formal research paper modeled after a formal lab report to the faculty internship supervisor by end of semester of the senior year and present this research in poster format at the University student research day. Students will also give an oral presentation of their research to the chemistry faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Option three: Successful completion of a significant review of the literature. The student must register for two credits of CHEM 491 or 499 in the fall semester senior year to begin work on this project and one credit in the spring semester of the senior year. The student shall expect to invest considerable time and effort researching and writing this review, which will be 30 to 40 pages in length and appropriately cited. The review is due to the faculty mentor at the end of the semester of the senior year. The review will be graded. Students will give an oral presentation of their paper to the chemistry faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Option four: Successful completion of independent research overseen by a faculty member in the sciences (this will satisfy chemistry in–depth course requirements). The student will register for CHEM 491 or 499 for a minimum of three credits over two consecutive semesters in their senior year and complete a faculty–mentored student research project. The student will write a formal research paper modeled after the formal lab report and will present this research in poster format at the undergraduate research day. The report is due on end of semester of the senior year. When appropriate, a faculty member may substitute a team research project for an individual research project. When a team project is substituted, all members of the team must write a research paper modeled after the formal lab report. The team will present this project in poster format at the University student research day. Students will give an oral presentation of their research to the chemistry faculty at the end of fall and spring semesters in their senior year.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems

2016–17 is the final year to declare the major Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems. This degree is being replaced by the Bachelor of Science in Data Analytics.

lowerdivision requirements (27 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

ECON 200

Principles of Microeconomics

3

ECON 201

Principles of Macroeconomics

3

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

ACTG 210

Introduction to Financial Accounting

3

ACTG 211

Introduction to Managerial Accounting

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

upperdivision requirements (27 credits)

MGMT 316

Management of Organizations

3

PHIL 316

Business and Professional Ethics

3

FIN 317

Financial Management

3

SE 310

Software Design

3

SE 320

The Software Development Lifecycle

3

MGSC 346

Production and Operations Management

3

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

CPSC 353

Data Communications and Computer Networks

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

electives (9 credits)

 

Three upper–division courses in computer science or software engineering

9

total credits

 

63

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Computer Information Systems.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

lowerdivision core requirements (27 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

CPSC 250

Computer Systems and Assembly Language Programming

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

general science requirement (8 credits)

A two–semester sequence of laboratory natural science courses. One of these courses may be used to satisfy the natural science inquiry General Education requirement.

8

upper–division requirements (25 credits)

CPSC 330/330L

Digital Logic Design I/Lab–Digital Logic Design I

3,1

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

CPSC 351

Computer Architecture I

3

CPSC 353

Data Communications and Computer Networks

3

CPSC 354

Programming Languages

3

CPSC 380

Operating Systems

3

CPSC 402

Compiler Construction

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

electives (12 credits)

Students, in consultation with and approval of the computer science advising committee, will design individual elective programs to suit their academic goals. Electives may be satisfied by any of the following courses, at least three of which must be upper–division courses:

MATH 251

Discrete Mathematics II

3

CPSC 285

Social and Ethical Issues in Computing

3

SE 300

Software Requirements and Testing

3

SE 310

Software Design

3

SE 320

The Software Development Lifecycle

3

CPSC 352

Computer Architecture II

3

CPSC 355

Human Computer Interaction

3

CPSC 356

Android Application Development

3

CPSC 357

iOS Application Development

3

CPSC 360

Computer Graphics

3

CPSC 366

Digital Logic Design II

3

CPSC 370

Topics in Computer Science

3

CPSC 390

Artificial Intelligence

3

CPSC 392

Introduction to Data Science

3

CPSC 406

Algorithm Analysis

3

CPSC 430

Computational Economics

3

CPSC 445

High Performance Computing

3

CPSC 453

Network Implementation and Security

3

CPSC 465

Integrated Circuit Design I

3

CPSC 466

Integrated Circuit Design II

3

CPSC 490

Independent Internship

1–6

CPSC 498

Senior Project

3

CPSC 499

Individual Study

3

 

Upper–division mathematics course

 

total credits

 

72

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Plans for B.S. in Computer Science.

For students interested in embedded systems (ES) and those interested in graduate studies in ES, the department strongly recommends the following courses: MATH 251, CPSC 366, 465, 466, 498.

Bachelor of Science in Data Analytics

lowerdivision requirements (27 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

ECON 200

Principles of Microeconomics

3

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

MGSC 207

Introduction to Business Analytics

3

ACTG 210

Introduction to Financial Accounting

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

CPSC 285

Social and Ethical Issues in Computing

3

upperdivision requirements (27 credits)

MGSC 310

Statistical Models in Business Analytics

3

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

CPSC 353

Data Communication and Computer Networks

3

CPSC 355

Human Computer Interaction

3

CPSC 370

Topics in Computer Science (Data Visualization)

3

CPSC 392

Introduction to Data Science

3

CPSC 393

Machine Learning

3

CPSC 408

Database Systems

3

MGSC 410

Applied Business Analytics

3

electives (9 credits)

three of the following

MATH 303

Biostatistics

3

ENV 310/310L

Geographic Information Systems/Geographic Information Systems Lab

3, 1

CPSC 356

Android Application Development

3

CPSC 357

iOS Application Development

3

CPSC 360

Computer Graphics

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

CPSC 390

Artificial Intelligence

3

MGSC 406

Advanced Experimental Design and Statistics

3

CPSC 430

Computational Economics

3

CPSC 435

BioMedical Informatics

3

CPSC 445

High Performance Computing

 

ECON 452

Econometrics

3

CPSC 458

Web Engineering

3

MGSC 496

Special Topics in Management Science (Applied Analytics and Decision Making)

3

total credits

 

63

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Data Analytics.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Policy

All students must complete required coursework in six competency areas for a total of 48–49 credits (32–33 lower–division and 16 upper–division credits). The competency areas include quantitative foundations, science foundations, environmental science and policy, data acquisition and analysis, systems approach to decision making and communication. Students then select to concentrate in one of three areas of study: ecology, earth systems or environmental policy. Students must complete 9–12 credits in their selected area of study and 3–4 credits in each of the other areas of study (for a total of 15–20 credits).

Students must complete at least 21 upper–division credits in the major at Chapman University to earn a degree in environmental science and policy. Transferability of credits from other institutions will be determined at the discretion of the program director.

quantitative competency (6 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

science competency (16 credits)

PHYS 107

General Physics for the Life Sciences I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

BIOL 205

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II), Lecture and Laboratory

4

environmental science and policy competency (16–17 credits)

requirements

ENV 101

Introduction to Environmental Science

3

ENV 102

Introduction to Environmental Policy

3

ENV 205

Seminar Series

1

ENV 374

Environmental Politics and Policy

3

ENV 375

Public Policy Process

3

one of the following

ENV 111/111L

Physical Geology/Physical Geology Laboratory

3,1

ENV 112

Introduction to Hazards and Global and Environmental Change

3

data acquisition, analysis and display (4 credits)

ENV 310/310L

Geographic Information Systems/Geographic Information Systems Lab

3,1

systems approach to environmental decision making (3 credits)

ENV 330

Environmental Problem Solving: Energy and Matter Flow    

3

effective communication and service learning (3 credits)

ENV 498

Environmental Problem Solving: Senior Capstone and Seminar

3

area of study requirements (15–20 credits)

Complete all the requirements within one of the following areas of study

15–20

total credits

 

63–69

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Environmental Science and Policy.

ecology area of study (15–20 credits)

three of the following (9–12 credits)

BIOL 301

Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 319

Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 324

Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 333

Animal Behavior, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 440

Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

ENV 490

Independent Internship

1–3

ENV 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

select two additional courses (6–8 credits)*

one course from each of the other areas of study

 

course from other area of study

3–4

 

course from other area of study

3–4

earth systems area of study (15–20 credits)

three of the following (9–12 credits)

ENV 301

Environmental Geology

3

ENV 320

Earth System Science

3

CHEM 325

Atmospheric Chemistry

3

CHEM 326

Aquatic Chemistry

3

CHEM 327

Environmental Geochemistry

3

ENV 420

Environmental Hydrology

3

ENV 440

Remote Sensing of the Environment

3

ENV 490

Independent Internship

1–3

ENV 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

select two additional courses (6–8 credits)*

one course from each of the other areas of study

 

course from other area of study

3–4

 

course from other area of study

3–4

environmental policy area of study (15–20 credits)

three of the following (9–12 credits)

HIST 301

U. S. Environmental History

3

PHIL 303

Environmental Ethics

3

POSC 320

International Law, International Organization, and World Order

3

PHIL 321

Philosophy of Science

3

POSC 335

Political Economy

3

SOC 335

Society and the Environment

3

POSC 346

Environmental Law

3

ENG 374

Environmental Rhetoric

3

POSC 378

Special Topics in Public Policy

3

ECON 465

Environmental and Natural Resources Economics

3

ENV 490

Independent Internship

1–3

ENV 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

select two additional courses (6–8 credits)*

one course from each of the other areas of study

 

course from other area of study

3–4

 

course from other area of study

3–4

*No double counting of courses. The selection of ENV 490 or 491 will be applied to the appropriate track based on the faculty advisor's home department or the description of the internship.

Students with sufficient high school background or appropriate AP, IB test scores may waive BIOL 205, CHEM 140/140L, ENV 101, MATH 110 and/or PHYS 107.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

requirements (39 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 380

Introduction to Abstract Algebra

3

MATH 450

Real Analysis

3

MATH 460

Modern Algebra

3

one of the following

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

general science requirement (8 credits)

A two–semester sequence of laboratory natural science courses. One of these courses may be used to satisfy the natural science inquiry General Education requirement.

8

electives (12 credits)

Students, in consultation with and approval from the mathematics advising committee, will design individual elective programs to suit their academic goals. Mathematics electives may be satisfied by any of the following courses, at least two of which must be upper–division courses:

MATH 208

Foundations of Geometry

3

MATH 220

Scientific Computing I

3

MATH 251

Discrete Mathematics II

3

MATH 260

Number Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

MATH 370

Special Topics in Mathematics

3

MATH 390

Introduction to Differential Geometry

3

MATH 440

Topology

3

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

MATH 481

Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

3

MATH 490

Independent Internship

1–6

MATH 499

Individual Study

½–6

 

Any upper–division computer science course.

 

total credits

 

59

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Mathematics.

For students interested in pure mathematics, especially those interested in pursuing a graduate degree, the program strongly recommends the following courses: MATH 260, 440 and 451.

For students interested in careers or further study in applied mathematics or computational science, the program strongly recommends the following courses: MATH 251, 361, 451 and 454.

For students preparing to become mathematics teachers, the program strongly recommends the following courses: MATH 208, 260 and 280.

Chapman University/University of California, Irvine Joint Degree Program in Mathematics and Civil Engineering

The Chapman University/University of California, Irvine (UCI) joint degree program in Mathematics and Civil Engineering combines the strengths of a top tier comprehensive university, nationally recognized for its commitment to excellence through research and innovative teaching, with those of a major research institution in a carefully designed dual bachelor's degree program.

Students will complete their first three years of study in the personalized academic environment at Chapman and their last two years at UCI's Henry Samueli School of Engineering with the facilities and distinguished faculty of that renowned engineering program. While at Chapman students will major in mathematics. The mathematics majors will complete UCI's civil engineering program.

Students will receive two degrees: B.S. in Mathematics and B.S. in Civil Engineering.

Chapman students need to complete the first three years of the appropriate program of study with an overall GPA of 3.200 or higher to participate in the joint degree program for admission to UCI. See the core curriculum requirements for mathematics/civil engineering. At the completion of the five–year program, graduates will receive two bachelor's degrees, one from each university.

Chapman students must apply for admission to UCI in November prior to the fall quarter they will be full–time students at UCI. Before enrolling in their first course at UCI, students need to meet with a UCI advisor.

Some courses need to be completed during summer session at Chapman, UCI or through UCI's University Extension (UNEX) program (see course requirements). Chapman students must meet University of California residence requirements to be classified as a resident for fee tuition purposes.

Students should adhere to the program of core and general education courses as outlined in the course requirements. The general education program needs to be equivalent to an IGETC program. In addition, students will be required to complete UCI's upper–division writing requirement after matriculation to UCI.

major requirements

(To be completed in addition to appropriate basic subjects, general education and common requirements. See appropriate section of the undergraduate catalog for specifics.)

mathematics at Chapman

ENV 101

Introduction to Environmental Science

3

PHYS 101/101L

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

PHYS 102/102L

General Physics II/Lab–General Physics II

3,1

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory (recommended)

3,1

ECON 200

Principles of Microeconomics

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

MATH 220

Scientific Computing I

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

MATH 380

Introduction to Abstract Algebra

3

MATH 450

Real Analysis

3

MATH 460

Modern Algebra

3

one of the following

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

electives (6 credits)

Electives may be satisfied by any of the following courses, at least one of which must be an upper–division course.

MATH 208

Foundations of Geometry

3

MATH 251

Discrete Mathematics II

3

MATH 260

Number Theory

3

MATH 370

Special Topics in Mathematics

3

MATH 390

Introduction to Differential Geometry

3

MATH 440

Topology

3

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

MATH 481

Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

3

three courses taken during summer session at UCI (11 credits)

ENGR CEE 30

Statics

4

ENGR CEE 80

Dynamics

4

ENGR CEE 81A

CAD

3

See University of California, Irvine catalog for the fourth and fifth year classes in engineering.

Bachelor of Science in Physics

core requirements (32 credits)

PHYS 101/101L

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

PHYS 102/102L

General Physics II/Lab–General Physics II

3,1

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

PHYS 220

Scientific Computation I

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

physics requirements (30 credits)

PHYS 201

General Physics III

3

PHYS 250

Mathematical Methods in Physics

3

PHYS 320

Mechanics I

3

PHYS 321

Mechanics II

3

PHYS 421

Electricity and Magnetism I

3

PHYS 422

Electricity and Magnetism II

3

PHYS 430

Thermodynamics I

3

PHYS 431

Thermodynamics II

3

PHYS 451

Quantum Mechanics

3

PHYS 452

Quantum Mechanics II

3

electives (minimum 6 credits required)

PHYS 326

Cosmology

3

CPSC 320/PHYS 340

Quantum Information Science

3

CHEM 340

Physical Chemistry I, Lecture and laboratory

4

PHYS 370

Special Topics in Physics

3

MATH 390

Introduction to Differential Geometry

3

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

PHYS 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

PHYS 499

Individual Study

1–3

total credits

 

68

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Physics.

Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering

lowerdivision requirements (27 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 203

Introduction to Statistics

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

CPSC 285

Social and Ethical Issues in Computing

3

upperdivision requirements (33 credits)

SE 300

Software Requirements and Testing

3

SE 310

Software Design

3

SE 320

The Software Development Lifecycle

3

SE 330

Software Qualification and Delivery

3

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

CPSC 354

Programming Languages

3

CPSC 355

Human Computer Interaction

3

ENG 370

Technical Writing

3

CPSC 380

Operating Systems

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

SE 498

Software Engineering Capstone Project

3

seminar requirement (1 credit)

SE 480

Software Engineering Seminar

1

electives (9 credits)

Students, in consultation with and approval from the software engineering advising committee, will design individual elective programs to suit their academic goals. Software engineering electives may be satisfied by any of the following courses.

CPSC 330/330L

Digital Logic Design I/Lab–Digital Logic Design I

3,1

CPSC 351

Computer Architecture I

3

CPSC 356

Android Application Development

3

CPSC 357

iOS Application Development

3

CPSC 390

Artificial Intelligence

3

CPSC 392

Introduction to Data Science

3

CPSC 402

Compiler Construction

3

CPSC 406

Algorithm Analysis

3

SE 410

Software Process and Management

3

SE 420

Formal Methods in Software Engineering

3

total credits

 

70

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans for B.S. in Software Engineering.

The program strongly recommends the following general education course for natural science inquiry: PHYS 101 and for social Inquiry: ECON 200.

Schmid College of Science and Technology Integrated Degree Programs

4 + 1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Computational and Data Sciences

Students completing undergraduate science degrees are eligible to complete an additional year of study to obtain a M.S. in Computational and Data Sciences degree. Computational science is an interdisciplinary field in which computers and mathematics are used to model and simulate biological and physical processes found in the natural world. This graduate degree consists of four areas of study: bioinformatics and computational biology, analytics and applied mathematics, computational economics and earth system science. For specific criteria, refer to the Schmid College of Science and Technology website.

4 + 1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Economic Systems Design

Students completing undergraduate science degrees are eligible to complete an additional year of study to complete the M.S. in Economic Systems Design. Students study the design, development, testing and implementation of economic institutions and how they operate. The master’s degree prepares students to undertake the scientific process of understanding and developing systems of exchange and incentive. For specific eligibility criteria for this program, refer to the Economic Science Institute website.

4 + 1 Integrated Undergraduate/Master of Science in Food Science

Students completing undergraduate degrees in biochemistry and molecular biology, biological sciences, chemistry and health sciences are eligible to complete an additional year of study to obtain the M.S. in Food Science degree. Food science is a multidisciplinary program that applies scientific concepts to the understanding of the properties of food. Food scientists apply scientific principles to the processing, packaging, preservation, storage, evaluation and utilization of food. For specific eligibility criteria for this program, refer to the Schmid College of Science and Technology website.

For programs listed above, graduate courses used to satisfy undergraduate degree requirements, may also satisfy up to 12 credits of graduate coursework and may be double–counted towards both bachelor's and master's degrees.

Minors in Schmid College of Science and Technology

Minor in Analytics

The Minor in Analytics provides students with an introduction to data intensive decision making using modern statistical techniques and technological tools that are common across a broad set of disciplines including business, technology, mathematics and the sciences.

Requirements

lower–division requirements (9 credits)

MGSC 207

Introduction to Business Analytics

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

one of the following

MATH 203*

Introduction to Statistics

3

PSY 203

Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

3

MGSC 209

Introductory Business Statistics

3

upper–division requirements (9 credits)

MGSC 310**

Statistical Models in Business Analytics

3

CPSC 392

Introduction to Data Science

3

MGSC 410

Applied Business Analytics

3

upper–division electives (6 credits)

BIOL 302

Introduction to Bioinformatics

3

MATH 303

Biostatistics

3

CPSC 308

Enterprise Data Management

3

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

MGSC 406

Advanced Experimental Design and Statistics

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

CPSC 435/BIOL 437

BioMedical Informatics

3

ECON 452

Econometrics

3

total credits

 

24

*Mathematics majors may cover this requirement with MATH 361. Biological Science majors may cover this requirement with MATH 303.

**Economics majors may cover this requirement with ECON 452.

Minor in Chemistry

A Minor in Chemistry requires a minimum of 23 graded credits selected from the following list, 12 of which may not be duplicated by the major or any other minor. In addition, a minimum of 12 credits must be at the upper–division level (a course number 300 or higher) and at least seven of the upper–division credits must be completed at Chapman University. Many upper–division electives have prerequisites and students are encouraged to consider these requirements when selecting courses for this minor.

Upon completion of the minor core chemistry courses, at least two elective courses of three or more credits must be taken. Students may satisfy the elective requirement by taking two courses from electives group A or by taking one course from each of electives groups A and B. Courses from the electives lists that are required for the student's major do not count towards the chemistry minor.

core chemistry courses (16 credits)

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 150/150L

General Chemistry II/General Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 230/230L

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

CHEM 331/331L

Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

3,1

electives group A (4 or more credits)

at least one of the following

CHEM 301

Inorganic Chemistry

4

CHEM 310

Analytical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 340

Physical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

4

electives group B (3–4 credits)

at most one of the following

CHEM 325

Atmospheric Chemistry

3

CHEM 326

Aquatic Chemistry

3

CHEM 327

Environmental Geochemistry

3

BCHM 335

Biochemistry I: BioMolecules, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BCHM 336

Biochemistry II: BioMetabolism

3

BCHM 350

Medicinal Chemistry

3

CHEM 411

Analytical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 432

Advanced Organic Chemistry

3

CHEM 441

Physical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

4

total credits

 

23–24

Minor in Computational Science

A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

lowerdivision requirements (18 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

upperdivision electives (9 credits)

BIOL 302

Introduction to Bioinformatics

3

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

total credits

 

27

Minor in Computer Science

A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

lowerdivision requirements (15 credits)

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 231

Computer Science II

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

CPSC 250

Computer Systems and Assembly Language Programming

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

electives (9 credits)

three of the following

SE 310

Software Design

3

SE 320

The Software Development Lifecycle

3

CPSC 330/330L

Digital Logic Design I/ Lab–Digital Logic Design I

3,1

CPSC 350

Data Structures and Algorithms

3

CPSC 351

Computer Architecture I

3

CPSC 353

Data Communications and Computer Networks

3

CPSC 354

Programming Languages

3

CPSC 355

Human Computer Interaction

3

CPSC 360

Computer Graphics

3

CPSC 370

Topics in Computer Science

3

CPSC 380

Operating Systems

3

CPSC 390

Artificial Intelligence

3

CPSC 402

Compiler Construction

3

CPSC 406

Algorithm Analysis

3

CPSC 408

Database Management

3

CPSC 430

Computational Economics

3

CPSC 445

High Performance Computing

3

CPSC 453

Network Implementation and Security

3

total credits

 

24

Minor in Environmental Science

A Minor in Environmental Science requires a minimum of 22 credits selected from the following list, 12 of which may not be duplicated by the major or any other minor. In addition, a minimum of 12 credits must be at the upper–division level. Many upper–division electives have prerequisites and students are encouraged to consider these requirements when selecting courses for this minor.

requirements (6 credits)

ENV 101

Introduction to Environmental Science

3

one of the following

ENV 102

Introduction to Environmental Policy

3

ENV 112

Introduction to Hazards and Global and Environmental Change

3

science lab electives (4 credits)

one of the following

ENV 111/111L

Physical Geology/Physical Geology Laboratory

3,1

BIOL 205

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II), Lecture and Laboratory

4

ENV 227

Darwin and the Galapagos (travel course)

4

upperdivision electives (minimum of 12 credits)

BIOL 301

Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

ENV 301

Environmental Geology

3

ENV 310/310L

Geographic Information Systems/Geographic Information Systems Lab

3,1

BIOL 319

Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

ENV 320

Earth System Science

3

BIOL 324

Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

CHEM 325

Atmospheric Chemistry

3

CHEM 326

Aquatic Chemistry

3

CHEM 327

Environmental Geochemistry

3

ENV 330

Environmental Problem Solving: Energy and Matter Flow

3

BIOL 333

Animal Behavior, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 440

Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

ENV 440

Remote Sensing of the Environment

3

ENV 490

Independent Internship

1–3

ENV 491

Student–Faculty Research/Creative Activity

1–3

total credits

 

22

Minor in Game Development Programming

A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

lowerdivision requirements (12 credits)

CPSC 230

Computer Science I

3

CPSC 236

Visual Programming

3

CPSC 242

Introduction to the Game Industry

3

CPSC 244

Level Design I

3

upperdivision requirements (6 credits)

CPSC 340

Game Development

3

CPSC 440

Collaborative Game Development

3

electives (6–7 credits)

two of the following, at least one of which must be upper–division.

PHYS 101/101L

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

DA 202

3D Computer Graphics I

3

DA 206

Mechanics of Motion

3

DA 242

2D Computer Graphics

3

DA 249

Storytelling in Digital Arts

3

CPSC 285

Social and Ethical Issues in Computing

3

DA 302

3D Computer Graphics II

3

DA 339

Digital Illustration

3

CPSC 344

Level Design II

3

MGSC 346

Production and Operations Management

3

CPSC 353

Data Communication and Computer Networks

3

CPSC 360

Computer Graphics

3

CPSC 390

Artificial Intelligence

3

total credits

 

24–25

Minor in Mathematics

A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

requirements (18 credits)

MATH 110

Single Variable Calculus I

3

MATH 111

Single Variable Calculus II

3

MATH 210

Multivariable Calculus

3

MATH 211

Linear Algebra

3

MATH 250

Discrete Mathematics I

3

MATH 350

Differential Equations

3

electives (9 credits)

three of the following, at least two of which must be upper–division.

MATH 208

Foundations of Geometry

3

MATH 251

Discrete Mathematics II

3

MATH 260

Number Theory

3

MATH 270

Computational Mathematics Tools

3

MATH 360

Probability Theory

3

MATH 361

Mathematical Statistics

3

MATH 370

Special Topics in Mathematics

3

MATH 380

Introduction to Abstract Algebra

3

MATH 390

Introduction to Differential Geometry

3

MATH 440

Topology

3

MATH 450

Real Analysis

3

MATH 451

Complex Analysis

3

MATH 454

Numerical Analysis

3

MATH 460

Modern Algebra

3

MATH 481

Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

3

total credits

 

27

Minor in Nutrition

The Minor in Nutrition requires at least 21 credits of which at least twelve must be upper–division.

prerequisites (6–8 credits)

one of the following (3–4 credits)

CHEM 103

Chemistry for Health

3

CHEM 140/140L

General Chemistry I/General Chemistry I Laboratory

3,1

one of the following (3–4 credits)

HSK 112

Human Physiology in Health and Disease

3

BIOL 211

Principles of Physiology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 366

Human Physiology Part B, Lecture and Laboratory

4

HSK 366

Human Physiology Part B, Lecture and Laboratory

4

requirements (12 credits)

FSN 120

Introduction to Food Science

3

FSN 200

Nutrition for Life

3

FSN 201

International Nutrition: The World Food Crisis

3

FSN 303

Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

3

electives (9 credits)

FSN 322

Community Nutrition

3

FSN 338

Nutrition and Human Performance

3

FSN 339

Lifecycle Nutrition

3

CHEM 350

Medicinal Chemistry

3

FSN 431

Special Topics in Nutrition

3

FSN 443

Medical Nutrition Therapy

3

FSN 490

Independent Internship

1–3

FSN 499

Individual Study

1–3

total credits

(excluding prerequisites)

21

Minor in Organismal Biology

A Minor in Organismal Biology is a concentrated study of organisms and the relationship they form with each other and their environment. Students learn theoretical information and lab techniques to study organisms and these relationships. A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

requirements (8 credits)

BIOL 205

Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II), Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 324

Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

elective courses (12 credits)

select any combination of courses

BIOL 301

Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 319

Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 333

Animal Behavior, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 338

Ornithology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

BIOL 440

Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

4

total credits

 

20

Minor in Physics

A minimum of nine credits must be upper–division.

requirements (17 credits)

PHYS 101/101L*

General Physics I/Lab–General Physics I

3,1

PHYS 102/102L*

General Physics II/Lab–General Physics II

3,1

PHYS 201

General Physics III

3

PHYS 202

Modern Physics

3

PHYS 250

Mathematical Methods in Physics

3

three of the following (9–10 credits)

PHYS 320

Mechanics I

3

PHYS 321

Mechanics II

3

PHYS 326

Astronomy and Cosmology

3

PHYS 330/330L

Digital Logic Design I/Lab–Digital Logic Design I

3,1

PHYS 370

Special Topics in Physics

3

PHYS 421

Electricity and Magnetism I

3

PHYS 422

Electricity and Magnetism II

3

PHYS 430

Thermodynamics I

3

PHYS 431

Thermodynamics II

3

PHYS 451

Quantum Mechanics

3

PHYS 452

Quantum Mechanics II

3

total credits

 

26–27

*By petition PHYS 107 and PHYS 108 may be substituted for PHYS 101/101L and PHYS 102/102L.

Course Descriptions – Biochemistry

BCHM 208 Introduction to Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as BIOL 208.)

BCHM 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

BCHM 320 Bioengineering and Biotechnology

Prerequisites, BCHM 208, 208L. Biotechnology describes the modification of biological organisms according to the needs of humanity, including the genetic engineering technology so prevalent today. Bioengineering is the science upon which all biotechnological applications are based. It is concerned with applying an engineering approach (systematic, quantitative, and integrative) and an engineering focus (the solutions of problems) to biological problems. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BCHM 329 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

BCHM 335 Biochemistry I-Biomolecules, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, CHEM 331. Biochemistry is study of the chemical and molecular interactions that occur in and constitute living organisms. In Biomolecules, students will examine the structure and function of the fundamental building blocks of life (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids). This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

BCHM 336 Biochemistry II: BioMetabolism

Prerequisite, CHEM 331. Biochemical study of the metabolic processes involved in the maintenance of life. Special attention is given to understanding the energetics of life and the regulation and control of biochemical reactions constituting metabolic pathways. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

BCHM 350 Medicinal Chemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 150, 331, or consent of instructor. A study of the physiological, toxological, and pharmacological effects of drugs on the human body. The interaction between potent chemicals, including plant and food ingredients, and living systems studied to understand biologic processes and provide strategies for treatment, prevention, and diagnosis of diseases. Lecture. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BCHM 401 Cancer Biology

(Same as BIOL 401.)

BCHM 420 Physical Biochemistry, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, BCHM 208, 335, PHYS 108, Physical Biochemistry explores the structure of biological systems at the molecular level. The structure and function of biomembranes, protein structure and enzyme activity will be understood through the study of model supramolecular structures and biophysical techniques. The lab emphasizes quantitative techniques including data acquisition/statistics, use of computer data bases, molecular visualization, molecular modeling and computational chemistry methods. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

BCHM 436 Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as BIOL 436.)

BCHM 438 Virology

Prerequisites, BCHM 335, and BIOL 208, or BCHM 208. Biochemical and Molecular Virology examines virus to host cell interactions and virus genetics in relation to infection, cell entry, replication and disease. This knowledge is further used to understand the application of viruses in biotechnology, biochemical research and medical therapeutics. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BCHM 444 Computational Biochemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 150, PHYS 101, MATH 111, BCHM 335. This course provides essential theoretical methods and computational techniques for biomolecular research, including molecular level simulation of biological processes, biological structure modeling, and computer-aided drug design. The intended audiences are both students who need a background for studying more advanced computational techniques and students who are doing experiments, but also have interests in computations. Students, by the end of the course, should be able to critically assess the applicability of computational methods to specific questions from a biochemistry point of view, and successfully apply appropriate computational techniques in their academic and scientific careers. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BCHM 490 Independent Internship

P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

BCHM 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

BCHM 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Supervised independent research/study in biochemistry and molecular biology. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Biology

BIOL 102 Forensics

For non-science majors. Fulfills GE Natural Science Inquiry. This course integrates biology, chemistry, and physics as applied to forensics. Students will learn basic principles of science that are used in forensics investigations. They will also see how the scientific method enhances their ability to evaluate arguments surrounding forensics issues. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

BIOL 132 Human Genetics

For non-majors only. Principles of genetics applied to the human population. Lecture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BIOL 145 Introduction to Applications in Computational Science

(Same as PHYS 145.) Computational science is an emerging field of the sciences, computer science, and mathematics. This course is to provide the fundamentals of computational science, and introduce a variety of scientific applications. We will examine how scientific investigations involve computing in basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, global change, medicine and particularly biosciences. The student will be offered examples of computer simulations and data analysis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BIOL 199 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

BIOL 204 From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth (Gen Biol I), Lecture and Laboratory

Principles of biology as a chronology of life on earth. Course focuses on the important evolutionary breakthroughs during the history of life that survive to the present day as biological principles: replication by nucleic acids, biochemical systems, gene expression and control, mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, and protist diversity. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $75. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 205 Evolution and Diversity of Multicellular Organisms (Gen Biol II), Lecture and Laboratory

Evolution of fungi, plants, and animals (invertebrates and vertebrates); including development, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 207 Science of Life: Understanding Living Organisms

For non-science majors. Fulfills GE Natural Science Inquiry. This course introduces the basic principles of biology in three major components, the structure and function of living organisms, interactions of the organisms with their environment (ecology), and the ways organisms change over time (genetics and evolution). Lecture. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

BIOL 208 Introduction to Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as BCHM 208.) Prerequisite, BIOL 204, or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP, or IB Biology exam. Principles of molecular genetics with emphasis on molecular biology of DNA, RNA, and gene expression. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $100. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 210 Human Anatomy, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as HSK 210.)

BIOL 211 Principles of Physiology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 204. Foundational principles of physiology are presented in this introductory course. This course will explore laws and concepts governing the metabolism of organ systems along with laboratory activities that focus on specific organ systems. This course is especially appropriate for the athletic trainer, physical educator and health professional majors in that special emphasis is made on pulmonary, muscular, endocrine, neurologic, and cardiovascular systems. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

BIOL 301 Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205. A comprehensive survey of the major principles associated with the study of plants and fungi. This includes: biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, physiology, diversity, development, evolution, and ecology. The lab and lecture are highly integrated with the lab focusing on scientific method and experimental design. A basic working knowledge of biology will be assumed. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 302 Introduction to Bioinformatics

Prerequisites, BIO 208, CPSC 230. Students will learn how to use computer programming techniques to solve problems in biology. Students will learn the structure and capabilities of the Biopython library and will learn how to use it to automate searches of biological databases and to manipulate nucleotide and protein sequences. Data representation techniques and algorithms for sequence alignment, phylogenetic prediction, learning protein structure, and protein classification/clustering will be explored. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BIOL 319 Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205. Ecosystem ecology focuses on the flow of energy and materials through the living (e.g., plants, animals and microbes) and non-living (e.g., soils and the atmosphere) components of ecological systems. This course will explore cycles of water, energy, carbon, and nutrients in terrestrial ecosystems and how these cycles have been influenced by human activities. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 324 Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205. An introductory course focusing on principles of organisms' interactions with abiotic and biotic components of ecosystems. The course will include general principles of ecology and their contemporary application, as well as methods used in studying ecological interactions. A basic working knowledge of biology will be assumed. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 329 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 0–4 credits.

BIOL 330 General Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 208, CHEM 230, 230L. Patterns of inheritance involving a progression from Mendelian genetics to complex patterns of inheritance, cytogenetics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics, genetic mutations and culminating in an introduction to the molecular basis of inheritance. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 333 Animal Behavior, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205. An introduction to animal behavior and its relationship to fields such as psychology and neurobiology. Course explores mechanistic and evolutionary approaches to understanding behavior. Students observe behavior and write formal reports. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 337 Immunology

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, CHEM 230, 230L. Upper-division biology students are exposed to a broad overview of immunology. Cell-mediated and humoral immunology is studied in detail along with the complement system. The course concludes with a description of the abnormalities of the immune system, immunological disease, and hypersensitivity. Lecture. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BIOL 338 Ornithology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205, or consent of instructor. The biology of birds: a survey of avian diversity, evolution, systematics, behavior and conservation. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 355 Physiology of Drugs

Prerequisites, BIOL 102, or BIOL 204, or PSY 333. Students will learn about the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms of action of alcohol and other drugs causing physical dependency. Analytical thinking, writing, and analysis are emphasized. Lecture. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BIOL 365 Human Physiology Part A

(Same as HSK 365.)

BIOL 366 Human Physiology Part B, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as HSK 366.)

BIOL 401 Cancer Biology

(Same as BCHM 401.) Prerequisites, BIOL 208, BCHM 335. This course is intended for upper level undergraduate students who are interested in biomedical topics. Building on the student’s knowledge of cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, and physiology, the discussion will begin with the process of cell transformation and continue on to the mechanisms of uncontrolled cell division, the interactions between tumor cells and the (micro)environment, and the “renegade behavior” of cancer cells in metastasis. These principal stages of cancer will be emphasized by discussing the molecular pathways underlying signal transduction, cellular energetics, inflammation, and angiogenesis. The course also offers some insight into more clinical aspects of cancer, including diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and prediction to therapeutic intervention. Lecture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

BIOL 407 Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

Prerequisite, BIOL 204. Anatomy and function of the human central nervous system with emphasis on sensory and motor pathways. Lecture. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

BIOL 410 Developmental Biology

Prerequisite, BIOL 204. Students explore recent advances in knowledge about how organisms develop from a single fertilized egg through various embryonic stages to an adult organism. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BIOL 417 Microbiology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 208, CHEM 230, 230L. Characterization and classification of organisms that constitute the microbial world (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi) with an emphasis on microbial physiology and cellular structure. The various roles of microorganisms in the environment and in disease are examined. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $75. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 436 Molecular Genetics, Lecture and Laboratory

(Same as BCHM 436.) Prerequisites, BIOL 208, BCHM 335. Students will examine experimental approaches to issues in molecular biology using primary journal articles in conjunction to assigned textbook readings. Students will conduct laboratory exercises using advanced molecular biology techniques. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

BIOL 437 BioMedical Informatics

(Same as CPSC 435.) Prerequisite, CPSC 230. Students are introduced to contemporary research topics in medical informatics, including computational techniques for the collection, management, retrieval, and analysis of biomedical data. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

BIOL 440 Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, BIOL 205. Systematics, ecology, distribution of marine organisms. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 450 Cell Biology, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, BIOL 204, 208, CHEM 230, 230L. An approach to cell biology considering ultrastructure, cell's extracellular matrix, cellular physiology, including signal transduction between extracellular environment and cellular structure. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. Fee: $100. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

BIOL 490 Independent Internship

Gain experience working in the field you think you might like to enter. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–3 credits.

BIOL 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

BIOL 494 Senior Research: Data Analysis and Presentation

Prerequisites, biological sciences major, senior standing, consent of instructor. A workshop-style course in which students are mentored through the analysis and presentation of their independent research project. Students will conduct a thorough literature review, conduct statistical analyses, develop or refine writing skills, and learn how to make an effective presentation. To be accepted into the course, students must submit a two-page proposal to the faculty of biological sciences during the preceding fall semester. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

BIOL 496 Seminars: Biology Lecture Series

A series of seminars presented by guest lecturers, designed around a current issue of importance in biology. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

BIOL 498 Capstone Course for Biological Sciences Majors

Prerequisites, MATH 303, biological sciences major, senior standing, consent of instructor. A seminar course will be run according to the NSF-sponsored CREATE (consider, read, elucidate the hypotheses, analyze and interpret the data, and think of the next experiment). This class will use a guided analysis of a series of journal articles produced sequentially from a single lab or a series of papers from different labs focused on a single line of research to highlight the evolution of a research topic over a long period of time. Students will break down information from the paper and reassemble it into individual experiments as well as critically interpret the data. At the end of the semester, each student will write their own mini NSF grant proposal. The topic for discussion will vary from semester so that students can choose the capstone class most interesting to them. Lecture (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

BIOL 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, 3.000 average in biology courses, consent of instructor. Independent research/study in many different aspects of biology, from cell and molecular biology to organismal biology and field studies. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Chemistry

CHEM 101 Chemistry of Life

A course for non-science majors. Lectures cover organic chemistry and biochemistry with immediate application to students’ everyday lives with a local and global perspective. Topics include the chemical principles behind the molecular components of the human body, the oxygen-containing organic compounds we drink, taste and smell, fossil fuel power sources, human energy sources carbohydrates, fats and oils, and other chemicals in our bodies and environment (vitamins, hormones, pesticides, food additives, clothing polymers). Lecture. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 103 Chemistry of Health

CHEM 103 provides a survey of the basic concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry. CHEM 103 is for the non-science major and satisfies the general education science requirement. CHEM 103 is not for students needing to take CHEM 140, General Chemistry I. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 105 Chemistry of Environmental Issues

A course for non-science majors. The goal of this course is to provide non-science majors with a science background that will enable them to critically evaluate environmental issues as they are presented in mainstream media. Lectures cover the basic chemistry related to air pollution, global warming, ozone depletion, energy resources (e.g., fossil vs. alternative fuels), and water quality. Lecture. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 129 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest. May be repeatable for credit if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

CHEM 140 General Chemistry I

Corequisite, CHEM 140L, or previous credit for CHEM 140L. Introduction to fundamental concepts in chemistry: atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, equations and reactions, and kinetic theory of gases. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 140L General Chemistry I Laboratory

Corequisite, CHEM 140. Laboratory component taken with General Chemistry I. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credits.

CHEM 150 General Chemistry II

Prerequisites, CHEM 140, 140L. Corequisite, CHEM 150L, or previous credit for CHEM 150L. This is a continuation of general chemistry I. It features thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, kinetics, solids and liquids, electrochemistry, etc. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 150L General Chemistry II Laboratory

Prerequisites, CHEM 140, 140L. Corequisite, CHEM 150. Laboratory component taken with General Chemistry II. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credits.

CHEM 229 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 230 Organic Chemistry I

Prerequisites, CHEM 150, 150L, Corequisite, CHEM 230L or previous credit for CHEM 230L. Characteristic alkane, alkene, alkyl halide, and alcohol compounds are discussed with reference to theories, nomenclature, principle reactions, preparations, and spectroscopy. Lecture. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 230L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Prerequisites, CHEM 150, 150L. Corequisite, CHEM 230. Lab component for CHEM 230. Fee: $75. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

CHEM 234 Drugs Rx Us

For non-science majors. Drugs Rx Us is an introduction to drugs which have a large social impact on society. This course provides basic information about drug sources, history, and politics, but mostly drug actions in the body, side effects, medical uses, toxic effects, and abuse potential. (Offered interterm, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 299 Chemistry Research

Prerequisites, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 301 Inorganic Chemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 140, 150, or consent of instructor. Fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry, emphasis on atomic and molecular structure. Periodic table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions explained in terms of fundamental atomic and molecular structure, descriptive chemistry. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 4 credits.

CHEM 310 Analytical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, CHEM 150. Gravimetric, volumetric and introductory instrumental analysis techniques and related theory with particular emphasis on the statistical analysis of data, sample collection, and sample preparation. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

CHEM 325 Atmospheric Chemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 331, 340. This course will cover the important atmospheric chemistry of both the troposphere and stratosphere. Students will be introduced to the atmosphere, its structure, physical properties and the principles that govern its chemistry before moving on to look at more detailed chemistry, both heterogeneous and homogeneous, of the troposphere and stratosphere. The relationships between atmospheric chemistry and physical climate will be examined. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 326 Aquatic Chemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 331, 340. The study of natural water chemistry: a foundation in general principles and selected advanced topics. Special emphasis is given to chemical thermodynamics, redox processes, photochemistry, heterogeneous interactions, and kinetics. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CHEM 327 Environmental Geochemistry

Prerequisites, CHEM 331, 340. The field of environmental geochemistry involves the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the near-surface, low-temperature environment. Students will study a wide range of interactions between minerals, rocks, and water at the earths surface that have implications on a number of environmental issues including acid mine drainage, groundwater and surface water contamination, hazardous waste management, and natural resource exploration/use. Lecture. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 329 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry II

Prerequisites, CHEM 230, 230L. Corequisite, CHEM 331L, or previous credit for CHEM 331L. Students build upon the fundamentals learned in CHEM 230, 230L studying organic chemistry and spectroscopic analysis of carbonyl compounds, aromatic compounds, amines, biomolecules, and electrocyclic reactions. There is an emphasis on synthetic organic chemistry in CHEM 331, 331L. Lecture. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CHEM 331L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Prerequisites, CHEM 230, 230L. Corequisite, CHEM 331, or consent of instructor. CHEM 331L is the laboratory course for second semester organic chemistry. Experimental work will include organic syntheses and spectroscopic analysis of reaction products. Fee: $75. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

CHEM 340 Physical Chemistry I, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, PHYS 102, MATH 111, CHEM 150. Quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, and photochemistry. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

CHEM 411 Analytical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisites, CHEM 331, 340. Scientists have an impressive and growing array of powerful and elegant instruments for gathering qualitative and quantitative information about the composition of matter. The goal of this course is to teach students how to choose and use modern instrumentation correctly and efficiently. Students will learn the basic principles of operation of modern instrumentation, the components and configurations of current instruments, applications of instruments and strengths and weakness of different instrumental methods. The course will focus on spectroscopic methods of analysis. Students will get hands on experience using modern instruments in the laboratory. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

CHEM 429 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 432 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Prerequisite, CHEM 331. Students learn modern methods of organic synthesis and apply these by examining the total synthesis of organic compounds isolated from natural sources, some of which demonstrate medicinal properties. Lecture. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 438 Symmetry and Spectroscopy

Prerequisite, CHEM 331. Many molecules have symmetry that can be leveraged in order to predict relevant physical information of the molecule. In this course, students will learn how to take advantage of this symmetry to understand the energies, bonds, and spectra of molecules. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 441 Physical Chemistry II, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, CHEM 340. Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, reaction kinetics, liquid and gaseous states, reaction equilibrium, phase equilibrium, surface chemistry, electrochemistry, statistical mechanics. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

CHEM 450 Selected Advanced Topics in Chemistry

Prerequisites, depends on topics offered. Study of advanced topics including qualitative organic analysis, advanced organic chemistry, medical pharmacology, radiochemistry, polymer chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, group theory and spectroscopy, and toxicology. Lecture. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CHEM 451 Molecular Spectroscopy

Prerequisite, CHEM 340, or PHYS 451. The interaction of light with matter is one of the most important experimental probes for studying atomic and molecular structure. In this course, students will learn how to use quantum mechanics and spectroscopy to explore and build a better understanding of the microscopic world. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CHEM 490 Independent Internship

P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CHEM 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Computer Science

CPSC 220 Scientific Computing I

(Same as MATH 220, PHYS 220.)

CPSC 229 Experimental Course

Computer Science experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) ½–4 credits.

CPSC 230 Computer Science I

Students are introduced to problem-solving methods and algorithm development through an interactive and easy-to-learn programming language, Python. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 231 Computer Science II

Prerequisite, CPSC 230, or equivalent. This course is a comprehensive study of object-oriented computing with a mainstream programming language, Java. The course introduces the principal features of the language with a focus on object-oriented development, code reuse, and large program structure. The course also covers advance topics such as concurrency and graphical user interfaces. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 236 Visual Programming

Prerequisite, CPSC 230. Students learn the essentials of visual programming language such as C# or Visual Basic. Emphasis is placed on using controls to build graphical user interfaces. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 242 Introduction to the Game Industry

Students learn the history of electronic games and gaming platforms, the development cycle of electronic games, the roles and responsibilities of the members of a game production team, and the roles of interface design, mathematics, artificial intelligence and storytelling in game development. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 244 Level Design I

Prerequisites, CPSC 230, 242. Students learn to create interactive simulation software through the use and programming of a professional level editor with an emphasis on scripting techniques. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 250 Computer Systems and Assembly Language Programming

Prerequisite, CPSC 231, or equivalent. Students learn basic programming and program structure in an assembly language and gain experience with machine language and instructions, execution, addressing and representation of data, macros, subroutines, linkages, and recursive routines. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 260 Introduction to Robotics

Prerequisite, CPSC 230. Students learn how to program a robot to interact with the environment via light, sonar, rotation, and touch sensors. Students will also learn the physics of translational motion, rotational motion, and forces as applied to the study of robotics, as well as basic engineering concepts. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 285 Social and Ethical Issues in Computing

Prerequisite, CPSC 230. This course considers a range of ethical and social issues related to the effects of computers on how we live, focusing on broad social issues as well as individual responsibilities. Privacy and intellectual property (e.g. P2P downloading), software licenses, software reliability, and risks. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 290 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

CPSC 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CPSC 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

CPSC 308 Enterprise Data Management

Prerequisite, CPSC 230, or 236. CPSC 308 is an introductory course on data management, with emphasis on database systems for organizations. Students will learn the fundamentals of data storage and retrieval, gaining hands-on experience with the Structured Query Language (SQL) and a contemporary relational database management system. Students will also be exposed to advances in NoSQL technologies, which provide alternative storage mechanisms for noisy and unstructured data. Students majoring in Computer Science, Software Engineering, or Computer Information Systems may not use CPSC 308 to fulfill major requirements. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 320 Quantum Information Science

(Same as PHYS 340.)

CPSC 329 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Computer Science experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CPSC 330 Digital Logic Design I

(Same as PHYS 330.) Prerequisite, MATH 250. Corequisite, CPSC 330L. Students learn the fundamental principles and practice of digital logic. The course covers binary numbers and arithmetic. Students study Boolean algebra as a method of reasoning about sequential circuits including truth tables and Karnaugh maps, logic minimization, gates and flipflops, sequential logic, and combinatorial logic. The course requires one hour of supervised work in a laboratory in addition to three hours per week of lecture. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 330L Lab - Digital Logic Design I

(Same as PHYS 330L.) Prerequisite, MATH 250. Corequisite, CPSC 330. Laboratory component of CPSC 330. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credits.

CPSC 340 Game Development

Prerequisites, CPSC 244, and CPSC 231, or 236. Game Development covers programming techniques for writing a broad range of computer video games including 2D arcade style, isometric, 3D and networked games. Students will learn to program with a professional game development engine. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 344 Level Design II

Prerequisite, CPSC 244. Students learn to create interactive simulation software through the use and programming of professional game design software with a focus on 3-D rendering and advanced AI Scripting. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 348 Software Engineering

Prerequisite, CPSC 231, or 236. Students study the system development life cycle. The emphasis is on software design, from requirements elicitation to detailed design with UML and implementation/testing with standard tools. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CPSC 350 Data Structures and Algorithms

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Students study core data structures and algorithms, such as arrays, stacks, lists, queues, trees, hash tables, graphs; search and sort. Students engage on projects that involve individually chosen advanced data structures and algorithms. The focus is on applications of data structures and algorithms, utilization of existing practical data sets, and performance trade-offs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 351 Computer Architecture I

Prerequisites, CPSC 250, 330. Students learn the organization and structure of the major hardware components of computers to understand the mechanics of information transfer and control within a digital computer system and the fundamentals of logic design. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 352 Computer Architecture II

Prerequisite, CPSC 351. Topics include the design and analysis of instruction set processors, memory management, multi-processors, and networks. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 353 Data Communications and Computer Networks

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Students explore the principles and techniques of data communications and give special emphasis to networks and distributed systems. The I.S.O. Reference Model for open systems interconnection will be investigated and the function and operation of each protocol layer analyzed in detail. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 354 Programming Languages

Prerequisite, CPSC 350. Students develop an understanding of the organization and design of programming languages through a comparative study of fundamental language structures. Students engage in semester-long projects that involve individually chosen programming languages and applications. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 355 Human Computer Interaction

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Students study the foundations of human-interaction, with emphasis on user-centered design methodologies. Topics such as usability, human factors, user studies, and multi-model interfaces will be explored, and the theory put into practice through programming projects that develop graphical user interfaces and applications for the Android or iPhone/iPad. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 356 Android Application Development

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. An introduction to app development using the Android operating system and development kit. Students will learn the fundamentals of mobile embedded programming and apply their skills to implement non-trivial projects on target hardware such as smart phones and tablets. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CPSC 357 iOS Application Development

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. An introduction to app development using the iOS operating system and Swift. Students will learn the fundamentals of mobile embedded programming and apply their skills to implement non-trivial projects on target hardware such as ipads, iphones, and watches. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CPSC 360 Computer Graphics

Prerequisite, CPSC 350. The fundamental concepts of graphics software, hardware, and standards are examined. The course gives special emphasis to three-dimensional graphics and provides an introduction to graphical user interfaces. (Offered interterm, alternate years.) 3 credits.

CPSC 366 Digital Logic Design II

Prerequisites, MATH 251, CPSC 330. The course introduces combinational and sequential logic circuits, including decoders, multiplexers, flip–flops, arithmetic circuits, and implementations of finite state machines using hardware design languages and FPGA boards. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 370 Topics in Computer Science

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 380 Operating Systems

Prerequisite, CPSC 350. The course emphasizes the major principles of operating system design and the interrelationship between the operating system and the hardware. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CPSC 390 Artificial Intelligence

Prerequisites, MATH 250, CPSC 350. Students study the tools, techniques, and applications of artificial intelligence. Students will be introduced to the programming techniques utilized in artificial intelligence applications. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 392 Introduction to Data Science

Prerequisite, CPSC 230. This course provides a survey of algorithms, tools, and techniques for computing with Big Data. Students will be exposed to fundamental concepts in data mining, machine learning, and information retrieval systems, with special emphasis on statistical techniques for data visualization and analysis. Recent advances in high performance computing, such as map-reduce, will be presented in the context of Big Data. Students will apply data mining algorithms to data sets from biology, chemistry, social media, and industry. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 399 Individual Study

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

CPSC 402 Compiler Construction

Prerequisites, MATH 250, CPSC 350, 354. Students examine techniques involved in the analysis and interpretation of source–language statements and the generation of object code. Students analyze and modify a functional object-oriented compiler. Students engage on semester-long projects that involve the design and implementation of individually chosen languages features. Working knowledge of the Java programming language is required. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 406 Algorithm Analysis

Prerequisites, MATH 250, CPSC 350. Students study ideas and techniques useful for designing and analyzing data structures and algorithms. In particular, the analytic tools needed for analyzing upper bounds for algorithms and lower bounds for problems will be covered. Problem areas include sorting, graph–based problems, dynamic programming, combinatorial algorithms, computational geometry, encryption, parallel and distributed models, and NP–completeness. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 408 Database Management

Prerequisites, CPSC 236, 350. Students learn data management concepts and the representation and structure of data in the context of applications and system software. The emphasis is on design of databases and developing applications in a clientserver environment using SQL as the query language. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 430 Computational Economics

(Same as CS 531, MGSC 530.) Prerequisites, MATH 110, and CPSC 230, or 236, or consent of instructor. This course will introduce students to the computational tools required to understand electronic exchange systems and implement economic experiments. Students will be required to become familiar with numerical analysis, computer simulation and programming of experiments. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

CPSC 435 BioMedical Informatics

(Same as BIOL 437, CS 635.)

CPSC 440 Collaborative Game Development

Prerequisite, CPSC 340. This is a capstone project course in which students design and develop games in collaborative projects. Working with faculty and visiting industry experts, students propose a concept for a computer game or applied interactive simulation, developing that concept over the course of the semester through several stages of specification and prototyping. Final prototypes are entered in a competition at the end of the course whose jury may include representatives from game and simulation development companies. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CPSC 445 High Performance Computing

Prerequisite, CPSC 350, or consent of instructor. The course introduces students to parallel computing architectures and programming models. Students learn and practice parallel programming techniques using shared memory and message passing. Course topics include parallel computing fundamentals, Unix and C, shared memory parallel computing (with OpenMP), message passing parallel computing (with MPI), parallel performance evaluation, and multilevel parallel computing (with OpenMP and MPI combined). (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

CPSC 453 Network Implementation and Security

Prerequisite, CPSC 353. Students explore the principles and techniques for implementing TCP/IP based networks using Microsoft Windows and Linux servers and clients, including the skills to configure, customize, optimize, troubleshoot, and integrate networks. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 458 Web Engineering

Prerequisites, CPSC 350, 408. Students explore the principles and techniques for developing and managing web applications using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript, as well as other web development frameworks such as Ruby on Rails. Students will acquire skills to develop, install, configure, customize, optimize, and troubleshoot web applications. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 465 Integrated Circuit Design I

Prerequisites, MATH 211, CPSC 366. Recommended, PHYS 102. This course introduces the student to circuit analysis, including transient and sinusoidal steady–state analysis, complex frequency, and Bode plots. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 466 Integrated Circuit Design II

Prerequisites, CPSC 330, 465. Recommended, PHYS 102. The course integrates theoretical and functional ideas from Digital Logic II with the physical electronics covered in Integrated Circuit Design I toward the design of real–world integrated circuits. The course also introduces the student to VLSI CAD tools for physical design. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

CPSC 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CPSC 498 Senior Project

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CPSC 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Environmental Science

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Science

Environmental science is an applied, interdisciplinary field focused on understanding environmental problems and proposing viable solutions. Course is designed to develop skills to analyze causes of environmental problems and their potential solutions from a primarily natural science perspective. Intended for environmental science and policy majors and minors. Lecture. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 102 Introduction to Environmental Policy

The historical, theoretical and philosophical foundations of environmentalism in the United States. Course provides an overview of environmental thought, the conservation and environmental movements, and introduces the student to different policy responses to historical and contemporary environmental challenges. Intended for environmental science and policy majors and minors. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 103 Introduction to Earth Systems

Introduction to fundamental physical and scientific principles that govern the four subsystems (lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere) of the larger Earth System. Course emphasizes how these systems and their interactions are important for understanding the Earth processes, environmental change, and impacts on the Earth’s resources. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 111 Physical Geology

Corequisite, ENV 111L. Introduction to the primary geologic principles and processes of our planet. Topics include the structure and history of the earth, the unifying theory of plate tectonics, earth materials, the rock cycle, volcanoes, earthquakes, and the hydrologic cycle. The laboratory emphasizes hands on experiments involving scientific problems-solving and an introduction to some of the tools and techniques used by geologists today. Lecture, laboratory. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 111L Physical Geology Laboratory

Corequisite, ENV 111. Lab component to ENV 111. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

ENV 112 Introduction to Hazards and Global and Environmental Change

Students are introduced to global climate change and hazards. Different types of natural hazards such as Earthquakes, Hurricanes and Dust Storms and resultant impacts worldwide are discussed. Rock, Hydrological, Tectonic and Bio-geochemical cycles are discussed along with the plate tectonics and continental drift theories and the fundamentals of understanding natural hazards. Connection of global climate change to hazards and conclusions of how societies may face them will be drawn. Remote Sensing, Satellite technology and modeling will also be introduced as important tools in studying global climate change and related hazards. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 199 Individual Study

Faculty consent required. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

ENV 205 Seminar Series

Students will focus on an integrated understanding of environmental science and policy issues through attendance at weekly seminars where faculty, students and outside speakers present their work on environmental issues and through critical discussions and evaluation of assigned readings in the primary literature. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

ENV 227 Darwin and the Galapagos

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students learn about the environmental uniqueness of the Galapagos Islands and how Charles Darwin's observations in this “living laboratory” led to a theory of evolution by natural selection, considered one of the major breakthroughs in scientific thought. Students participate in a required field trip to the Galapagos Islands (Ecuador) to observe first–hand the biodiversity that Darwin saw. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm and summer as needed.) 4 credits.

ENV 229 Experimental Course

Environmental Science and Policy experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. As a lower-division course, this course is not intended to count as an elective towards the different Areas of Study (Ecology, Earth Systems or Policy) within the Environmental Science and Policy degree. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 0–4 credits.

ENV 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENV 299 Individual Study

Prerequisites, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

ENV 301 Environmental Geology

Prerequisite, ENV 111, or 112. A study of the environmental implications of geological processes as they relate to human interactions. Topics include natural disasters, water issues, mineral and energy resources, and metal contamination. Lecture and optional weekend field trips. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENV 310 Geographic Information Systems

Corequisite, ENV 310L. Structure, concepts, and application of geographic information systems (GIS): computer–based systems designed to process large spatial databases. Productive use of GIS in physical and social sciences, environmental management, and regional planning is investigated through applied exercises and problems. Lecture. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 310L Geographic Information Systems Lab

Corequisite, ENV 310. Structure, concepts, and application of geographic information systems (GIS): computer–based systems designed to process large spatial databases. Productive use of GIS in physical and social sciences, environmental management, and regional planning is investigated through applied exercises and problems. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

ENV 320 Earth System Science

Prerequisites, ENV 111, 111L, or 112. Earth system science explores the connections between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and atmosphere. This course will investigate short- and long-term changes in earth systems using a variety of seismological, meteorological and environmental monitoring networks using both quantitative and qualitative approaches to better understand geophysics and earth processes. Lecture. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENV 329 Experimental Course

Environmental Science and Policy experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. Depending on topic, course will count towards different Areas of Study (Ecology, Earth Systems or Policy) within the Environmental Science and Policy degree. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) ½–4 credits.

ENV 330 Environmental Problem Solving: Energy and Matter Flow

Prerequisites, ENV 101, PHYS 107, CHEM 150, BIOL 205. An exploration of how simple mathematical methods can be used to understand the influence of human and environmental factors on the flux of energy and matter. The course covers box models, thermodynamics and energy transfer, chemical equilibrium theory, biogeochemistry, and climatology in the context of global change. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 374 Environmental Politics and Policy

(Same as POSC 374.)

ENV 375 Public Policy Process

(Same as POSC 375.)

ENV 420 Environmental Hydrology

Prerequisites, ENV 101, and ENV 111/111L, or 112. A qualitative overview of the occurrence, distribution, quality and movement of water in the environment; introduction to quantitative methods for analyzing hydrologic processes. Weekend field trip required. Lecture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENV 440 Remote Sensing of the Environment

Prerequisites, ENV 111, 111L, or 112. Students are introduced how to utilize remotely sensed data to its full potential and how to extract useful information from satellite data. The main emphasis of this course is to shed the light on the physical principals of remote sensing and how to apply to different application topics like remote sensing of vegetation, water, soils, minerals, geomorphology and urban landscaping. Image processing techniques and data manipulation will be also introduced to this class. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENV 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

ENV 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

ENV 498 Environmental Problem Solving: Senior Capstone and Seminar

Prerequisites, ENV 310, 330, 374. Interdisciplinary exploration of the scientific, social and economic issues associated with a specific local environmental problem. Students from the three areas of study (Ecology, Earth Systems and Policy) will identify a local environmental issue and work together to produce a proposed solution by the end of the semester. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENV 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. For juniors or seniors. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Food Science

FSN 120 Introduction to Food Science

An overview of the interactions among basic disciplines of science and technology which are integrated into the development of more wholesome, stable, and nutritious food products. General principles are stressed using examples which demonstrate the progression of raw agricultural commodities through the integrated technologies which result in commercial food products. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 200 Nutrition for Life

Make better dietary choices and dispel misconceptions by exploring the science of nutrition. Discussions will center on facts and fictions about nutrients and diets, health foods, and processed foods. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 201 International Nutrition: The World Food Crisis

Contemporary nutritional issues affecting the world. Social, cultural, political, economic, and scientific aspects of world food problems are examined. Nutritional deficiencies affecting various world regions and the role of international agencies are covered. Students learn about food production and food supplementation programs, and examine possible solutions for the future. Lecture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 303 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism

Prerequisites, FSN 200, and CHEM 103, or 140, and HSK 112, or BIOL 211, or BIOL 366, or HSK 366. An in-depth look at the digestion, absorption, metabolism, storage, excretion, and interrelationships of nutrients. Nutritional biochemistry and metabolism as it relates to establishment of nutrient requirements, markers of nutritional deficiency or excess, gene expression and chronic diseases. Advances the investigative approach to scientific concepts in nutrient metabolism. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

FSN 322 Community Nutrition

Prerequisite, FSN 303. Study of the roles and resources of community/public health nutrition professionals promoting wellness in the community. Assessment of community nutritional needs, and planning, implementing and evaluating nutrition education programs for various age groups under different socio-economic conditions. The legislative process, health care insurance industry, and domestic food assistance programs will also be covered. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

FSN 338 Nutrition and Human Performance

Prerequisite, FSN 303. Designed to provide an in-depth view of nutrition, metabolism, and human performance. Ergogenic aids, blood doping, nutritional needs of the athlete are emphasized. The methodologies and current topics in nutrition and human performance are evaluated. Mechanisms of nutrition are presented to better understand the cause-and-effect relationships of human nutrition. Lecture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 339 Lifecycle Nutrition

Prerequisite, FSN 303. The human body has different nutrient requirements at different times during the life cycle and when in a disease state. Students explore the physiological changes, adaptations, and stresses that affect nutritional status and explain the influence of dietary practices in maximum growth, maintenance, and health. Nutrition counseling and diet analyses are included. Lecture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 429 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, junior standing. Experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. May be repeated for credit, if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

FSN 443 Medical Nutrition Therapy

Prerequisite, FSN 303. This course is designed to increase the students' knowledge of the pathophysiology of various disease states. Principles of dietary management as a preventative and therapeutic tool in health care will be emphasized during various physiologic changes such as disease, metabolic alterations and stress. Students will learn how to modify the normal diet for the prevention and treatment of diseases. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

FSN 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Appropriate work experience without pay. Ten hours per week for three credits. P/NP. May be repeatable for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

FSN 499 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected undergraduate research projects involving either literature studies or laboratory research which develop new information, correlations, concepts or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Mathematics

MATH 098 Elementary Algebra

This course is designed to fill the needs of those students whose mathematical training is not sufficient to meet the prerequisites of college level courses requiring mathematical skills. Topics include the basic arithmetic operations, solving of linear equations and inequalities, graphing and linear systems, exponents and polynomials, factoring, and rational expression operations. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 non-degree credits.

MATH 099 Intermediate Algebra

Prerequisite, MATH 098. This course is designed to fill the needs of those students whose mathematical training is not sufficient to meet the prerequisites of college level courses requiring mathematical skills. Topics include equations with absolute values, compound inequalities, inequalities involving absolute value, the slope of a line, the equation of a line, the concept of a function, composition of functions, rational exponents and roots, quadratic functions, and quadratic equations, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions. The course meets for 4 hours per week. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 non-degree credits.

MATH 104 Pre-Calculus Mathematics

Prerequisite, MATH 099, or appropriate placement exam score. Topics include functions and graphs, linear, quadratic, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, and inverse trigonometric functions. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 108 The Nature of Mathematics

Prerequisite, MATH 099, or equivalent. The course will explore a range of practical mathematical topics including financial management, logic, and probability. Problem solving is a main focus of the course. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 109 Calculus with Applications in Business and Social Science

Prerequisite, MATH 099, or equivalent. In this course, students study the mathematical theory of continuous change with emphasis on using the theory to analyze real world phenomena. The key ideas have to do with how quantities (prices changes, for example) relate to their rate of change (inflation). Study includes sequences, limits, theory and interpretation of differentiation and integration, and the key linking idea: The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Applications include marginal analysis, optimization, modeling by differential equations. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 110 Single Variable Calculus I

Prerequisite, MATH 104, or equivalent. Students study single variable functions, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of derivatives (approximations, curve plotting, related rates, optimization), antiderivatives, the definite integral and applications. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 111 Single Variable Calculus II

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Further techniques and applications of integration, transcendental functions, analytic geometry in two dimensions, polar coordinates, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 120 Introduction to Cryptography: The Mathematics of Privacy

Prerequisite, MATH 099. The course introduces students to the underlying theory and current practice of cryptography with a strong emphasis on the necessary mathematical and computations ideas that provide fundamental building blocks for a meeting strong cryptographic standards. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

MATH 203 Introduction to Statistics

Prerequisite, MATH 099, or equivalent. Students study the design of experiments, descriptive statistics, analysis of data, parametric and non-parametric statistics, correlation and regression, probability, sampling, and tests of significance. Examples from the social sciences and the natural sciences are used to illustrate the concepts. The course is taught in a computer classroom in which students will learn how to use statistical software. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 208 Foundations of Geometry

Prerequisite, MATH 099, or equivalent. This course provides student with notions of Euclidian and non–Euclidian geometries, systems of axioms and geometric models, classical theorems, and geometric transformations. The main objective of this course is to provide students with a solid understanding of the history, development, and philosophical significance of Geometry in the context of its rigorous mathematical foundations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 210 Multivariable Calculus

Prerequisite, MATH 111. Students learn the calculus of functions of two or more variables and of vector–valued functions as well as multiple integrals and integration in vector fields. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

MATH 211 Linear Algebra

Prerequisite, MATH 111. Students study vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 220 Scientific Computing I

(Same as CPSC 220, PHYS 220.)

MATH 229 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 250 Discrete Mathematics I

Prerequisite, MATH 104, or equivalent. This course provides the student with an introduction to the fundamental mathematics of discrete phenomena and computation. This is a key course in the CPSC curriculum as it provides the theoretical background needed for many upper-division courses including Data Structures (combinatorics, formal languages), Logic Design (Boolean algebras, number representation) and Integrated Circuit Design (automata theory, finite state minimization, graph layout). (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

MATH 251 Discrete Mathematics II

Prerequisite, MATH 250. This course covers binary relations with applications to ordered sets, graphs, trees and sorting, followed by topics on Boolean algebras, basic digital circuits, formal languages, and finite state automata. It provides the background and computational tools needed for handling discrete mathematical structures that are used in many applications such as artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, and data mining. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 260 Number Theory

Prerequisite, MATH 111, or equivalent. This course covers the ring of integers, divisibility, prime numbers and factorization, number–theoretic functions such as the Moebius function and the Euler function, congruences, Moebius inversion, perfect numbers, Diophantine equations, and quadratic residues. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 270 Computational Mathematics Tools

Prerequisite, MATH 111, or 250, or consent of instructor. In the first part of this course, students will learn LaTeX, a scientific document preparation system, and how to produce high quality mathematical documents with typeset formulas and proofs. The middle part of this course introduces students to computer algebra systems, with an emphasis on the open source system Sage, and mathematical programming in Sage/Python. The third part of this course is designed to give students experience with the Matlab programming language. Matlab is used for scientific applications involving images, sound, and other signals. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 280 Mathematics Tutoring

Prerequisite, MATH 104, or equivalent. The course will provide an exploration of the theory and practice of math peer tutoring and will provide training in the knowledge and fundamental skills useful to math tutors. Through readings, lectures, class discussions, group work, and activities, students will be introduced to the academic and personal skills that characterize effective tutors. The course will provide an introduction to contemporary learning theories and learning enhancement techniques and will assist students in developing appropriate applications to individual and group learning situations. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 290 Independent Internship

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

MATH 291 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

MATH 299 Individual Study

Prerequisites, freshman, or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor. For students who wish to pursue a special area of study not included in the curriculum. To enroll in individual study and research, students must complete the individual study and research form (available from the Office of the University Registrar) and obtain the signatures of the department chair of the course and course instructor. Students should spend 40 to 50 hours in instruction and research for each credit of individual study. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

MATH 303 Biostatistics

Prerequisite, MATH 104. This course will provide you with a comprehensive introduction to various statistical methods with emphasis on applications in Biology, Medicine and Public Health. Main concepts such as sampling distributions, contingency tables, linear, logistic and survival analysis will be studied from a more mathematically solid viewpoint. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 310 History of Mathematics

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Chronological study of the development of mathematics. Emphasis on the solution of selected mathematical problems associated with historical periods. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 350 Differential Equations

Prerequisite, MATH 211. This course covers first-order differential equations, linear equations of higher order, introduction to systems of differential equations, linear systems of differential equations, and Laplace transform methods. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

MATH 360 Probability Theory

Prerequisite, MATH 210. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of probability theory. Topics include counting techniques, probability, conditional probability, Bayes theorem, multivariate distributions, discrete and continuous probability distributions, functions of random variables, marginal distributions, Central Limit Theorem, and sampling distributions. This course is a prerequisite for Mathematical Statistics. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 361 Mathematical Statistics

Prerequisite, MATH 360. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in statistics. Topics include modes of convergence, maximum likelihood, UMVUE, Rao-Kramer theorem, sufficiency and completeness, Lehmann-Scheffe theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, generalized likelihood ratio test, tests for genetic association, contingency tables, and linear models. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 370 Special Topics in Mathematics

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 380 Introduction to Abstract Algebra

Prerequisite, MATH 250. A first course on algebraic structures, including semigroups, monoids and groups, with many examples, some basic concepts and results about these structures (subalgebras, homomorphisms, Cayle's theorem, Langrange's Theorem, isomorphism theorems, modular arithmetic) and applications to error-correcting codes, and cryptography. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 390 Introduction to Differential Geometry

Prerequisite, MATH 210. Students will learn elements of elementary Differential Geometry. They will study the classification of curves and surfaces in the Euclidean Space, as well as enter the world of abstract surfaces. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

MATH 440 Topology

Prerequisite, MATH 211. Topology studies the general concept of continuity and properties of spaces that are preserved by continuous functions. Important topics include: Construction of topological spaces and continuous functions, nets and filters, density, connectedness, compactness, metrizable spaces, Tychonoff's Theorem, separation axioms especially Hausdorff separation, Scott topologies, and sober spaces. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 450 Real Analysis

Prerequisite, MATH 210. A course in advanced calculus and real analysis. Properties of the real number system, sequences and series of real numbers, the Heine-Borel and Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorems, continuity and uniform continuity, sequences, and series of functions. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 451 Complex Analysis

Prerequisite, MATH 450. Rigorous treatment of basic complex analysis: complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy integral theory and its consequences, power series, residue calculus harmonic functions, and conformal mapping. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 454 Numerical Analysis

Prerequisite, MATH 211. Students study and come to understand the basic algorithms of numerical computation as used in approximation, numerical integration and differentiation, solution of equations, and solution of differential equations. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

MATH 460 Modern Algebra

Prerequisite, MATH 380. Concepts from group theory are extended to cover rings, integral domains, fields, vector spaces, and Galois theory, with applications to geometry, algebraic coding theory, and solvability of polynomials by radicals. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

MATH 464 Game Theory I

(Same as ECON 464.)

MATH 470 Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

(Same as PHYS 450.)

MATH 481 Economic Systems Design I: Principles and Experiments

(Same as ECON 481.)

MATH 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

MATH 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

MATH 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, B average in mathematics courses, consent of instructor. Independent research/study in many different aspects of mathematics, from algebra and analysis to applied mathematics. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Physics

PHYS 101 General Physics I

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Corequisite, PHYS 101L. Students study mechanics, wave motion, and heat. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 101L Lab-General Physics I

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Corequisite, PHYS 101. This is the lab component for PHYS 101. Students study mechanics, wave motion, and heat. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credits.

PHYS 102 General Physics II

Prerequisites, PHYS 101, MATH 111. Corequisite, PHYS 102L. Students study electricity, magnetism, light, introduction to atomic structure. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 102L Lab-General Physics II

Prerequisites, PHYS 101, MATH 111. Corequisite, PHYS 102. This is the lab component for PHYS 102. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credits.

PHYS 107 General Physics for the Life Sciences I, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, MATH 110. Students study mechanics, and thermodynamics. Students will learn how physics principles apply to the workings of living organisms and standard diagnostic tools used in life science. This course is intended to fill the physics requirement for life science majors and pre-medical preparation. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered fall semester.) 4 credits.

PHYS 108 General Physics for the Life Sciences II, Lecture and Laboratory

Prerequisite, MATH 111. Students study electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic physics. Students will learn how physics principles apply to the workings of living organisms and standard diagnostic tools used in life science. This course is intended to fill the physics requirement for life science majors and pre-medical preparation. This course includes a lecture and required laboratory component held at different times. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PHYS 117 The Beauty of Physics

This course focuses on how physics describes and explains real life phenomena in an intuitive way with little mathematics. It emphasizes understanding ideas as the foundation of modern science for non-scientists. The course will also discuss the relationship of physics to the arts and creative processes and science fiction. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 145 Introduction to Applications in Computational Science

(Same as BIOL 145.)

PHYS 201 General Physics III

Prerequisite, PHYS 102. Students study thermodynamics and waves, including an exploration into the fields of physics that stem from the study of waves, such as quantum mechanics, atomic physics and nuclear physics, where here is no longer a distinction between particles and waves. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 202 Modern Physics

Prerequisites, PHYS 201, MATH 210, or consent of instructor. An introduction, based upon landmark experiments, to the major developments in physics of the early 20th century. Topics to be covered include special relativity, relativistic energy and momentum, de Broglie waves, Schrodinger's equation, spatial quantum numbers, spin-orbit interaction, atomic spectra, uncertainty principle, exclusion principle, Zeeman effect, binding, nuclear reactions. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 207 General Physics for the Life Sciences III

Prerequisites, MATH 111, and PHYS 101, or 107. Fluids, Oscillations, Waves, Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory of Gases, Optics (Geometric optics, Images, Interference, Diffraction), introduction to atomic and nuclear physics. Students will learn how these physics principles apply to the workings of living organisms and standard diagnostic tools used in the life sciences. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 220 Scientific Computing I

(Same as CPSC 220, MATH 220.) Prerequisites, CPSC 230, 231. This example-driven course introduces computation as a tool for scientific exploration. Topics include manuscript preparation with LaTeX and Jupyter, test-driven development, numerical methods with arrays/dataframes, and symbolic computation. Modern languages like Python and MATLAB are emphasized, along with brief introductions to Julia, Sage, and Mathematica. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 229 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PHYS 250 Mathematical Methods in Physics

Prerequisites, PHYS 201, MATH 210. MATH 211 recommended. The course introduces students to mathematics used in contemporary physics. Numerous applications from classical mechanics, electrodynamics, and quantum mechanics are included as demonstrations of mathematical techniques. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 320 Mechanics I

Prerequisites, PHYS 101, MATH 210, 211. Students expand the skills they learned in General Physics I. They increase their understanding and problem solving skills in advanced classical mechanics. Computational methods are emphasized. Student who have taken MATH 350 previously will find it very useful. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PHYS 321 Mechanics II

Prerequisite, PHYS 320. Students will learn nonlinear dynamics and chaos, Hamiltonian mechanics, collision theory, special relativity, and continuum mechanics. Problem solving and physical reasoning skills will be emphasized. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 326 Cosmology

Prerequisites, PHYS 101, 102. Introduction to modern astronomy, astronomical observations including from space observations and associated theory. The course emphasizes astrophysical processes, birth and death of stars, stellar evolution, formation of elements; planetary systems, star clusters, the Milky Way galaxy. The student will learn forefront topics of modern astronomy, including binary stars, compact galactic sources, white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. High energy observations and theories of accreting sources. Finally, the student will learn topics of modern cosmology, the expansion of the universe, active galaxies and the future of the universe. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PHYS 330 Digital Logic Design I

(Same as CPSC 330.)

PHYS 330L Lab - Digital Logic Design I

(Same as CPSC 330L.)

PHYS 340 Quantum Information Science

(Same as CPSC 320.) Prerequisites, MATH 211, CPSC 230. This multi-disciplinary course introduces the study of finite-dimensional collections of quantum bits. Using the circuit model of quantum computation, the course illustrates concrete algorithms that show an advantage over classical methods, including those discovered by Deutch-Josza, Simon, Grover, and Shor, along with basic error correction. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 370 Special Topics in Physics

Prerequisite, PHYS 202, or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

PHYS 405 Seminar in Multidisciplinary Perspectives

Prerequisites, junior standing, PHYS 202 (with a grade of C or higher). Students examine a current issue in physics from a variety of different disciplinary perspectives. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism I

Prerequisites, PHYS 102, 250. Students study advanced topics in electricity and magnetism. These include boundary value problems, mutual generation of electromagnetic fields, electromagnetic radiation, and the relation between special relativity and electromagnetism. Computational methods are emphasized. Lecture. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PHYS 422 Electricity and Magnetism II

Prerequisites, PHYS 250, 421. The course introduces students to advanced topics in electricity and magnetism: conservation laws, electromagnetic waves, gauge symmetry, radiation, relativistic electrodynamics. The emphasis is placed on precise mathematical formulation of physical laws and development of computational techniques essential in applications. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 429 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

PHYS 430 Thermodynamics I

Prerequisite, PHYS 202. Students study the fundamentals of thermal physics, and the elegant regularities that emerge in systems of many particles. Computational methods are emphasized. Lecture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 431 Thermodynamics II

Prerequisites, MATH 350, PHYS 430. The course emphasizes that the combination of microscopic concepts with some statistical postulates leads readily to conclusions on a purely macroscopic level. First, basic probability concepts introduced and statistical methods used throughout all of physics. Statistical ideas are then applied to systems of particles in equilibrium to enhance an understanding of the basic notions of statistical mechanics, from which derive the purely macroscopic general statements of thermodynamics. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 450 Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

(Same as MATH 470.) Prerequisite, MATH 211. This course explores the mathematical and conceptual foundations of quantum theory. Exemplar experiments motivate discussion throughout, including quantum interference, EPR-Bell nonlocality, delayed choice experiments, interaction-free measurement, and geometric phases. Topics include operational quantum theory, ontological models, and interpretations of quantum theory. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 451 Quantum Mechanics

Prerequisites, PHYS 202, 250. Students study the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, its historical development, and its application. Computational methods are emphasized. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

PHYS 452 Quantum Mechanics II

Prerequisite, PHYS 451. Students will study advanced quantum mechanics, its applications and an introduction to quantum information science including quantum computing and communication. Topics include time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, the variational principle, the adiabatic approximation, the WKB approximation, quantum information science, quantum teleportation, quantum computing and quantum paradoxes. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHYS 491 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PHYS 498 Senior Capstone Research and Seminar

Prerequisites, PHYS 320, 421. Interdisciplinary exploration of physics and computational science. Students will identify an issue and work together to produce a proposed solution by the end of the semester. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHYS 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, approval of petition. Supervised individual study in selected areas of physics. Maybe repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Science

SCI 329 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 0–3 credits.

SCI 400 Applying to Graduate Programs in the Sciences

This 1-credit seminar is intended for students who intend to apply to research-based Ph.D. graduate programs in the natural or applied sciences during the fall semester. It will cover best practices and include targeted assignments to help students craft their graduate school and fellowship applications for maximum success, including: - Identifying your desired subfield - Narrowing down your search - Contacting potential Ph.D. mentors - Drafting personal statements - Seeking letters of recommendation - Making your final decision (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

Course Descriptions – Software Engineering

SE 300 Software Requirements and Testing

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Corequisite, SE 310. Students are introduced to the tools and techniques used to elicit, capture, and test software requirements from the perspective of delivering a working software system. In addition to covering standard terminology for software requirements specifications, this course gives an in-depth treatment of formal testing techniques used to ensure software quality and requirement satisfaction. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SE 310 Software Design

Prerequisite, CPSC 231. Corequisite, SE 300. Students gain hands-on experience designing software from a formal set of functional and non-functional software requirements. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SE 320 The Software Development Lifecycle

Prerequisites, CPSC 350, SE 300, 310. Students apply their theoretical knowledge of the software development lifecycle to a year-long project spanning all facets of the requirements, design, implementation, test, and maintenance processes. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

SE 329 Experimental Course

Software engineering experimental courses are designed to offer additional opportunities to explore areas and subjects of special interest. Course titles, prerequisites, and credits may vary. Some courses require student lab fees. Specific course details will be listed in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) ½–4 credits.

SE 330 Software Qualification and Delivery

Prerequisites, CPSC 350, SE 320. Students will be introduced to software project management concepts such as cost and schedule management, defect tracking, staff rotation, and supporting multiple software releases. This course focuses on the implementation and test of a large software system, culminating in formal acceptance testing and delivery to the customer. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SE 370 Topics in Software Engineering

Prerequisite, determined by topic being offered. Advanced topics in the theory and practice of the software development lifecycle. Topics may include open-source software development, automated software engineering, empirical software engineering, and case studies of specific code ecosystems. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SE 410 Software Process and Management

Prerequisite, SE 310. Students are exposed to key concepts in software project management such as technical performance metrics, cost estimation, schedule tracking, and tailoring formal software processes to fit individual project requirements. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SE 420 Formal Methods in Software Engineering

Prerequisite, SE 410. A survey in formal methods in software engineering, including topics such as verification techniques, software mining, and specification languages. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SE 480 Software Engineering Seminar

Prerequisite, SE 300. Students are exposed to the latest trends and techniques in software engineering through a weekly seminar series consisting of invited lectures from industry and academia. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

SE 498 Software Engineering Capstone Project

Prerequisite, SE 330. Students complete an in-depth, individual, software engineering project in conjunction with a faculty advisor and an industry partner. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.