School of Pharmacy

Ronald P. Jordan, R.Ph., FAPhA, Dean

Nancy Alvarez, Pharm.D., BCPS, FAPhA, Assistant Dean of Professional, External Relations, and Strategy

Lawrence Brown, Pharm.D., Ph.D., FAPhA, Associate Dean of Student Affairs

Rocke DeMark, Ed.D., Assistant Dean of Student and Academic Affairs

Keykavous Parang, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Studies and Global Affairs

Sean Nordt, M.D., Pharm.D., DABAT, FAACT, FAAEM, FACMT, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Chief Medical Officer

Siu Fun Wong, Pharm.D., FASHP, FCSHP, Associate Dean of Assessment and Scholarship

Jeff Goad, Pharm.D., FAPhA, FCPhA, FCSHP, Chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice

Reza Mehvar, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Professors: Brown, Goad, Mehvar, Nauli, Ostrom, Parang, Seoane-Vazquez, Wong;

Gavin Herbert Endowed Professor of Pharmacy: Nordt;

Professors of Pharmacy Practice: Besinque, Gutierrez;

Associate Professors: Elsaid, Kaur;

Research Associate Professor: Ahmed;

Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice: Lam;

Assistant Professors: Elshahawi, Fawaz, Kang, Liu, Montazeri, Munjy, Rahigi, Roosan, Sharma, Tiwari, Tomaszewski, Totonchy, Yamaki, Yang, Zhang;

Research Assistant Professor: Maslennikov;

Clinical Assistant Professors: Alvarez, Tsu Chen;

Assistant Professors of Pharmacy Practice: Bach, Bethishou, Fong, Gregorian, Kelly, Lewis, Nguyen, Won, Xavioer.

Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Doctor of Pharmacy

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

4 + 1 B.S./M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

The Chapman University School of Pharmacy's mission is to lead innovative and personalized education, conduct transformative research, deliver team-based patient-centered care, and provide service to improve health.

Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Chapman University School of Pharmacy (CUSP) offers a year–round Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Pharmaceutical Sciences for students interested in the diverse research areas of drug design and discovery, pharmaceutics, drug delivery, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics or structural biology. A minimum of 3–4 years of study will be required depending on prior academic experience.

Admission Requirements

  1. A master’s degree in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, biotechnology or related areas from a regionally accredited university or college or international university with a cumulative 3.000 GPA or higher.
  2. GRE (Graduate Record Examination) General Test scores for competitive applicants:
  3. Two letters of recommendation from a professor or employer who is familiar with your academic abilities.
  4. A copy of official transcripts from the bachelor and master’s degree–granting institution(s).
  5. Resume or curriculum vitae with relevant experience.
  6. A personal statement of approximately 1–2 pages, double–spaced, which includes your:

 Additional requirements for international applicants

  1. Transcripts – Applicants submitting transcripts from foreign universities must submit transcripts in the native language as well as an English translation.
  2. English Proficiency Exam – International applicants whose native language is not English must submit results of the CAE, TOEFL, IELTS, or PTEA. CAE minimum score = 180. TOEFL minimum score = 550 (paper–based) or 80 (internet–based). IELTS score = 6.5. PTEA score = 53. International applicants who hold a bachelor's degree or higher from a university in the United States or in another country where English is the primary language are not required to take the CAE, TOEFL, IELTS or PTEA examination.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree

Students pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree are held to the University’s Academic Policies and Procedures. In addition these specific degree standards apply:

The following courses make up the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences curriculum:

core courses (24 credits)*

PHS 601

Ethics, Regulation, and the Pharmaceutical Pipeline

2

PHS 602

Drug Discovery and Development

3

PHS 611

Pharmacokinetics

3

PHS 612

Advanced Principles of Drug Action

4

CS 621

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I

3

PHS 623

Pharmaceutical Analysis

3

CS 624

Biostatistics

3

PHS 792

Research Rotations

3

seminar course (6 credits)

PHS 793

Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences

6

electives (minimum 10 credits)

PHS 614

Biologics

2

PHS 615

Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacogenetics

2

CS 622

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology II

3

PHS 621

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Processes

3

PHS 622

Formulation and Manufacturing Laboratory

2

PHS 631

Medical Diagnostics

3

PHS 632

Medical Devices

3

PHS 651

Quality System for Development and Manufacturing Drugs

3

PHS 660

Biopharmaceutical Regulation, Economics and Policy

3

PHS 661

Biomedical Market Access, Pricing and Reimbursement

3

PHS 662

Economic Evaluation of Health Care Services and Products

3

PHS 731

Advanced Pharmacokinetics

3

PHS 732

Advanced Pharmaceutics

3

PHS 733

Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Antibiotics

2

PHS 734

Proteomics

3

PHS 736

Advanced Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Agents

2

PHS 741

Structural Biology

3

PHS 742

Immunology and Microbiology

3

PHS 790

Summer Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences

3

research and dissertation (≥24 credits)

PHS 791

Research in the Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

≥12

PHS 798

Dissertation

12

total credits

 

≥64

*Chapman M.S.P.S. and Pharm.D. graduates are credited for 20 core and/or elective lecture course credits. M.S. graduates from other institutions are credited up to 12 credits towards the core and/or elective lecture courses, based on the relevance of prior course work as determined by the department.

Doctor of Pharmacy

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree is a three–year, accelerated professional degree composed of eight, 15–week trimesters where students will begin in the fall of each year. Personalized education and team-based care are core values for Chapman University, therefore, for many pharmacy courses students will be broken up into smaller groups of 6 or 7.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission, the applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be able to complete all 62 semester credits of prerequisite courses by the end of the Spring semester before pharmacy school starts. (Typically all prerequisite courses must have been taken within 7 years of applying to CUSP. Contact pharmacyadmissions@chapman.edu to request a waiver of the 7 year policy.)
  2. Letter grade of "C" or higher for all prerequisite courses.
  3. Two letters of recommendation – one must be from a math or science professor.
  4. Personal statement/essay.
  5. List of employment and extracurricular activities.
  6. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 and prerequisite GPA of 3.0 is preferred. (Lower GPA’s may be considered if student excels in other areas.)
  7. A PCAT composite score of 50th percentile or higher is preferred. (Lower composite PCAT score may be considered if student excels in other area.) Note: PCAT score must be from a test taken during the prior two years before January 30th of the year school starts.
  8. Meet and comply with the School of Pharmacy Technical Standards. Information on these standards and requirements, as well as such information as program costs, financial aid and acceptance and matriculation rates may be found on the department’s website at www.chapman.edu/pharmacy.

Selection Criteria for Admission

Chapman University School of Pharmacy (CUSP) utilizes a holistic approach, both for invitations to interview as well as admission decisions. We take into consideration various combinations of a student’s GPA’s, PCAT scores, student’s work history, extracurricular/leadership activities, communication and teamwork skills, and additional factors.

Prerequisite Courses (62 credits)

Course

Required Semester Credit Hours

Biology (General Biology w/ Lab) [*]

4

Human Anatomy w/Lab

4

Physiology w/Lab [*]

4

Microbiology

3

Chemistry (General w/ Labs)

8

Organic Chemistry w/ Labs

8

Physics w/Lab

4

Intro to Genetics or Molecular Biology

3

Calculus [#]

3

Statistics [@]

3

Psychology or Sociology [@]

3

Economics (Micro or Macro)

3

Communications/Speech

3

English Composition [*]

3

Electives

6

Total

62

[*] May be waived with a 5.0 on the AP exam.

[#] May be waived with a score of "4 or higher" on Calculus AB, or with a score of "3" or higher" on Calculus BC.

[@] May be waived with a score of "4 or higher" on the AP exam.

Additional information

Exceptions

Applicants who have prerequisite courses that are over 7 years old may seek an exception. A written request stating the extenuating circumstances supporting the exception should be submitted with the application or within ten days of notification that the requirements are not met. Students who feel they were denied admission due to an error or feel they were treated arbitrarily or capriciously should appeal to the pharmacy school Dean.

How and when to apply

Applicants must apply through the PharmCAS website at www.pharmcas.org. The applicant will be evaluated only when ALL application materials have been received and verified. 

  1. Submit your Chapman University School of Pharmacy Application for Admission through the PharmCAS website at: http://pharmcas.org
  2. To complete your Application for Admission, you must provide these required materials:

Application Deadlines

Early Decision Deadline is September 4th

Regular Deadline is March 1st

Requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree

Students pursuing the Doctor of Pharmacy degree are held to the University’s Academic Policies and Procedures. In addition these specific degree standards apply:

The following courses make up the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum:

requirements

PHRM 501

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)–I

1

PHRM 502

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)–II

1

PHRM 503

IPPE III Either Health System or Community

3

PHRM 504

IPPE IV Either Health System or Community

3

PHRM 511

Self-Care and Health Assessment I

3

PHRM 512

Self-Care and Health Assessment II

3

PHRM 521

Pharmacy-based Immunization Delivery

1

PHRM 524

Professional Development

1

PHRM 526L

Pharmacist Care Laboratory

1

PHRM 531

Integrated Therapeutics: Psychiatry/Neurology

5

PHRM 535

Dermatologic and Rheumatologic Disorders

2

PHRM 537

Integrated Therapeutics: Cardiology

5

PHRM 540

Integrated Therapeutics: Nephrology/Fluid and Electrolytes/Nutrition

3

PHRM 543

Integrated Therapeutics: Endocrinology

4

PHRM 546

Integrated Therapeutics: Gastroenterology

4

PHRM 549

Integrated Therapeutics: Pulmonology

2

PHRM 552

Integrated Therapeutics: Infectious Diseases I

3

PHRM 555

Integrated Therapeutics: Infectious Diseases II

4

PHRM 561

Integrated Therapeutics: Oncology

4

PHRM 571

Introduction to Health Care

3

PHRM 574  

Health Belief Models and Motivational Interviewing

1

PHRM 577

Health Care Delivery I

2

PHRM 578  

Health Care Delivery II

2

PHRM 579  

Health Care Delivery III

2

PHRM 581

Health Care Communication 

2

PHRM 584

Clinical Pharmacy Review

2

PHRM 591

Pharmacy Law and Ethics

2

PHRM 592

Health Law and Ethics

1

PHRM 601

Principles of Drug Action

4

PHRM 611

Macromolecules in Life

3

PHRM 621

Drug Delivery Systems I

2

PHRM 621L

Drug Delivery Systems I Lab

1

PHRM 622

Drug Delivery Systems II

2

PHRM 622L

Drug Delivery Systems II Lab

1

PHRM 631

Basic Pharmacokinetics

3

PHRM 632

Applied Pharmacokinetics

1

PHRM 641

Immunologic Basis of Diseases and Drug Action

2

PHRM 642

Biopharmaceuticals

2

PHRM 651

Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine

2

PHRM 671

Drug Information and Informatics

2

PHRM 672

Research Design, Statistics and Literature Evaluation

2

PHRM 681

Pharmacy Practice Management

3

PHRM 691

Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmacoepidemiology

2

PHRM 701

Internal Medicine APPE

6

PHRM 702

Ambulatory Care APPE

6

PHRM 703

Hospital Pharmacy APPE

6

PHRM 704

Community Pharmacy APPE

6

PHRM 705

Elective APPE I

6

PHRM 706

Elective APPE II

6

 

Electives (including the Capstone Project)

4

total credits

 

142

Accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy/Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences Pathway

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students interested in the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree are encouraged to pursue this option as early as possible, preferably by the end of the first year in Pharm.D. program. The coursework taken during the Pharm.D. program can be adjusted toward future requirements of the Ph.D. program. Pharm.D./Ph.D. students are required to complete their Capstone projects and perform at least one of the elective APPE rotations in research labs. The graduates from Chapman University School of Pharmacy Pharm.D. program can be credited for up to 20 core and/or elective course credits towards the core and/or elective lecture courses in the Ph.D. program. It is expected that Chapman Pharm.D. graduates will complete all the requirements of the Ph.D. program in 3 years.

Admission and course requirements for the Ph.D. program are listed under the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

This two–year, year-round thesis or non-thesis program is open to students with a bachelor’s degree with background in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, biotechnology or related areas. The M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences program of study is developed individually in consultation with the student's mentor and is designed to ensure expertise in the student’s principal field. This will present the student with the opportunity, under the supervision of a faculty advisor, to tailor his or her academic program towards a chosen career path.

Admission requirements

  1. A bachelor’s degree in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, biotechnology or related areas from a regionally accredited university or college or international university with a cumulative 3.000 GPA or higher. The program will also admit students with bachelor of science degrees in other fields. However, this will require students to take prerequisite courses in the following areas: biology and lab, microbiology, chemistry and lab, biochemistry, introduction to genetics, calculus, and physiology and lab.
  2. Two letters of recommendations from a professor or employer who is familiar with your academic abilities.
  3. Resume or curriculum vitae with relevant experience.
  4. A copy of official transcript from the bachelor’s degree granting institution.
  5. A personal statement of approximately 500–1,000 words, which includes your:

Additional requirements for international applicants

  1. Transcripts – Applicants submitting transcripts from foreign universities must submit transcripts in the native language as well as an English translation.
  2. English Proficiency Exam – International applicants whose native language is not English must submit results of the CAE, TOEFL, IELTS, or PTEA. CAE minimum score = 180. TOEFL minimum score = 550 (paper–based) or 80 (internet–based). IELTS score = 6.5. PTEA score = 53. International applicants who hold a bachelor's degree or higher from a university in the United States or in another country where English is the primary language are not required to take the CAE, TOEFL, IELTS or PTEA examination.

Requirements for Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree

Students pursuing the M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree are held to the University’s Academic Policies and Procedures. In addition these specific degree standards apply:

The following courses make up the M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree curriculum:

core courses (13 credits)

PHS 601

Ethics, Regulation, and the Pharmaceutical Pipeline

2

PHS 602

Drug Discovery and Development

3

PHS 623

Pharmaceutical Analysis

3

PHS 641

Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences I

1

PHS 642

Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences II

1

PHS 702

Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Methods

3

electives (minimum 11 credits)

from the courses listed below or those offered in the Pharm.D. program

PHS 611

Pharmacokinetics

3

PHS 612

Advanced Principles of Drug Action

4

PHS 614

Biologics

2

PHS 615

Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacogenetics

2

CS 621

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I

3

PHS 621

Introduction to Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Processes

3

PHS 622

Formulation and Manufacturing Laboratory

2

CS 624

Biostatistics

3

PHS 624

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Process II

2

PHS 624L

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Process Lab II

1

PHS 631

Medical Diagnostics

3

PHS 632

Medical Devices

3

PHS 651

Quality System for Development and Manufacturing Drugs

3

PHS 660

Biopharmaceutical Regulation, Economics and Policy

3

PHS 661

Biomedical Market Access, Pricing and Reimbursement

3

PHS 662

Economic Evaluation of Health Care Services and Products

3

PHS 690A

Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences I

3

PHS 690B

Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences II

3

PHS 736

Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Agents

2

PHS 741

Structural Biology

3

research (minimum 6 credits)

PHS 701

Research in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

6

thesis or non-thesis option (6 credits)

one of the following

PHS 697

Thesis

6

PHS 698

Capstone

6

total credits

 

36

Accelerated Master of Science/Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences Pathway

Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (MSPS) students interested in the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree are encouraged to pursue this option as early as possible, preferably by the end of the second trimester of MSPS program, as coursework taken during the MSPS program could be adjusted toward future requirements of Ph.D. program. The graduates from Chapman University School of Pharmacy MSPS program can be credited for up to 20 core and/or elective lecture course credits towards the core and/or elective lecture courses in the Ph.D. program. It is expected that Chapman MSPS graduates will complete all the requirements of the Ph.D. program in 3 years.

Admission and course requirements for the Ph.D. program are listed under the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Sciences.

4 + 1 B.S./M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

The 4 + 1 B.S./M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences is a program for undergraduates that enables students to begin taking M.S. coursework in their senior year and receive a Master of Science degree within one year of finishing their undergraduate degree. The B.S. degree is offered by the Schmid College of Science and Technology and the M.S. degree is offered by the School of Pharmacy at the Rinker Health Science Campus in Irvine. The program is open to all undergraduate Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Chemistry, and Biological Sciences majors who meet the admissions requirements. Graduates of the program can pursue a variety of career opportunities in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

Chapman students can apply to the M.S. program in their junior or senior year. Admission to the program is conditional pending the completion of the bachelor's degree. If accepted into a graduate program, undergraduate students may take up to 12 graduate credits once they have completed a minimum of 90 undergraduate credits have been completed or will be completed prior to start of the course in order to enroll in a graduate course. These 12 credits can be used to satisfy the undergraduate graduation requirements and count toward the M.S. program. Students would complete the remaining credit hours of graduate course work beginning in the summer after receiving the undergraduate degree.

Admission requirements

Information about admissions for the undergraduate B.S. in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Chemistry, and Biological Sciences can be found at: https://www.chapman.edu/admission/undergraduate/index.aspx.

Graduate admissions requirements:

  1. Graduate application available at https://www.chapman.edu/admission/graduate/applynow.aspx.
  2. Students with a cumulative 3.000 GPA or higher must apply the semester before the senior year of their bachelor’s degree (i.e. in the second semester of their junior year) in biochemistry and molecular biology.
  3. Two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with student’s academic abilities.
  4. A personal statement of approximately 500–1,000 words, which includes: a) student’s interest in the 4 + 1 program at Chapman; b) research goals; c) career goals; and d) academic and research achievements.
  5. Official transcript from baccalaureate program at Chapman.
  6. Resume or curriculum vitae.

Students will be admitted to the Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences on a conditional basis until they meet the following criteria:

  1. Completion of PHS 601, 602, 623 and 641 with a grade of C+ or higher.
  2. All B.S. in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Chemistry, and Biological Sciences degree requirements are met and the degree is bestowed by the university.
  3. Cumulative GPA at graduation is 3.000 or higher.

Requirements for Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree

Requirements for the master's program are listed under the Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Course Descriptions – Interprofessional Education

IPE 501 Healthcare Interprofessional Education - Fall

Prerequisite, athletic training, or communication sciences and disorders, or pharmacy, or physical therapy major, or physician assistant major. IPE 501 is one of a 5-part series of required university courses for health professional students to be offered in the Fall, trimester. This course series prepares students to practice health care services through a team approach. Working in small interprofessional teams through interactive collaborative activities, students will explore and become proficient in the 4 Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; Teams and Teamwork. This course is a graduation requirement for all health professional programs. The overall goal of this course series is to lay the foundation for student practitioners to optimize collaborative patient-centered care in the future. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 0 credit.

IPE 502 Healthcare Interprofessional Education - Spring

Prerequisite, athletic training, or communication sciences and disorders, or pharmacy, or physical therapy major, or physician assistant major. IPE 502 is one of a 5-part series of required university courses for health professional students to be offered in the spring trimester. This course series prepares students to practice health care services through a team approach. Working in small interprofessional teams through interactive collaborative activities, students will explore and become proficient in the four Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; Teams and Teamwork. This course is a graduation requirement for all health professional programs. The overall goal of this course series is to lay the foundation for student practitioners to optimize collaborative patient-centered care in the future. P/NP. (Offered spring semester.) 0 credit.

IPE 503 Healthcare Interprofessional Education - Summer

Prerequisite, athletic training, or communication sciences and disorders, or pharmacy, or physical therapy major, or physician assistant major. IPE 503 is one of a 5-part series of required university courses for health professional students to be offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer trimesters. This course series prepares students to practice health care services through a team approach. Working in small interprofessional teams through interactive collaborative activities, students will explore and become proficient in the 4 Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; Teams and Teamwork. This course is a graduation requirement for all health professional programs. The overall goal of this course series is to lay the foundation for student practitioners to optimize collaborative patient-centered care in the future. P/NP. (Offered summer.) 0 credit.

IPE 504 Healthcare Interprofessional Education - Fall

Prerequisite, athletic training, or communication sciences and disorders, or pharmacy, or physical therapy major, physician assistant major. IPE 504 is one of a 5-part series of university courses for health professional students to be offered in the Fall, trimester. This course series prepares students to practice health care services through a team approach. Working in small interprofessional teams through interactive collaborative activities, students will explore and become proficient in the 4 Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; Teams and Teamwork. This course is a graduation requirement for all health professional programs. The overall goal of this course series is to lay the foundation for student practitioners to optimize collaborative patient-centered care in the future. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 0 credit.

IPE 505 Healthcare Interprofessional Education - Spring

Prerequisite, athletic training, or communication sciences and disorders, or pharmacy, or physical therapy, or physician assistant major. IPE 505 is one of a 5-part series of university courses for health professional students. This course series prepares students to practice health care services through a team approach. Working in small interprofessional teams through interactive collaborative activities, students will explore and become proficient in the 4 Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency Domains: Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice; Roles/Responsibilities; Interprofessional Communication; Teams and Teamwork. This course is a graduation requirement for all health professional programs. The overall goal of this course series is to lay the foundation for student practitioners to optimize collaborative patient-centered care in the future. P/NP. (Offered spring trimester.) 0 credit.

Course Descriptions – Pharmaceutical Sciences

PHS 601 Ethics, Regulation, and the Pharmaceutical Pipeline

This course will focus on the ethics of conducting pharmaceutical and biomedical research and education, regulatory impact and implications of discovery, design, commercialization, and application of biopharmaceuticals. MSPS trainees will learn to identify and appropriately address ethical dilemmas and integrate these concepts into their research. MSPS trainees will be provided with the ethical values and principles in research such as responsible conduct of research, data management, authorship and peer review, collaborative work, scientific recordkeeping, intellectual property, and responsible use and welfare of animals and humans in biomedical experiments. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PHS 602 Drug Discovery and Development

This course provides an overview of the scientific and regulatory aspects of drug development from discovery to market. Topics covered include target identification, discovery and development of small and large molecules, preclinical studies, clinical trials, regulatory authorities and processes, and Good Manufacturing Practices. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

PHS 611 Pharmacokinetics

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course serves as an introduction to basic principles of pharmacokinetics, including compartmental and physiological analysis of the time courses of drug absorption, distribution, and elimination, with emphasis on the pharmacokinetic-based design of dosage regimen principles. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHS 612 Advanced Principles of Drug Action

This course provides a detailed overview of the principles of pharmacology, receptor signaling and medicinal chemistry. Details on how medicinal chemistry principles are used in the design and development of specific drug classes will be covered including natural product biosynthesis. Journal club discussions, assigned readings and peer presentations. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

PHS 613 Advanced Pharmacology

This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of the interactions between drugs and living systems. Drug mechanisms of action and drug interactions are emphasized. Principles of drug metabolism, synergism, antagonism, accumulation and toxicity are also discussed. Mechanism of action, adverse effects, and therapeutic applications of drugs affecting different systems are discussed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 614 Biologics

This required course includes clinical, pharmaceutical, and economic impact of biotechnology products in pharmacy, including monoclonal antibodies, interleukins, human growth factors, antigens, oligonucleotides, DNase, and interferons, and their sources, isolation, and design. Other topics include identification of organisms (viruses, bacteria, protozoan, helminth) which cause disease, the immune responses to infections/cancers, modern strategies utilized to produce vaccines and immunotherapeutics, community health issues related to successful delivery of the products to those in need, and specific infectious diseases and progress in developing vaccines and immunotherapeutics. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PHS 615 Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacogenetics

The course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the importance and application of patient-specific genetic information to individualization of pharmacotherapy. Content includes a review of essential principles of genetics, and the effect of genetic variation on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response of various medications. The ethical and legal implications that arise due to genetic testing will also be discussed. The mechanisms whereby pharmaceuticals alter gene expression will also be examined. Finally, the principles of gene therapy and protein pharmaceuticals will be presented. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PHS 617 Introduction to Health Care

This course provides an introduction to various health professions and the health care system overall. Individual professions will have recitations as part of the course that also explore in detail their particular discipline’s role. Students will present and discuss their profession’s role in specific situations in the larger, active learning settings. Course content centers on health delivery models, health care financing, health care insurance, health policy, the environment in which health care is rendered, and interprofessional care teams. The quality of care delivered is a particular area of interest within the course in hopes that students understand pharmacists’ role in preventing error or poor quality and contribute to the construction goal of flawless patient care. This course also includes an introduction to the importance of professionalism, a focus on health care disparities and health literacy, the medication use system, the roles and interactions that pharmacists encounter in various practice settings, and current and seminal articles. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 618 Research Design, Statistics and Literature Evaluation

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the principles of research design and literature evaluation using the concepts of evidence-based practice. The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of advanced statistical and study design principals useful in critically evaluating the pharmacy and medical literature. In this course, students will be provided with the introductory skills needed to make clinical decisions, focusing on how to formulate clinical questions, identify and execute appropriate search strategies, appraise the literature found, and apply the data to clinical decision making. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 619 Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmacoepidemiology

This course will provide the student with a basic understanding of pharmacoeconomics, including the clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes of medications, health services, and health interventions. It will also include content related to the area of epidemiology and how knowing the epidemiology of diseases differs based on race, gender, and geography. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 621 Introduction to Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Processes

This course explores: (a) Regulation of drug products and biopharmaceutics, application of kinetics to stability, dissolution, absorption, and other biopharmaecutical processes, and bioavailability and generic equivalence; (b) Solid and solution dosage forms and pharmaceutical calculations. Physicochemical properties of drug molecules and their effect on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of solid and solution products will be emphasized. Additionally, pharmaceutical calculations and pharmacy compounding techniques will be introduced. Other topics include particle engineering, wet granulation, high shear granulation, fluidized bed technology, direct compression, spray drying, freeze drying, melt extrusion, disperse systems, sterilization, pharmaceutical test methods including different dissolution test methods, HPLC and other commonly used test methods, process validation and quality control. Students will not only learn state-of-the-art pharmaceutical processing technologies and underlying chemical engineering principles, but also be exposed to current challenges in the pharmaceutical manufacturing field and possible solutions. The course will prepare students for pharmaceutical manufacturing and R&D jobs. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 622 Formulation and Manufacturing Laboratory

This course focuses on the practical aspects of formulation and manufacturing of various drug products such as tablets, capsules, solutions, parenterals, suspensions, emulsions, creams, ointments, gels and suppositories. This course also explores disperse system, sterile, and specialty dosage forms. Other topics include physicochemical properties of drug molecules and their effect on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of dosage forms; pharmaceutical calculations related to sterile preparations and specialty dosage forms; the governing regulations of USP 797; and sterile techniques, safe handling, labeling and disposal of bio hazardous materials. (Offered fall semester.) 2 credits.

PHS 623 Pharmaceutical Analysis

A required course with didactic and laboratory components focusing on the theory and practical application of chemical and analytical techniques in drug discovery and design. Students will receive hands on experience with techniques such as NMR, HPLC, LC/MS, solid-phase synthesis, combinatorial chemistry and biotransformation. (Offered spring semester.) 4 credits.

PHS 624 Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Process II

Prerequisite, PHS 621. This course explores Disperse Systems, Sterile pharmaceutical products, and Specialty Dosage Forms, as well as the effect of physicochemical properties of drug molecules on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of these pharmaceutical dosage forms. Specific topics covered include pharmaceutical calculations related to sterile preparations and specialty dosage forms; sterile techniques, safe handling, labeling and disposal of bio hazardous materials; stability of pharmaceutical products and the kinetic of the chemical processes involved; Biopharmaceutics, bioequivalency, and simulations; drug, protein, and nucleic acid delivery; and principals of manufacturing and quality control of sterile products, tablets, transdermal systems, aerosols, and controlled release dosage forms. This course may be taken without PHS 624L (laboratory component). (Offered spring semester.) 2 credits.

PHS 624L Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Process Lab II

Prerequisite, PHS 621. Corequisite, PHS 624. This course is the laboratory component for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Processes II (PH 624). Students experience compounding sterile products, and Specialty Dosage Forms. Sterile techniques, safe handling, labeling and disposal of bio-hazardous materials, as well as quality control procedures are practiced. Students must enroll in PHS 624 (lecture) while enrolled in this course. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

PHS 631 Medical Diagnostics

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about biomarkers for human diseases (discovery and validation) based on identification and quantification of small molecules, proteins, and oligonucleotides. Additionally, detection methods, instrumentation for diagnostic assays, immunoassays, flow cytometry, clinical chemistry, pharmacogenomics, and assay development will be discussed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 632 Medical Devices

This course will cover the fundamentals of the medical device design and product development, along with their regulation, standardization, approval and market clearance. The most commonly used medical devices will be analyzed, their internal structure dissected, and both standard and advanced methods for their manufacturing scrutinized. Digital healthcare devices, such as wireless medical technologies and wearables will be discussed as well as implants, prosthetics, intravenously injectable and cosmetic devices. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

PHS 641 Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences I

This weekly seminar will bring external experts to campus to educate trainees in different areas of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, such as biopharmaceutical research; pharmaceutical design, processing, and manufacturing; ethical issues related to drug development; and regulatory processes to ensure efficacy and safety. This course will be designed for MSPS trainees, but will be available to all Chapman graduate students with the appropriate interests and backgrounds. Trainees will select three presentations given throughout the semester and submit five-page papers that include a summary of the topic, the technical specifications and challenges, the opportunities for further development (e.g. commercialization), and the potential ethical and regulatory dilemmas addressed by or arising from the topic. Enrollment will be required each year for all MSPS trainees, but credit will only be given for their first time taking the course. PHS 641 and PHS 793 share class lectures and are held together. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PHS 642 Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences II

This weekly seminar will bring external experts to campus to educate trainees in different areas of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, such as biopharmaceutical research; pharmaceutical design, processing, and manufacturing; ethical issues related to drug development; and regulatory processes to ensure efficacy and safety. This course will be designed for MSPS trainees, but will be available to all Chapman graduate students with the appropriate interests and backgrounds. Trainees will select three presentations given throughout the semester and submit five-page papers that include a summary of the topic, the technical specifications and challenges, the opportunities for further development (e.g. commercialization), and the potential ethical and regulatory dilemmas addressed by or arising from the topic. Enrollment will be required each year for all MSPS trainees, but credit will only be given for their first time taking the course. PHS 642 and PHS 793 share class lectures and are held together. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PHS 651 Quality System For Development And Manufacturing Drugs

This course mainly discusses the laws that govern drug development and manufacturing. The laws are basically specified in rules and regulations of GMP and the USP. USP also provides detailed procedures for testing products to meet the minimum quality requirements. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 660 Biopharmaceutical Regulation, Economics and Policy

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with an overview of the regulatory, economic and policy issues of the biopharmaceutical and medical device markets. The course also describes the roles of the different agents participating in the biopharmaceutical and medical device markets. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 661 Biomedical Market Access, Pricing and Reimbursement

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with an overview of the economic, regulatory and policy issues of market access, pricing and reimbursement of biomedical technologies including pharmaceuticals, biologics and medical devices in the US and the global market. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 662 Economic Evaluation of Health Care Services and Products

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with a review of advanced quantitative analysis methodologies applied to economic evaluation and outcomes research. The course also explores current debates related to the evaluation of outcomes and cost, and the economic assessment of biomedical products. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 690A Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences I

This course will consist of a 10–week summer internship for each trainee to be conducted with one of the MSPS industry partners, international collaborators, or a research laboratory. Trainees will submit a report summarizing their experience, where/how they applied their training, and what regulatory and ethical issues they encountered and how they were addressed. They will also present their experiences with the MSPS community as part of an internship panel discussion. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

PHS 690B Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences II

This course will consist of a 10–week summer internship for each trainee to be conducted with one of the MSPS industry partners, international collaborators, or a research laboratory. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

PHS 697 Thesis

Writing, presenting, and defending the assigned research project. (Offered every semester.) 6 credits.

PHS 698 Capstone

MSPS students will work with an advisor, write, and presents about their research work. Trainees will submit a report summarizing their experience, where/how they applied their training, and what research, regulatory, or ethical issues they encountered and how they were addressed. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

PHS 701 Research in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Laboratory work and a detailed research as part of thesis research (minimum of 6 credits for degree requirement). P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–12 credits.

PHS 702 Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Methods

Students will learn different laboratory techniques used in pharmaceutical sciences in one or more faculty's laboratories in a rotation. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

PHS 731 Advanced Pharmacokinetics

Prerequisite, PHS 611. Advanced topics related to pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs and their metabolites with particular emphasis on modeling strategies appropriate for PK/PD research. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 732 Advanced Pharmaceutics

Prerequisite, pharmaceutical sciences major, Ph.D. program. This course will discuss advanced micro- and nano-carriers that have been used in targeted delivery of small molecules, proteins, and nucleic acids. With completing this course, students will learn about polymer science, supramolecular structures, including liposomes, nanocapsules, micelles, and drug-carrier conjugates. The concepts of passive and active targeting, as well as pharmacokinetic characteristics of these carries will also be discussed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 733 Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Antibiotics

Prerequisite, Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences major. This course will cover necessary properties and characteristics of antimicrobial agents, research techniques, and applications necessary for the screening and development of novel antimicrobial agents. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles of currently available antibiotics will be discussed. Use of PK/PD principles to optimize antimicrobial therapy and fight bacterial resistance will be reviewed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 734 Proteomics

This course will deal with the general principles, applications and current advances in the field of proteomics (protein expression profiling under normal and disease state). The students in this course will gain knowledge in the fundamental concepts in protein chemistry and hands-on experience in protein isolation, separation, and characterization including post-translational modification. This course will prepare students in project design, selection of various analytical tools; 2DE electrophoresis, differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE), N-terminal protein sequencing, mass spectrometry platforms (MALDI-TOF, ESI-TOF) and interpreting tandem mass spectrometry data. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 735 Selected Topics in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course covers advanced topics in pharmaceutical sciences that are not normally covered in other courses. The topics may be in the area of pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics/pharmacokinetics, pharmacognosy, drug delivery, drug metabolism, or nanomedicine. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–4 credits.

PHS 736 Pharmacology of Anti-Cancer Agents

This course provides a detailed overview of the pharmacology of conventional, targeted and immunoregulatory antineoplastic agents. Molecular mechanisms of action of the various drug classes along with established mechanisms of resistance will be discussed. The focus of learning is on the use of in-vitro and in-vivo models in antineoplastic drug discovery and in understanding the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxicity and resistance through journal club discussions, assigned readings and peer presentations. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PHS 741 Structural Biology

The course will provide students with the knowledge of NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography techniques, used to determine three-dimensional structures and describe dynamics and interactions of macromolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids. Using striking examples, the course will demonstrate the role of Structural Biology in our understanding of the basic relationships between structure, dynamics, and function of macromolecules. Specific examples will demonstrate applications of NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography in structure-based drug discovery and design. The students will become familiar with the application of Structural Biology methods to describe and quantify interactions between macromolecules and small molecules. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 742 Immunology and Microbiology

Prerequisite, pharmaceutical sciences major, Ph.D. program. This course will cover major concepts of cellular and molecular immunology and the microbiology of medically relevant organisms. A basic understanding of microbiology and immunology is required, as this course will further expand on basic microbiology and immunology concepts. Recent advancements, laboratory techniques, and clinical applicability will also be discussed. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 758 Advanced Cardiovascular Pharmacology

This elective course delivers an in-depth discussion on the pharmacological mechanics of cardiovascular system in artery, vein, heart and kidney. Cardiovascular disorders related to the circulatory system including the neuronal and hormonal regulations will be discussed as a platform to understand current and future molecular/cellular research in pharmacology. The course will also explore the limitations of our current pharmacological options in cardiovascular diseases, such as in polycystic kidney disease. To understand future pharmacological research and intervention, advanced topics in heart and vascular biology will be discussed based on the scientific theories, rationales, and hypotheses from the most recent research articles. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PHS 790 Summer Internship in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Prerequisite, pharmaceutical sciences major, Ph.D. program. This course will consist of a 10-week summer internship for each trainee to be conducted with one of the PhD industry partners, international collaborators, or a research laboratory. Trainees will submit a report summarizing their experience, where/how they applied their training, and what regulatory and ethical issues they encountered and how they were addressed. They will also present their experiences with the PhD community as part of an internship panel discussion. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

PHS 791 Research in the Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Prerequisite, pharmaceutical sciences major, Ph.D. program. Laboratory work and detailed research (minimum of 12 credits for degree requirement). P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–12 credits.

PHS 792 Research Rotations

Prerequisite, Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences major. A required course with didactic and some laboratory components focusing on the theory and practical application of chemical and analytical techniques in drug discovery and design. Ph.D. students will receive information and/or hands-on experience with techniques such as IR NMR, HPLC, LC/MS, UV-Vis, and imaging techniques. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

PHS 793 Seminar in Pharmaceutical Sciences

This weekly seminar will bring external experts to campus to educate trainees in different areas of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences, such as biopharmaceutical research; pharmaceutical design, processing, and manufacturing; ethical issues related to drug development; and regulatory processes to ensure efficacy and safety. This course will be designed for PhD trainees. Trainees will select three presentations given throughout the semester and submit five-page papers that include a summary of the topic, the technical specifications and challenges, the opportunities for further development (e.g. commercialization), and the potential ethical and regulatory dilemmas addressed by or arising from the topic. Enrollment will be required each year for all PhD trainees. PHS 793 shares class lectures with PHS 641 or 642 and are held together. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PHS 798 Dissertation

In this required course, the students will write, present, and defend an assigned research project. The topic of the dissertation should be assigned by the research advisor within the first two trimesters and as described in dissertation proposal. The students are required to complete this course within the final two trimesters. The dissertation states a research problem to be investigated and describes how the research will be performed in specific milestones and reported. The dissertation includes a critical review of the literature and results. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Pharmacy

PHRM 501 Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) - I

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a required course for all Chapman University School of Pharmacy student pharmacists. This is the first in a series of experiential education courses to provide for the review, synthesis, and application of what has been learned in the didactic portion of the curriculum during P1, Trimester 1. This course will expose student pharmacists to a variety of pharmacy practice experiences and personnel so that they can observe the delivery of healthcare and appreciate how personnel prepared for their positions. Student pharmacists will prepare an interview instrument to use to conduct comprehensive interview(s) with pharmacy personnel during their visits. Another component of experiential education will be comprised of a skills laboratory where student pharmacists will focus upon the development of basic skill techniques following short, contextual preparation on the topic. Structured practical experiences in a healthcare setting or community outreach program are designed to develop social responsibility and professional attitudes while providing student pharmacists with exposure to diverse patient populations and contemporary, local health care issues. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 502 Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) - II

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672. This is a required course for all Chapman University School of Pharmacy (CUSP) student pharmacists. This is the second in a series of experiential education courses to provide for the review, synthesis, and application of what has been learned in the CUSP didactic portion of the curriculum during P1, Trimester 2. This course will expose student pharmacists to a variety of pharmacy practice experiences and personnel so that they can observe the delivery of healthcare and appreciate how personnel prepared for their positions. Student pharmacists will prepare an interview instrument to use to conduct comprehensive interview(s) with pharmacy personnel during their visits. Another component of experiential education will be comprised of a skills laboratory where student pharmacists will focus upon the development of basic skill techniques following short, contextual preparation on the topic. Structured practical experiences in a healthcare setting or community outreach program are designed to develop social responsibility and professional attitudes while providing student pharmacists with exposure to diverse patient populations and contemporary, local health care issues. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 503 IPPE III Either Health System or Community

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651. This required course is the next in the series of experiential education courses to provide for the review, synthesis and application of what has been learned in the CUSP didactic portion of the curriculum to date. This introductory experience focuses upon on the role of the pharmacist/student pharmacist intern in a setting located in the local community - either a community pharmacy or a health-system (e.g., hospital) setting. The experience is designed to allow students to observe the delivery of care for patients in this setting and the management of the practice. These experiences intend to advance understanding of the role and responsibility of the pharmacist, contributors to the challenges to care delivery including care transition as patients move from home to a stay in an acute care facility and back; working with other healthcare professionals and gaining experience being accessible to a varied patient population(s) in the community. Students will gain experience determining resources available to support patient education and use of medications. This course will prepare students for advanced experiential coursework. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 504 IPPE IV Either Health System or Community

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 540, 543, 577, 642, 651. This is a required introductory experience focusing on the role of the pharmacist/student pharmacist intern in a setting located in the local community. The experience is designed to allow students to observe the delivery of care for patients in this setting and the management of the practice. These experiences intend to advance understanding of the role and responsibility of the pharmacist, challenges to care delivery and their various contributors; working with other healthcare professionals and to gain experience being accessible to a varied patient population in the community. Students will gain experience determining resources available to support patient education and use of medications. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 511 Self-Care and Health Assessment I

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course provides students with information about conditions that are self-treatable with nonprescription drugs and complementary and natural medicine; as well as how to assess patients to assist with product selection. Appropriate written documentation of findings and laws that govern nonprescription therapy will be introduced. The course will also examine the role of pharmacists in public health through pharmacy based health education, health promotion, and disease prevention. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 512 Self-Care and Health Assessment II

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is a continuation of the Self-care and Health Assessment I course with an emphasis on self-care and complementary and natural medicine therapeutics. This course also explores the implementation of pharmaceutical care programs in community pharmacy practice. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 521 Pharmacy-based Immunization Delivery

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is designed to train students to vaccinate (IM, SC, IN, ID), provide immunization advocacy and education using the APhA Pharmacy-Based Immunization Training Course, which includes live and homestudy instruction. In addition, students will learn injection techniques essential for administering drugs and biologics. Students will also complete a Basic Life Support certificate. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 524 Professional Development

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This course introduces and provides students with the programmatic requirements necessary to proceed with the core courses of the CUSP curriculum. The programmatic requirement topics will include Basic Life Support (BLS), Blood-Borne Pathogens (BBP), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), medical terminology, and the top 300 Drugs. Some of the programmatic requirements will result in receiving a certificate as proof of successful completion. An introduction to the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) will be covered in this course. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 526L Pharmacist Care Laboratory

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681. This practice-based lab course will provide the student with patient care based simulation activities to reinforce and practice the practice skills acquired in the T1-T5 courses and gain additional skills necessary to be a competent and practice-ready pharmacist. The class sessions will comprise of various topics including but not limited to health promotion, patient assessment and problem-solving, medication safety, professionalism, presentation skills, and physical skills assessments. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

PHRM 531 Integrated Therapeutics: Psychiatry/Neurology

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This course is designed to introduce students and provide them with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding of the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders. The topics of discussion will include the principles of biochemistry, anatomy, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical sciences, social/behavioral/administrative sciences and medication therapy management related to the prevention and treatment of psychiatric and neurologic disorders. (Offered every year.) 5 credits.

PHRM 534 Integrated Therapeutics: Dermatology/Otolaryngology

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This course introduces and provides students with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding of the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with dermatologic and otolaryngololgical disorders and conditions. The topics of discussion will include the principles of biochemistry, anatomy, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, clinical sciences, social/behavioral/administrative sciences and medication therapy management related to the prevention and treatment of dermatologic and otolaryngologic disorders and conditions. Dermatologic disorders/conditions will include benign and malignant skin lesions, viral, bacterial and systemic causes. A review is also given to burn therapy and wound management. Otolaryngological disorders affecting the ears, nose and sinuses will be covered in this course. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 535 Dermatologic and Rheumatologic Disorders

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641. This course provides students with an integrated approach to understanding the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with dermatologic, rheumatologic and arthritic disorders. The topics of discussion will include biochemistry, anatomy, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, medication therapy management, and clinical sciences related to the presentation and management of dermatologic and rheumatologic disorders. The goal of this course is to enable students to integrate their knowledge of these conditions in the context of formulating an individualized pharmacotherapeutic plan and monitoring/management strategies for a given patient. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

PHRM 537 Integrated Therapeutics: Cardiology

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. Cardiovascular disease is now the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. This required course is designed to develop the student’s ability to apply pharmaceutical principles and concepts to patient therapeutic needs in the area of cardiovascular disease. The course will take an interdisciplinary, integrated approach to cardiovascular disease and will include anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, medication therapy management, clinical science and management principles in the area of cardiology. Major areas of emphasis will include but are not limited to hypertension, thromboembolism related diseases, dyslipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS). Continued skill development of the clinical assessments associated with multiple disease states and medications will be emphasized. (Offered every year.) 5 credits.

PHRM 540 Integrated Therapeutics: Nephrology/Fluid and Electrolytes/Nutrition

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672. This course exposes students to an in depth discussion and understanding of several aspects of kidney function such as the physiological control of glomerular filtration and glomerular function in renal disease; regulation of renal electrolyte excretion and balance, and renal mechanisms of acid base balance. Nutritional deficiencies will also be discussed as well as therapies and strategies for nutritional replenishment. Renal physiologic responses and nutritional requirements in pregnancy and special populations are also covered. This course provides students with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding of the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with renal disease, as well as nutritional, fluid, and electolyte deficiencies and imbalances. The topics of discussion will include the principles of biochemistry, anatomy, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), clinical sciences and social/behavioral/administrative sciences related to the prevention and management of renal disease. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 543 Integrated Therapeutics: Endocrinology

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is an introduction to patient care concepts, patient assessment, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, therapeutics, and therapeutic drug monitoring for patients with endocrine disorders. The learning activities include gathering and processing information, identifying and prioritizing problems, planning and composing therapeutic interventions, managing medication treatments, patient communication and counseling. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

PHRM 546 Integrated Therapeutics: Gastroenterology

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651, doctor of pharmacy major. This course provides students with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding of the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases. The topics of discussion will include the principles of biochemistry, anatomy, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, clinical sciences, social/behavioral/administrative sciences and medication therapy management related to the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal/hepatic diseases. Gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases and conditions will include and are not limited to nausea and vomiting, constipation, irritable bowel disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, pancreatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatic encephalopathy. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

PHRM 549 Integrated Therapeutics: Pulmonology

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651, doctor of pharmacy major. This course is designed to introduce students to the management of diseases of the respiratory system. The course utilizes an integrated and interdisciplinary approach to apply the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, immunology, clinical sciences, and social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences for the prevention and therapeutic management of pulmonary disorders such as asthma, COPD, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and lung transplantation. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 552 Integrated Therapeutics: Infectious Diseases I

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651, doctor of pharmacy major. Infectious diseases are a leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Pharmacists play vital roles in the optimization and appropriate use of antimicrobial agents within the healthcare setting. This course provides students with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding various bacterial disease processes and therapeutic management of patients with bacterial diseases. The topics of discussion will include the principles of medical microbiology, biochemistry, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, medication therapy management, and clinical sciences related to the presentation and management of bacterial infections. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 555 Integrated Therapeutics: Infectious Diseases II

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a continuation of the Infectious Disease I course. This course provides students with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding various viral, fungal, and parasitic disease processes and the therapeutic management of patients with such diseases. The topics of discussion will include virology, mycology, parasitology, biochemistry, immunology, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, medication therapy management, and clinical sciences related to the presentation and management of bacterial infections. Upon completion of this course students will be able to formulate treatment, monitoring plans, and counseling on disease and drugs discussed. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

PHRM 558 Integrated Therapeutics: Rheumatologic Disorders

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. Rheumatic diseases have been estimated to affect over 20 percent of the United States population and are a significant cause of morbidity. This course provides learners with an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to understanding of the disease process and therapeutic management of patients with rheumatic disorders as well as certain autoimmune diseases. The topics of discussion will include immunology, anatomy, pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, clinical pharmacokinetics, social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, medication therapy management, and clinical sciences related to the presentation and management of joint and select autoimmune diseases. The goal of this course is to enable students to integrate their knowledge of these conditions in the context of formulating an individualized pharmacotherapeutic plan and monitoring/management strategies for a given patient. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 561 Integrated Therapeutics: Oncology

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. Cancer is the second cause of death in the United States. Pharmacists play a very significant role in caring of cancer patients, particularly in the areas of support care to lessen patients’ pain and suffering while they are going through their treatments as well as the end-of-life stage. This course utilizes integrated, interdisciplinary approach to apply the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, immunology, toxicology, clinical sciences, and social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences for the prevention and therapeutic management of the common hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, and hematologic disorders, with emphasis in supportive care. The hope is to empower the student pharmacists with self-learning attitudes and critical thinking skills to use for the rest of their professional lives. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

PHRM 571 Introduction to Health Care

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course provides an introduction to various health professions and the health care system overall. Individual professions will have recitations as part of the course that also explore in detail their particular discipline’s role. Students will present and discuss their profession’s role in specific situations in the larger, active learning settings. Course content centers on health delivery models, health care financing, health care insurance, health policy, the environment in which health care is rendered, and interprofessional care teams. The quality of care delivered is a particular area of interest within the course in hopes that students focus on their role in preventing error or poor quality and contribute to the construction goal of flawless patient care. This course also includes an introduction to the importance of professionalism, a focus on health care disparities and health literacy, the medication use system, the roles and interactions that pharmacists encounter in various practice settings, and current and seminal articles. Students learn about various career opportunities and will self-assess their potential interest using the APhA Career Pathways Program. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 574 Health Belief Models and Motivational Interviewing

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course provides students with a broad understanding of health belief models, their applicability to patient care, and how they affect patient behavior. Students will explore applicable areas of health belief model research, in addition to various health belief model instruments. As part of the course, students will work in teams to administer a health belief model survey to a small patient population and analyze the results. Students will also learn the techniques and language of motivational interviewing for the purpose of helping patients make health behavior changes to improve their health. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

PHRM 577 Health Care Delivery I

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672, doctor of pharmacy major. This course introduces students to the principles of interprofessional collaboration within the context of addressing health-related issues facing unique populations in a health care system. Students will be introduced to an integrated, interdisciplinary approach that will expose them to different types of management and treatment strategies for patients with multiple diseases in an acute care setting. This course represents an organized, coordinated and collaborative care network that links various healthcare providers to deliver a coordinated, vertical continuum of services to patients in an acute care setting. Course content will also discuss about the unique and inter-related aspects of health care provider roles and issues of health care delivery in this setting. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 578 Health Care Delivery II

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651, doctor of pharmacy major. This course introduces students to the principles of interprofessional collaboration within the context of addressing health-related issues facing unique populations in a health care system. Students will be introduced to an integrated, interdisciplinary approach that will expose them to different types of management and treatment strategies for patients with multiple diseases in an ambulatory care setting. This course represents an organized, coordinated and collaborative care network that links various healthcare providers to deliver a coordinated, vertical continuum of services to patients in an ambulatory care setting. Course content will also discuss about the unique and inter-related aspects of health care provider roles and issues of health care delivery in this setting. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 579 Health Care Delivery III

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. This course introduces students to the principles of interprofessional collaboration within the context of addressing health-related issues facing unique populations in a health care system. Students will be introduced to an integrated, interdisciplinary approach that will expose them to different types of management and treatment strategies for patients with multiple diseases in a transitional care, long term care, or skilled nursing facility setting. This course represents an organized, coordinated and collaborative care network that links various healthcare providers to deliver a coordinated, vertical continuum of services to patients in a transitional care, long term care, or skilled nursing facility setting. Course content will also discuss about the unique and inter-related aspects of health care provider roles and issues of health care delivery in this setting. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 581 Health Care Communication

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course focuses on communication principles and techniques with application to professional practice environments and clinical counseling situations. The course brings together various health professionals to facilitate better understanding of individual communication needs and skills to promote more effective inter-professional and professional-patient communication. The course's aim is to better enable professionals to educate the public and health care industry about relevant health information, and to improve relationships between patients and health care providers. The course will also address the importance of effective emergency and crisis communications. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 584 Clinical Pharmacy Review

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. This course will prepare students for their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience rotations. It will reinforce students’ critical thinking skills and application of clinical knowledge acquired from, but not limited to the integrated therapeutics courses. Class sessions will comprise of various topics for patient case discussions, and case-based small group exercises. The main topics will include patient workups, specific common diseases/conditions and treatments, evaluation of lab values, and pharmaceutical calculations. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 591 Pharmacy Law and Ethics

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course provides an overview of the numerous laws, both statutory and regulatory, which govern and control the practice of pharmacy. The course will explore the interprofessional perspectives on ethical dilemmas and the cultural implications in clinical care. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 592 Health Law and Ethics

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course provides an overview of the numerous laws, both statutory and regulatory, which govern and control the practice of health care delivery. It also includes information and discussion of the various ethical issues health professions face in various practice settings including manufacturing, distribution, and dispensing of drug products and the delivery of clinical pharmacy services. Additionally, this course will explore the interprofessional perspectives on ethical dilemmas and the cultural implications in clinical care. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 593 Health Law and Ethics - Team Case Work

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641. This is the recitation/case-based section for Health Law and Ethics and will explore the laws and regulations involved in manufacturing, distribution, and dispensing of drug products and the delivery of clinical pharmacy services. The course will cover the historical events that have shaped the present practice and delivery of pharmaceutical care. Discussions and team-based activities will include current topics in the ethical dilemmas and cultural implications often present in medication therapy management (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

PHRM 601 Principles of Drug Action

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This introductory course will facilitate understanding of fundamental concepts related to medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and toxicology with primary focus on drug design and mechanism of action of pharmacological agent. The goal is to provide a strong foundation for the application of drugs in the Integrated Therapeutics courses. Discussions will include the sources of drugs, tools for drug design approaches, and how the chemistry of a drug defines its pharmacokinetics and drug-receptor interactions. The students will become familiar with basic concepts in drug discovery, drug targets, drug-receptor interactions, enzymes, mechanism of drug absorption, methods in structure-activity relationships, combinatorial chemistry, and molecular modeling. Emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms by which drugs exert their actions and potential drug-drug interactions. (Offered every year.) 4 credits.

PHRM 611 Macromolecules in Life

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This course deals with the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids and their role in biological processes, including normal and abnormal cellular processes, membrane transport mechanisms, enzyme kinetics, and cell-to-cell communication and signaling. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 616 Concepts and Methods in Drug Metabolism

The overall goal of this course is to enhance the student’s understanding of drug metabolism by connecting pharmacokinetic parameters to biological processes. This involves learning theoretical concepts concerning enzymes kinetic, drug metabolism pathways, and how diseases and drugs interact with enzyme expression and function. These concepts will be connected to the practical considerations for investigators interested in studying changes in drug metabolism in vivo and in vitro. (Offered as needed.) 2 credits.

PHRM 621 Drug Delivery Systems I

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course introduces students to physicochemical properties of drug molecules and their effects on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of solid, liquid, and semisolid products. Specific topics covered are pharmaceutical calculations involved in pharmacy compounding and industrial manufacturing; regulations of drug manufacturing and products, as well as governing regulations of compounding in USP 795; principles of dissolution, absorption, and other biopharmaceutical processes; drug administration routes; and solid, liquid, and semi-solid dosage forms. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 621L Drug Delivery Systems I Lab

Prerequisite, doctor of pharmacy major. This course is the laboratory component for Drug Delivery Systems I. In this laboratory, students acquire hands-on experience with physicochemical properties of drug molecules and their effect on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of solid and liquid, and semisolid products. Pharmaceutical calculations and contemporary compounding and dispensing techniques are introduced and practiced. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 622 Drug Delivery Systems II

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. Corequisite, PHRM 622L. This required course explores: Disperse System, Sterile, and Specialty Dosage Forms. Physicochemical properties of drug molecules and their effect on formulation, manufacturing, and administration of Disperse System, Sterile and Specialty Dosage Forms; Pharmaceutical calculations related to sterile preparations and specialty dosage forms; and the governing regulations of USP 797. Sterile technique, safe handling, labeling and disposal of bio hazardous materials are covered. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 622L Drug Delivery Systems II Lab

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. Corequisite, PHRM 622. This course is the laboratory component for Drug Delivery Systems II. In this laboratory, students experience compounding disperse Systems, Sterile products, and Specialty Dosage Forms. Sterile techniques, safe handling, labeling and disposal of bio-hazardous materials, as well as quality control procedures are practiced. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 631 Basic Pharmacokinetics

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is an introduction to the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, including compartmental and physiological analysis of the time courses of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, with emphasis on the pharmacokinetic-based design of dosage regimen principles. Additionally, the relationship between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and its use for individualization of dosage regimens will be discussed. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 632 Applied Pharmacokinetics

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course consists of lectures, active learning, and recitations on the practical application of pharmacokinetic theory as it relates to the individualization of patient drug therapy, through the proper interpretation of drug serum concentrations. The course presents the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with specific emphasis on their application in pharmaceutical science. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 641 Immunologic Basis of Diseases and Drug Action

Prerequisites, PHRM 521, 581, 591, 601, 611, 621, 621L, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is an introduction to the immune response and the role of the immune system in inflammatory diseases, hypersensitivity, solid organ transplantation, cancer, and immunity to infection. The components of the human immune system; formation, structure, and action of antigens and antibodies; and the current preventive and therapeutic measures that exert their actions by interacting with the immune system will be discussed. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 642 Biopharmaceuticals

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course includes clinical, pharmaceutical, and economic impact of biotechnology products in pharmacy, including monoclonal antibodies, interleukins, human growth factors, antigens, oligonucleotides, DNase, and interferons, and their sources, isolation, and design. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 651 Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine

Prerequisites, PHRM 512, 534, 537, 632, 671, 672, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the importance and application of patient- specific genetic information to individualization of pharmacotherapy. Content includes a review of essential principles of genetics, and the effect of genetic variation on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics response of various medications. The ethical and legal implications that arise due to genetic testing will also be discussed. More advanced applications of pharmacogenomics will be covered in the therapeutics series. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 671 Drug Information and Informatics

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This course explores the fundamental aspects of drug information. Through a series of pre-class assignments and in-class lectures and exercises, this course will introduce students to basic drug information skills, evidence based medicine, and provide practical experience in retrieving medical literature and providing responses to drug information inquiries. Emphasis is placed on systematic search strategies, types of drug information available, the ability to formulate an effective response and recommendation by using a structured approach, and the delivery of information to other health care professionals. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 672 Research Design, Statistics and Literature Evaluation

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course consists of lectures, recitations, and laboratory sessions designed to teach pharmacy students how to use the available electronic and print resources to answer drug information questions. In addition, content includes the basics of experimental design, research methodology, and evaluation of the current drug literature. Emphasis is placed on search strategies and provision of drug and toxicology information to health care professionals. Students will explore study design and methodology of drug trials to interpret results in the care of patients. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 681 Pharmacy Practice Management

Prerequisites, PHRM 502, 540, 543, 574, 577, 642, 651, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course exposes students to the basic principles of management including planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling a practice, business, or organization. Additional focus is placed on management of capital, time, inventory, and human resources for traditional pharmacies as well as an MTM practice setting. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

PHRM 682 Student-Faculty Research

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

PHRM 691 Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmacoepidemiology

Prerequisites, PHRM 503, 546, 549, 552, 578, 681, doctor of pharmacy major. This required course will provide the student with a basic understanding of pharmacoeconomics, including the clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes of medications, health services, and health interventions. It will also include content related to the area of epidemiology and how knowing the epidemiology of diseases differs based on race, gender, and geography. (Offered every year.) 2 credits.

PHRM 701 Internal Medicine APPE

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience based in a hospital practice setting with an emphasis on the medical management of disease states in adult patients, rational medication therapy and patient monitoring. Internal medicine focus areas may include stroke, acute organ failure, acute/serious infections, trauma, clotting disorders, asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute coronary syndromes, hypertension, and diabetes. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care in this practice setting including but not limited to: rounding with a healthcare team; obtaining patient histories; applying disease state knowledge to evaluate therapeutic options for a given diagnosis/condition; recommending therapy monitoring strategies for desired outcomes and/or adverse effects; performing medication reconciliation activities for patients admitted or transferred; identifying problems requiring therapeutic interventions and solving them; considerations for appropriate use of antibiotics, nutritional support, acute pain management, intravenous hydration, anticoagulation and therapeutic drug monitoring for hospitalized patients; assessment of patient’s acid-base and renal function status, interpretation of laboratory values; and, responding to drug information questions posed by other healthcare professionals. The course content/experience will vary by site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacists’ previous experiences and/or highlight an educator’s area of expertise. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 702 Ambulatory Care APPE

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience where adult patients are seen in outpatient settings and care is delivered by a pharmacist. The settings may include hospital-based clinics, physician group practices, safety net clinics, and managed care facilities that provide healthcare directly to patients. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care in this practice setting including but not limited to: integrating health promotion and disease prevention measures into patient health care plans; effectively communicate with patients and other health care professionals to make interventions to improve care; respond to drug information questions posed by other healthcare professionals, provide education to patients encompassing disease states, therapies, and, required monitoring and follow-up care; applying disease state knowledge to evaluate therapeutic options for a given diagnosis/condition seen in an outpatient population; and administering immunizations and conducting health screening. Students will also learn about the management of the practice including billing and third party payer issues (formulary and prior authorization procedures) pertaining to pharmacy services and clinic workflow (i.e., roles and responsibilities of all personnel). The course content/experience will vary by site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacists’ previous experiences and/or highlight an educator’s area of expertise. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 703 Hospital Pharmacy APPE

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience based in a health-system (institutional) practice setting. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care in this practice setting including but not limited to: processing medication orders; preparation (sterile and non-sterile compounding, handling cytotoxic agents, repackaging bulk units into unit dose units, maintenance of crash carts) and provision of patient-specific medications and other products for administration to patients; medication reconciliation and discharge medication counseling and information hand-off to other healthcare professionals in other settings caring for the patient. Students will also learn about the management of the practice including operations and services relating to systems for drug distribution and drug control (i.e., billing, inventory management, delivery and floor stock procedures, managing controlled substances, formulary processes, etc.); and, the relationship of the department within the institution and health system. The course content/experience will vary by site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacists’ previous experiences and/or highlight an educator’s area of expertise. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 704 Community Pharmacy APPE

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience based in a community clinical pharmacy practice setting. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care in this practice setting including but not limited to: selecting over the counter medications and educating patients, managing medication therapy through prescription evaluation, problem resolution and patient education, demonstrating cultural competence to engage patients and caregivers, preparing and delivering prescription products, administering immunizations and conducting health screening. Students will also learn about the management of the practice including operations (inventory management, billing third parties), managing controlled substances; and recall procedures. The course content/experience will vary by site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacists’ previous experiences and/or highlight an educator’s area of expertise. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 705 Elective APPE I

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience (APPE) in an elective area of practice highly focused upon an experiential educator’s area of expertise. The student pharmacist will participate in the day-to-day activities of the experiential educator to explore the student pharmacist’s interest in the elective area. Further, this will allow the student pharmacist to develop an in-depth understanding of that area by engaging in activities that lend themselves to application of formed knowledge and skills and accomplishment of student learning outcomes. Elective experiences may include but are not limited to: specialty or focused internal medicine areas (i.e., infectious disease, cardiology, or endocrinology); pharmaceutical industry (i.e., drug development, medical communications, drug safety and pharmacovigilance, medical science liaison, regulatory affairs, clinical affairs, medical affairs); special population-focused (i.e., community pharmacy, specialty clinic, rehabilitation hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home-based consult services, assisted living facilities); state and national pharmacy organizations-based; academia; and research. The course content/experience will vary by experiential site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacist’s previous experiences and/or highlight an experiential educator’s area of expertise. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care or non-direct, patient care or other professional activities. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 706 Elective APPE II

Prerequisites, PHRM 555, 558, 561, 579, 584, 691, doctor of pharmacy major. This is a six-week advanced practice pharmacy experience (APPE) in an elective area of practice highly focused upon an experiential educator’s area of expertise. The student pharmacist will participate in the day-to-day activities of the experiential educator to explore the student pharmacist’s interest in the elective area. Further, this will allow the student pharmacist to develop an in-depth understanding of that area by engaging in activities that lend themselves to application of formed knowledge and skills and accomplishment of student learning outcomes. Elective experiences may include but are not limited to: specialty or focused internal medicine areas (i.e., infectious disease, cardiology, or endocrinology); pharmaceutical industry (i.e., drug development, medical communications, drug safety and pharmacovigilance, medical science liaison, regulatory affairs, clinical affairs, medical affairs); special population-focused (i.e., community pharmacy, specialty clinic, rehabilitation hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home-based consult services, assisted living facilities); state and national pharmacy organizations-based; academia; and research. The course content/experience will vary by experiential site and will be altered to accommodate a student pharmacist’s previous experiences and/or highlight an experiential educator’s area of expertise. Under the guidance of an experiential educator, student pharmacists will generally advance knowledge and skills applicable to providing direct patient-care or non-direct, patient care or other professional activities. (Offered every year.) 6 credits.

PHRM 711 The Capstone Project

This is an optional course for all student pharmacist graduates of the PharmD program at Chapman University School of Pharmacy. This is a longitudinal course that requires review, synthesis and application of what has been learned in the Chapman School of Pharmacy curriculum through P1 to P3. Student pharmacists will be guided to select a focused area of interest in pharmacy-related practice or research to advance knowledge and skills through elective courses and experiential experiences. Student pharmacists will prepare the research- or practice-related project for platform and/or poster presentation at the conclusion of trimester 8 as another component of the experiential education. The student pharmacist will work under the guidance of the project advisor with the support of the faculty advisors. Depending on the project selected by the student pharmacists, the project advisor may be a Chapman School of Pharmacy faculty, Chapman faculty, expert from an outside affiliated organization, or an experiential educator. The faculty and peers at Chapman University are the target audience. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) ½–1 credit.

PHRM 711A The Capstone Project

This is an optional course for all student pharmacist graduates of the PharmD program at Chapman University School of Pharmacy. This is a longitudinal course that requires review, synthesis and application of what has been learned in the Chapman School of Pharmacy curriculum through P1 to P3. Student pharmacists will be guided to select a focused area of interest in pharmacy-related practice or research to advance knowledge and skills through elective courses and experiential experiences. Student pharmacists will prepare the research- or practice-related project for platform and/or poster presentation at the conclusion of trimester 8 as another component of the experiential education. The student pharmacist will work under the guidance of the project advisor with the support of the faculty advisors. Depending on the project selected by the student pharmacists, the project advisor may be a Chapman School of Pharmacy faculty, Chapman faculty, expert from an outside affiliated organization, or an experiential educator. The faculty and peers at Chapman University are the target audience. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 0 credit.

PHRM 750 Pharmacy-Based Travel Health

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This application-based activity is the first step for pharmacists interested in learning the essential skills necessary to successfully provide travel health services. Numerical grading only. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 751 Holistic Remedies

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This elective aims to provide students an opportunity to learn about non-Western medicines and to take on a global perspective about holistic medicines. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

PHRM 752 Drug Abuse

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This elective course will cover substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders, including intoxication and withdrawal effects of commonly abused substances. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 753 Leadership and Management

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This course offers the opportunity to examine leadership behaviors and their application in any organization. P/NP. (Offered every trimester.) 1 credit.

PHRM 754 Ocular Diseases

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This elective course will cover the pathophysiology of infectious, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that affect the eye. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 755 Managed Care

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. As pharmacists focus their efforts on more patient-centered care opportunities and expand their scopes of practice, they must be aware of how the U.S. healthcare payment system operates. Without sound knowledge related to reimbursement models within both pharmaceutical benefits, as well as, health insurance programs, pharmacists will not be able to describe their added value to potential employers. This course aims to describe the general payment system, describe a variety of pharmacists’ roles in managed care organizations, and expose student pharmacists to professionals who are currently practicing in managed care organizations. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 756 Advanced Pediatrics

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. The overall goal of this one-credit elective course is to introduce the core concepts involved in the care of pediatric patients and to expand the student’s therapeutic knowledge regarding common pediatric disease states. The topics of discussion will include clinical pediatric pharmacokinetics & pharmacodynamics, pediatric dosing calculation, drug administration, and common drug-related problems in pediatric patients. Common diseases in pediatric patients will include neonatal therapy, congenital heart diseases, febrile seizure, pediatric critical care, and childhood poisoning. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 757 Global Health Missions

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This elective will take an evidence based and common sense based approach to providing missionary relief and medical/pharmaceutical care in the developing countries. As pharmacists, we have the ability to influence much more than just the dispensing of medications. We will discuss about building a high functioning missionary team, vaccination requirements, cultural and religious influences to medications, laws and customs requirements for shipping medications, storage requirements, product sourcing, formulary and protocol development, and follow-up documentation post-trip. Students will be required to pick a country of interest and present their formulary and protocol review to the class, along with any law requirements for that country. This elective aims to provide students an opportunity to learn how to serve the medical needs in non-western environments and to take on a global perspective about healthcare in areas of extreme poverty and with limited resources. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 758 Advanced Cardiovascular Pharmacology

Prerequisites, PHRM 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. Cardiovascular disease is a disorder of the circulatory system including the heart and blood vessels, which may ultimately affect functions of the lungs, brain, kidneys or other parts of the body. This elective course is intended to explore the limitations of our current understanding and pharmacological option. Advanced topics in heart and vascular pathology from the most recent scientific articles will be discussed. Although the mortality of heart disease and stroke has decreased, the burden of disease remains high. The 2016 Statistical Update, based on 2013 data, highlights the importance of continuous monitoring both cardiovascular health and disease in our population, including young adults. There is still 1 death in every 40 seconds attributable to cardiovascular diseases, and 32.6% of US adults still have hypertension. Our discussion-based activity will allow student pharmacists to understand the opportunity for future pharmacological options in the cardiovascular diseases. P/NP. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 759 Advanced Cardio-Metabolic Disease Management

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This elective course will expose students to disease state guidelines (hypertension, dyslipidemia, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes) and critically examine clinical trial evidence supporting evidence-based recommendations. Students will then be able to apply clinical trial data to specific patient cases. This course will also build upon students’ foundational therapeutic knowledge of cardio-metabolic disease states, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and diabetes. At completion of this course, students will be able to develop and communicate patient-specific pharmacotherapy plans utilizing evidence-based recommendations. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 760 Women’s Health Issues in Pharmacy Practice

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. The goal of this one-credit elective course is to introduce gender-related pharmacotherapy and describe the impact this has in health management across a woman’s lifespan. This course will focus on discussing safe and appropriate medication therapy use in conditions or diseases that disproportionately affect women compared to men. The course will prepare students to address relevant issues in women’s healthcare while considering social, religious, economic, and other barriers or challenges women face. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 761 Nuclear Pharmacy

Prerequisites, PHRM 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. The objective of this elective course is to offer an introduction to nuclear pharmacy, its scientific principles, scope of practice, and vital role in optimizing patients’ treatment outcome. Student will explore the operation aspects of nuclear pharmacy in comparison to other practice setting; learn about educational as well as training requirement to successfully perform the responsibilities of nuclear pharmacist. Further, student will learn about different regulatory agencies and their roles in daily as well as overall practice of nuclear pharmacy. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to various types of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals that are currently available to clinicians as part of routine medical care. This course will provide students an opportunity to evaluate each radiopharmaceutical in depth to learn about its indication, dosage, side effect, drug interactions and where there is potential for pharmacist intervention. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 762 Residency Preparation Elective

Prerequisites, PHRM 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. The overall goal of this one-credit elective course is to improve student professionalism, communication, and clinical skills to strengthen their candidacy for PGY1 residency programs. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 763 Selected Topics in Basic and Clinical Toxicology

Prerequisites, PHRM 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This course provides an overview of mechanistic toxicology and familiarizes students with principles of clinical toxicology and approaches to management of patients with acute overdoses and poisonings of select pharmaceuticals and toxins. In this course, we will discuss the most common cellular mechanisms of toxicity and provide a rationale for antidote selection. Recognition of toxidromes of commonly encountered overdoses and the development of patient-specific management plans, including antidote selection and supportive care measures, will be emphasized. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 764 Introduction to Management of Inpatient Medical Emergencies

Prerequisites, PHRM 511, 531, 537, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. This course provides pharmacy students with hands-on application of the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithms and clinical management of select medical emergencies through interprofessional simulated experiences with the physician assistant (PA) students. The clinical focus of each simulated interprofessional medical scenarios (SIMS) will concentrate on various reversible causes of cardiac arrest. Each week, students will review online videos/modules and/or pre-class assignments and complete an online quiz to prepare for the weekly in-class SIMS and debrief discussions. This course will emphasize applying clinical knowledge, preparing medications at bedside, calculating patient-specific doses, researching drug information, practicing evidence-based medicine and enhancing interprofessional team and communication skills. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.

PHRM 765 X-ray Crystallography in Drug Discovery

Prerequisites, PHRM 501, 511, 531, 592, 622, 622L, 631, 641, doctor of pharmacy major. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining protein structure and has been used in drug discovery since 1980s. It allows the detailed analysis of ligand (drug) binding to its target protein, resulting in the design of new medicines or improvement of the available drugs. This course offers an introduction to the x-ray crystallography technique, including growing protein crystals, determining crystal structure of proteins, and application of the information obtained from crystal structures in drug design and development. (Offered every year.) 1 credit.