» Inter/Multidisciplinary Cluster (Themed Inquiry) Programs (by Name)

You must declare your cluster officially through the University's Office of the Registrar. To do so, fill out the Themed Inquiry Form and turn it into the Registrar.

Click on the following to see your cluster (themed inquiry) choices. The information is in PDF format. Check the class schedule on my.chapman.edu to see which classes will be offered in the coming term. Prerequisites for courses in each cluster (themed inquiry) are indicated in brackets in the cluster (themed inquiry) course lists, but these are subject to change.


Toggle Section

19th Century Studies

Focus: Students choosing this cluster will explore the intersections between history, culture, and art as they developed throughout the 19th century. The Napoleonic wars, the American Civil war, slavery, the industrial revolution, colonialism and imperialism, Darwinism, as well as numerous scientific discoveries and innovations are reflected in and influenced by the art, literature, and culture of the period.

Cluster Coordinator/email: English Department Chair, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to History majors.
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.
 
AH 201: Renaissance to Modern Art
AH 330: Nineteenth Century Art
ENG 320: American Literature before 1870 [ENG 256]
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 190: East Asia History and Popular Culture
HIST 202: Modern World Civilizations
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
PHIL 311: Descartes to Kierkegaard (cross listed with REL 311)


The following courses must have the cluster coordinator's approval:

ENG 321: Topics in American Literature after 1870 
ENG 344: Topics in British Literature before 1850
ENG 345: Topics in British Literature after 1850

Africa and the Middle East

Focus: The goal of this cluster is to encourage students to appreciate the dynamic and rich history and cultural diversity of Africa and the Middle East. Cluster courses provide detailed accounts of life in particular communities in Africa and the Middle East; exploration of significant and timely sociopolitical issues in both regions; and examination of the processes that have led to the present conditions in African and Middle East societies.

Cluster Coordinator/Email: Chair, Department of Sociology, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be at the upper division level.

POSC 326: Politics in the Contemporary Middle East
POSC 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with PCST 352)
POSC 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross listed with PCST 353)
REL 202: Introduction to Islam

African Studies

Focus: This cluster allows students to explore the history, language, religion, and economics of the African experience in Africa and in the Diaspora.

Cluster Coordinator/Email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following courses, two of which must be upper division.

ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic
ECON 411: International Economics  [ECON 200, 201]
FREN 101: Elementary French I
FREN 102: Elementary French II [FREN 101]
FREN 201: Intermediate French I [FREN 102]
FREN 202: Intermediate French II [FREN 201]
FREN 348: Topics in Francophone Literature of the World [FREN 201]
HIST 160: African Voices: African History to 1800
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 317: Migrations in World History
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
POSC 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States
REL 202: Introduction to Islam

Africana Studies

Focus: The Africana Studies cluster examines the histories, cultures, societies, literatures, arts and languages of Africans, African Americans, and people of African descent, and their contributions to world civilization. The curriculum takes a transnational approach to the study of the Black experience and places it in a comparative context of Africa and the African Diaspora. The goal of the interdisciplinary curriculum is to provide a personalized education of distinction through a range of core and elective courses that allow students to determine areas of emphasis. With faculty advisement, students will select a tailored course of study that introduces them to the key themes, concepts, intellectual traditions, and political movements of Africana Studies, laying a strong foundation for practical application and social engagement through the critical interrogation of race, geography, and power.

Cluster Coordinator/Email: Dr. Quaylan Allen, Associate Professor, Attallah College of Educational Studies

Restrictions: Open to all majors

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

HIST 222: Apartheid and Resistance in South Africa 
HIST 320: History on Trial: African Struggles for Truth and Justice 
HIST 322: Global History of U.S. Civil Right Era and Decolonization 1940s-1980s 
HIST 324: African History through Film, Literature and Music
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction
HUM 205: Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies
IES 102: The Social Construction of Difference
LEAD 384: Ethnic Studies Activism: Theory and Practice
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study - travel course
PCST 354: Non-Violent Social Change
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with PCST 352)
POSC 362: Politics of Humanitarianism
REL 202: Introduction to Islam
SOC 225: Social Inequality/Stratification
SOC 306: Social Movements 
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity 
TH 150: Theatre in World Cultures

American History

Focus: This cluster gives students the chance to explore American history from expanded cultural and media perspectives.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.  

HIST 101: United States History Survey I
HIST 103: United States History Survey II
HIST 211: Mother Russia and Uncle Sam During the Cold War: Conflict and Coexistence
HIST 220: The Vietnam Wars
HIST 221: Native American History: The Struggle to be Heard
HIST 223: The Sixties
HIST 224: United States Women's History
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HIST 233: Disability and American Life
HIST 240: History of America through Sport
HIST 301: U.S. Environmental History
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: The Bonfires of Change
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction
HIST 333: Images of American History
HIST 336: Conflict and Change in America: 1920-1945
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 338: America After the War, 1945-1960
HIST 340: American Diplomatic History and Foreign Policy
HIST 342: The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life, and Death
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States
HIST 371: U.S. Business and Entrepreneurial History (cross listed with ECON 371)
HIST 372: California History
HIST 373: U.S. Economic History (cross listed with ECON 373)

American Society and Culture

Focus: The United States offers a fascinating case study of the triumphs and struggles of a nation building its own identity. Able to choose from cultural, political, economic and social models already in place throughout the world, Americans made crucial decisions regarding our values, goals, and character that continue to shape our identity today. This cluster will provide an opportunity for students to examine the myriad factors that shape the dynamic society and culture of the United States and to examine critically its role in the world today.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be at the upper division. Students take two courses from each of the two subdivisions.

Cultural Studies:

Historical Perspectives:

Animation and Visual Effects (formerly Digital Arts)

Focus: This cluster is designed to serve students who have an interest in the artistic and storytelling possibilities in animation, visual effects, gaming and VR/AR.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor Bill Kroyer, Director Animation and Visual Effects

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open only to Graphic Design majors and Art majors. Not recommended for transfer students, or for student who do not have a minimum of four semesters to complete it.

Contact the cluster coordinator upon enrollment in this cluster to ensure that you will be able to get into courses which are open to Animation and Visual Effects majors and Visual Effects minors only. The cluster coordinator can assist you with taking the courses in the appropriate sequence to meet prerequisites for upper division courses.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

CPSC 242: Introduction to the Game Industry
AVE 120: Introduction to Animation and Visual Effects [Animation and visual effects, or film production major, or game development programming, or production design for film, or visual effects minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 202: 3-D Computer Graphics I [AVE 120, and animation and visual effects major, or visual effects, or game development programming minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 206: Mechanics of Motion [AVE 109, and animation and visual effects major, or game development programming minor.]
AVE 242: 2D Computer Graphics [Animation and visual effects major, or game development programming minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 247: History and Aesthetics of Animation and Visual Effects [Dodge College major, or game development programming minor, or visual effects minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 249: Storytelling in Animation and Visual Effects [AVE 247, and animation and visual effects major, or game development programming minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 256: Beginning Character Animation [AVE 206, and animation and visual effects major, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 302: 3-D Computer Graphics II [AVE 202, 249, and animation and visual effects major, or game development programming minor, or animation and visual effects cluster.]
AVE 339: Digital Illustration [AVE 109, 120, 209, and animation and visual effects major.]
AVE 356: Intermediate Character Animation [AVE 249, 256, and animation and visual effects major.]
AVE 369: Visual Effects: Fundamental Techniques and Technologies [AVE 120, and Dodge College major or minor]
AVE 379: Advanced Visual Effects Production and Workflow [AVE 369]

Arabic Studies

Global View: The Arabic Studies Cluster is designed to advance Chapman's mission of providing students with a personalized education of distinction that leads to inquiring, ethical, and productive lives as global citizens.

The Arabic language represents the cultural context of a major world civilization with historical influence on a number of significant world languages and sciences while continuing to maintain contemporary interest.

Focus: The Arabic Cluster provides students the opportunity to gain a foundation of the Arabic language within its broader context of rich history, literature and culture of the Arab World and other nations where the Arabic language plays a major societal role. Students are exposed to several manifestation of the Arabic Culture such as food, music, film, poetry and social customs.

Cluster Coordinator/email:  Chair, Department of World Languages and Cultures, and Professor of Languages, Dr. John Boitano

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors

Courses: Take two classes from Segment I, ARAB 301 (Segment II), and one class from Segment III.

Segment I: Students are required to take two of the following classes:
ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic I
ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic II [ARAB 101]
ARAB 202: Intermediate Arabic II [ARAB 201, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot be doubled counted with 7LC.)
ARAB 299: Individual Study [freshman or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor]

Segment II: Students are required to take Arabic 301-Advanced Arabic
ARAB 301: The Language and Culture of the Arab World: A Contemporary Perspective [ARAB 201, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor]

Segment III: Students are required to take one of the following classes:
ARAB 399: Individual Study
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with REL 304)
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
POSC 326: Politics of the Contemporary Middle East (cross listed with HIST 325)
POSC 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross-listed as PCST 353)
POSC 358: Islam and the West (cross listed with PCST 358 and REL 358)
REL 303: Readings in Qur'an and Hadith

The following courses may count when they contain a substantial Arabic Studies component, and they must have the cluster coordinator's approval:
HIST 399: Individual Study and Research (related topic to be approved by cluster coordinator)
POSC 399: Individual Study and Research (related topic to be approved by cluster coordinator)

Asian Studies

Focus: This cluster focuses on the study of Asian religions, cultures, and history, allowing students to familiarize themselves with aspects of South and East Asia. With Japan’s current powerful place in the world economy and with the rich cultural heritages of India and China and their growing economic, cultural, and political importance in the global community today, this area of study is essential. This multidisciplinary cluster will allow students to deepen their understanding of Asian worldviews, religious and cultural values, art, and history.

Cluster Coordinator/Email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Religious Studies.

Courses: Choose four of the following courses, two of which must be at the upper division.

AH 202: Art of India, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia
AH 203: Exchange and Evolution in the Arts of China and Japan
HIST 190: Modern East Asia Histories and Popular Cultures
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokémon: A Social History of Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia
PHIL 120: Global Ethics and Religion  (cross listed with REL 120)
PHIL 125: Philosophy of Religion (cross listed with REL 125)
POSC 324: Asian Politics
REL 115: Living Religions of the World
REL 335: Hinduism and the Religions of India
REL 336: Buddhism

Business and Economics Cluster

Focus: This cluster is designed to introduce students to the essential concepts of business and economics.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Dean in the Argyros School of Business and Economics, Dr. Candace Ybarra

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Accounting, Business, or Economics majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Central and Eastern European History and Culture

Focus: Students taking this cluster have the opportunity to study the history, politics, and culture of Central and Eastern Europe both at Chapman and at the Anglo-American University in Prague.* This multi-ethnic region, encompassing Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the former Soviet Union, was the backdrop for the emergence of Communism and National Socialism, two World Wars and the Cold War, dramatic revolutions in the arts, and the reemergence of nationalist debates in the post-Communist era.

*Chapman University offers free airfare to students who choose to study abroad at AAU. For more information, please contact the Center for Global Education.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Art, Dr. Wendy Salmond

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. 

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Chapman Courses
AH 333: Modern Russian Art
AH 334: Soviet and Post-Soviet Art
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (Same as REL 307)
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 311: Russian History

Chapman courses taught at the Anglo-American University in Prague
IPCP 202: Nations and Nationalism
IPCP 207: History of the Cold War and Post-Cold War Transition

Courses taught at the Anglo-American University in Prague--Courses in your major discipline are not eligible. (Note: not all courses offered each semester.)
Credit will be transferred back to Chapman under a different course number.
ART 131: Prague Art and Architecture
ART 150: Cities of Central Europe: Prague, Krakow, Bratislava, Budapest
ART 225: Postwar European Film
ART 275: Modernism
ART 286 The Russian Avant-Garde
ART 337/537: Eroticism, Power and Fate in the Cinema of Central Europe
ART 372/572: Contemporary Art Scene
CZE 100: Elementary Czech Language and Culture
ECO 320: EU Market and Business Policies
ECO 445: Economics of the European Union
HIS 122: European History II: The Making of Modern Europe
HIS 181: Jewish History and Culture
HIS 200: European Music History and Appreciation
HIS 236: The Jewish Experience in Central Europe
HIS 237: Central Europe History
HIS 238: Tradition and Modernity: Jewish Culture in Central Europe
HIS 239: Jewish Prague
HIS 270: 20th Century Social History
HIS 336: The Holocaust and its Representation
HIS 370: East Central European Post War History
HIS 380: History of Racism and Anti-Semitism
HSS 260 Czech Culture in Film and Literature
IRS 100: History of the Cold War and Post-Cold War Transition
JEW 221: Jewish Community in the Czech Republic After World War II
JRN 321: Media Impact in the New Europe
LIT 232: 1,000 years of Czech literature: from Kosmas to Kundera
LIT 233: Central European Literature
LIT 406/506: Václav Havel
LIT 430: Franz Kafka: An Advanced Seminar
POL 205: Ethnic and Religious Minorities in Central and Eastern Europe
POL 320: Politics of the European Union
POL 330: Central and Eastern European Politics
POS 204 Nations and Nationalism
POS 373/673: Modern German History
POL 381: Multiculturalism in Europe
SOC 301: Central and Eastern Europe Totalitarian Experience

Chinese Studies

Focus: The Chinese Cluster provides students with the opportunity to gain a foundation in the Chinese language within its broader context of rich history, literature, and culture of the Chinese-speaking World as well as other nations where the Chinese language plays a major societal role. Students are exposed to several manifestations of Chinese Culture such as food, music, film, and social customs. The goal of this cluster is to enrich students with a better understanding of Chinese culture and Chinese language.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Instructor of Languages, I-Ting Chao 

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must complete three courses from Section I and one course from section II.

Section I (take 3 of the following courses)
CHIN 201: Intermediate Chinese I [CHIN 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
CHIN 202: Intermediate Chinese II [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
CHIN 299: Individual Study [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 301: Chinese Culture and Society [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 341: Literary and Cinematographic Images of The Chinese [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 345: Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 346: Advanced Chinese Conversation and Composition II [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 347: Business Chinese [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor]

Section II (take 1 of the following courses)
FS 443A: Asian Cinema [FTV 140, and FS 244, or 245]
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
POSC 324: Asian Politics
REL 336: Buddhism
SOC 326: Mind, Self, and Society in Tibetan Buddhism
CHIN 399: Individual Study and Research

Comparative World Religions

Focus: This cluster focuses on the comparative study of world religions and is designed to increase student understanding of the diverse religious traditions embraced by people around the world and to facilitate their ability to make comparisons across traditions. All courses within this cluster are comparative in nature and include at least one tradition outside of the western monotheisms of Judaism, Christianity and Islam (a separate cluster exists dealing exclusively with these traditions).

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Dr. Nancy Martin, Associate Professor and Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Religious Studies
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

REL 115: Living Religions of the World
REL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (cross listed with PHIL 120)
REL 130: The Study of Religion
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 330a: Women and Religion: Voodoo in Context
REL 334: Religion and Love in World Religions
REL 335: Hinduism and the Religions of India
REL 335a: Religion of India: Diversity and Dialogue
REL 336: Buddhism
REL 350: Happiness: Exploring Its Spirtual and Rational Foundations
REL 351: Health, Healing and Wholeness in the World Religions
REL 352: Quantum Theory, Cosmology and Consciousness
REL 353: Religion and Medicine
REL 355: New Religious Movements
REL 375: Violence and Nonviolence in Society and Religion
REL 380: Law and Religion

Computing Sciences

Focus: The Computing Sciences have had a profound impact on almost every area of human endeavor. In this cluster, students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to explore the use of computers in their chosen field. The cluster can also be used as the first steps toward a minor in Computer Science. 

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Dean of Operations, and Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, Dr. Erik Linstead

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, Data Analytics, or Software Engineering.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

CPSC 230: Computer Science I
CPSC 231: Computer Science II [CPSC 230, or equivalent]
CPSC 236: Visual Programming [CPSC 230, or equivalent]
CPSC 330: Digital Logic Design I [Prerequisite, MATH 250. Corequisite, CPSC 330L.]
CPSC 350: Data Structures and Algorithms [CPSC 231]
CPSC 353: Data Communications and Computer Networks [CPSC 231]
CPSC 392: Introduction to Data Science [CPSC 230]
CPSC 408: Database Management [CPSC 236, CPSC 350]

Cross Cultural Studies

Focus: This cluster is designed to provide the student with differential worldviews as expressed in culture, the arts, and societal institutions. Courses in the cluster provide a broad overview of how societies across the globe translate their mores, values, arts, and priorities into functioning realities. The cluster courses illustrate the unique and creative ways cultures evolve solutions to problems we all confront to some degree.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Culture of the Classical World

Focus: This cluster provides a variety of courses in the arts, history, and philosophy that explore the richness of the classical heritage that continues to shape our complex, modern world. To better understand ourselves, we must grapple with fundamental issues raised during this crucial period of world history, celebrating not only the beauty wrought by artists and thinkers, but also the difficult problems they introduced to societies across the globe.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Art History and Archeology, Dr. Justin Walsh

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 200: Ancient to Medieval Art
AH 300: Art of Ancient Egypt
AH 303: The Ancient Greek City
AH 305: Early Greek Art
AH 306: Later Greek Art
AH 379: Rome: The Development of the City
AH 400: Cultural Heritage and the Art World
ENG 221: Literature I (Antiquity to 1400 CE)
GRK 101: Elementary Classical Greek I
GRK 102: Elementary Classical Greek II [GRK 101]
HIST 201: The Rise of World Civilizations
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with REL 304)
LAT 101: Elementary Latin I
LAT 102: Elementary Latin II [LAT 101]
MUS 101: Introduction to Music
PHIL 310: From Socrates to Aquinas (cross listed with REL 310)
REL 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with HIST 315)
TH 150: Theatre in World Cultures

Data Analytics

Focus: As our ability to collect and analyze data continues to grow, so does the need for scientists who can analyze it at a scale never before thought possible. The Data Analytics cluster provides students a deep introduction to data management and statistical modeling tools and techniques that can be applied in many disciplines today.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor, Erik Linstead

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Computer Science, Data Analytics, or Software Engineering.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.
 
CPSC 230: Introduction to Computer Science
CPSC 236: Visual Programming [CPSC 230]
CPSC 308: Enterprise Data Management [CPSC 230 or CPSC 236]
CPSC 392: Introduction to Data Science [CPSC 230]
CPSC 393: Machine Learning
CPSC 408: Database Management [CPSC 236 and CPSC 350]
MATH 203: Introduction to Statistics
MGSC 220: Introduction to Business Analytics

Design and History Fundamentals in Cinematography

Focus: This cluster encourages students to explore the artistic, cultural, design and scientific influences from which the art and craft of cinematography has emerged, with the primary purpose on strengthening students' visual design abilities in approaching the creation of a motion-picture work.

Cluster Coordinator/email:  Film Division Chair, Assistant Professor, Pavel Jech

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Art, Art History or Graphic Design programs.
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 200: Ancient to Medieval Art
AH 201: Renaissance to Modern Art
AH 320: Italian Renaissance Art
AH 321: Northern Renaissance Art
AH 331: History of Photography
AH 332: Modern Art
AH 335: Theories of Modernism
AH 340: Contemporary Art: 1945 to 1970
AH 341: Contemporary Art: 1970 to the Present
GD 103: Visualization – Perspective and Rendering [graphic design major, or minor. Corequisite, GD 102]
GD 200: Introduction to Graphic Design [GD 102, 103, sophomore standing, and graphic design major, or minor, or consent of instructor. Corequisite, GD 201]
GD 202: Web Design [GD 102, 103, and graphic design major, or art, art history, or graphic design minor. Corequisite GD 200, 201, or consent of instructor.]
GD 203: Color [GD 200, 201, and graphic design major, or minor, and sophomore standing, or consent of instructor.]
GD 304: History of Graphic Design [GD 200, 201 and graphic design major, or art, art history or graphic design minor, or consent of instructor.]

Disability Studies

Focus: This cluster promotes the interdisciplinary study of disability across the domains of human experience. Students in this cluster will explore the variety of approaches to understanding disability in personal, social, economic, artistic, and political contexts. The cluster focuses on issues in the representation and interpretation of disability as a social category of human difference rather than issues related to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of impairments.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Political Science, Dr. Art Blaser, and Assistant Professor of Engineering, Dr. LouAnne Boyd

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

CPSC 358: Assistive Technology
EDUC 471: Collaboration and Inclusivity
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping
IES 317: Disability, Families, and Society: Issues of Professional Policy and Support
IES 413: Current Issues in Disability Studies and Services
HIST 233: Disability and American Life
HIST 342: History of Everyday Life in America
PHIL 314: Medical Ethics
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
POSC 239: People with Disabilities in Politics and Society  (cross listed with PCST 239)
POSC 439: Disability and the Law  (cross listed with PCST 439)
SOC 385: Medical Sociology

Earth and Its Environment

Focus: Environmental issues involve essential interactions between the natural sciences and social sciences, spanning a range of fields including biology, chemistry, economics, geology, political science, and others. This cluster is designed to integrate and form bridges between these fields so that students can better comprehend and critically analyze the environmental topics of greatest concern in today's society. Completion of courses in this cluster fulfills many of the course requirements for the minor in Environmental Sciences.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Dr. Jason Keller

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

BIOL 301: Plant Biology, Lecture and Laboratory [BIOL 205]
BIOL 319: Ecosystem Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory [BIOL 205]
BIOL 324: Ecology, Lecture and Laboratory [BIOL 205]
BIOL 338: Ornithology [BIOL 205] 
BIOL 433: Animal Behavior [BIOL 205]
BIOL 440: Marine Biology, Lecture and Laboratory [BIOL 205]
CHEM 105: Chemistry of Environmental Issues
CHEM 325: Atmospheric Chemistry [CHEM 331, CHEM 340]
CHEM 327: Environmental Geochemistry [CHEM 331, CHEM 340]
ENV 101: Introduction to Environmental Science
ENV 102: Introduction to Environmental Policy
ENV 111: Physical Geology [Corequisite ENV 111L]
ENV 112: Introduction to Hazards and Global and Environmental Change
ENV 227: Darwin and the Galapagos [consent of instructor] (travel course)
ENV 301: Environmental Geology [ENV 111, or ENV 112]
ENG 374: Environmental Rhetoric
ENV 392: Law and Policy of Water Resources Mangement [ENV 102 or POSC 110]
PHIL 303: Environmental Ethics
POSC 346: Environmental Law [POSC 110]
POSC 374: Environmental Politics and Policy (cross listed with ENV 374)
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101]

Suggested Clusterings:

Earth Science Focus: ENV 111 or ENV 112, and 2 from CHEM 327, ENV 301, ENV 310, ENV 330, plus one from the list above.

Ecology Focus: 3 from BIOL 301, BIOL 319, BIOL 324, BIOL 338, BIOL 433, BIOL 440, plus one from the list above.

Chemistry Focus: CHEM 105 and 2 from CHEM 325, CHEM 327, plus one from the list above.

Policy Focus: ENV 102, plus 3 from ENV 392, PHIL 303, POSC 346, POSC 374, SOC 335.

Ethics

Focus: Students in this cluster will explore a wide variety of controversial ethical issues, such as war, global warming, abortion, affirmative action, the nature and limits of corporate responsibility and service to others. Let rich philosophical traditions help you to arrive at your own positions, support those conclusions with good reasons, and understand why others might disagree. You will investigate such values as justice, autonomy, and compassion, and will further develop your ability to critically assess arguments and creatively solve problems.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Philosophy Department Chair, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Dr. G. Michael Pace

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Philosophy
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

 

PHIL 104: Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 120: Global Ethics and Religion [cross listed with REL 120]
PHIL 303: Environmental Ethics
PHIL 306: Games and Decisions
PHIL 312: Ethics Bowl
PHIL 314: Medical Ethics
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 318: Political and Legal Philosophy
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
PHIL 324: Philosophy of Law
PHIL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought [cross listed with REL 325/PCST 325]
PHIL 326: Global Justice
PHIL 327: Food Ethics
PHIL 357: Topics in Humanomics [crosslisted with ECON 357, ENG 357]

European History

Focus: This cluster contains courses that give students the chance to explore European history to gain a broad overview, expand their knowledge of several cultures, or develop an in-depth understanding of a particular era.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.  

GRK 101: Elementary Classical Greek I
GRK 102: Elementary Classical Greek II [GRK 101]
HIST 110: Western Civilization: From Mesopotamia to the Renaissance
HIST 112: Western Civilization: From the Reformation to Modern Times
HIST 211: Mother Russia and Uncle Sam during the Cold War: Conflict and Coexistence
HIST 234: 3000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with REL 304)
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 306: The Middle Ages (cross listed with REL 306)
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 311: Russian History
HIST 312: History of Spain and Portugal
HIST 313: Modern British History
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 346i: Travel Course: Topics in Historical Tours; A Tale of Two Cities
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a]
HIST 365b: The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories
LAT 101: Elementary Latin I

LAT 102: Elementary Latin II [LAT 101]

The French/Francophone Studies

Focus: Promotes the interdisciplinary study of the rich histories, literatures, and cultures of the French-speaking world.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of World Languages and Cultures, and Associate Professor of French and Peace Studies, Dr. John Boitano

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in French

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ART 461: 19th and 20th Century French Art (Cannes)
FREN 201: Intermediate French I [FREN 102] (This course cannot be double counted in LC.)
FREN 202: Intermediate French II [FREN 201] (This course cannot be double counted in LC.)
FREN 323: French Popular Music: A Mirror of Society [FREN 201]
FREN 340: Cuisine in French Literature and Film [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 341: Literary and Cinematographic Images of the French Past: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 345: Topics in Advanced French Conversation and Composition I [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 346: Topics in Advanced French Conversation and Composition II [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 347: Business French [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 348: Topics in Francophone Literatures of the World [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 349: French Theatre Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 350: French Poetry Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 352: French Writers of the Nouveau Roman (New Novel) [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 353: Topics in Historical Tours: Paris, A Literary History [FREN 201, or consent of instructor] (cross listed with HIST 346H)
FREN 353B: Topics in Historical Tours: A Literary History of the French Riviera and Provence [FREN 201]
FREN 353C: Topics in Historical Tours: A Tale of Two Cities [FREN 201, or consent of instructor] (cross listed with HIST 346i)
FREN 354: French Opera in the Time of the Sun King: The “Libretti” of Quinault and Music of Lully [FREN 201, or consent of instructor] (cross listed with MUS 354)
FREN 355: Memories of World War II in French Films [FREN 201]
FREN 356: Topics in French Opera [FREN 201, or consent of instructor for FREN 356]
FREN 357: French Surrealism [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 360: Performance in French [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 365: Of Avatars and Apes: The Supernatural and Science in French Fiction [FREN 201]
FREN 370: Writing About Food: French Composition [FREN 201]
FREN 375: Topics in French Literature [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 378:Contemporary French Society, Politics, The European Union and French-Speaking World [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 380: Intensive Frnehc Language: Upper Intermediate (Cannes) [consent of instructor]
FREN 386: Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 387:Remakes and Adaptations in Films: From France to Hollywood [FREN 201]
FREN 389: The French Philosopher and the French Enlightenment [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 399: Individual Study [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 499: Individual Study [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FTV 311: Cinema Francais/French Cinema (Cannes) 
POSC 303: La Vie Politique en France/French Political Life (Cannes)
SOC 309: La Societe Francaise/French Society (Cannes)
TH 310: Expression Theatrale/Acting: Theatrical Expression (Cannes)

Game Development

Focus: The computer and video game industry has exploded and its annual revenue now exceeds the box office revenue of the film industry. But game development technology is used for scientific simulation, training, and other serious applications as well. In this cluster, students will explore the possibilities of the game industry and will begin to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to use game development technology in a variety of fields.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Assistant Professor, Derek Prate

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Computer Science, Data Analytics, or Software Engineering.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

CPSC 230: Computer Science I
CPSC 236: Visual Programming [CPSC 230]
CPSC 242: Introduction to the Game Industry
CPSC 244: Level Design I [CPSC 230, CPSC 242]
CPSC 245: Unity Programming [CPSC 236]
CPSC 246: The Unreal Game Engine [CPSC 230]
CPSC 340: Game Development [CPSC 244 and either CPSC 231, or CPSC 236]
CPSC 344: Level Design II [CPSC 244]
CPSC 440: Collaborative Game Development [CPSC 340]
AVE 120: Introduction to Animation and Visual Effects
AVE 202: 3D Computer Graphics I
AVE 256: Beginning Character Animation [DA 206, digital arts major]

German Studies

Focus: This cluster affords students the opportunity to acquire a foundation in the German language as well as a broad understanding of the history, culture, and literature of the German-speaking nations.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Languages, Dr. Walter Tschacher

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in German.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

GER 202: Intermediate German II [GER 201] (This course cannot be double counted in 7LC.)
GER 341: German Film [GER 201]
GER 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 345: German Conversation [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 347: Business German [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 360: Performance in German [GER 201, or consent of Instructor]
GER 375: German Literature [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 378: German Culture and Civilization [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 307)

Global Ethics and Communication

Focus: This cluster focuses on comparative ethical reasoning in a global context and on intercultural communication. In the contemporary world we face global ethical issues about health, human rights, war, poverty, and human dignity. It is crucial to international relations and to our mutual flourishing as a global community that we are able to communicate across cultures and that we appreciate different cultures’ values and ways of ethical reasoning. This multidisciplinary cluster is designed to facilitate this type of communication and cooperation.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Dr. Nancy Martin, Associate Professor and Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Religious Studies majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

COM 211: Intercultural Communication
ENG 206: Critical Literacies and Community Writing
ENG 302: Writing about Diverse Cultures
ENG 372: Language and Ideology
ENG 374: Environmental Rhetoric
REL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (cross listed with PHIL 120)
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Times
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 336: Buddhism
REL 380: Law and Religion

Histories and Religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to explore the history, values, and practice of the three major Abrahamic religious traditions.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Dr. Nancy Martin, Associate Professor and Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Religious Studies majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. At least one course must be taken from a minimum of 3 of the 4 categories below (Judaism, Christianity, Islam or Comparative). The fourth course can be drawn from any category or selected from the list of the related courses.

Judaism:
REL 200: Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures
REL 213: Introduction to Judaism
REL 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with HIST 304)
REL 323: Interpretation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament)

Christianity:
REL 201: Introduction to the New Testament
REL 214: Introduction to Christianity
REL 310: From Socrates to Aquinas (cross listed with PHIL 310)
REL 311: Descartes to Kierkegaard (cross listed with PHIL 311)
REL 319: Images of Jesus
REL 324: Interpretation of the New Testament

Islam:
REL 202: Introduction to Islam
REL 303: Readings in Qur'an and Hadith
 
Comparative:
REL 115: Living Religions of the World
REL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (cross listed with PHIL 120)
REL 316: Genesis and Gender
REL 330: Women and Religion

Related Courses:
GRK 101: Elementary Classical Greek I
GRK 102: Elementary Classical Greek II [GRK 101]
HIST 365A: Perpetrators, Witnesses, Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365A)
HIST 365B: The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories
LAT 101: Elementary Latin I
LAT 102: Elementary Latin II [LAT 101]
REL 130: The Study of Religion
REL 150: The Bible and Popular Culture: Engaging the Sacred Text
REL 204: Mesopotamian Myths and Rituals
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 307)
REL 312: Religious Experience in Film and Fiction
REL 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with HIST 315)
REL 366: The Latino/a Religious Experience: From Colonialism to Liberation

Histories and Religions of the East

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to explore the history, values, and practice of major Eastern religious traditions.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to History majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 202: Art of India, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia
AH 203: Exchange and Evolution in the Arts of China and Japan
HIST 190: From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 210: Modern Middle East History (cross listed with POSC 210)
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 264: Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory
HIST 275: Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with REL 315)
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 319: Israel/Palestine: 3,000 Years (cross listed with POSC 319 and PCST 319)
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
HIST 354: Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine/Body
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
REL 115: Living Religions of the World
REL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (cross listed with PHIL 120)
REL 330: Women in Religion
REL 335: Hinduism and the Religions of India
REL 336: Buddhism

History and Media

Focus: This cluster allows students to examine the impact of film, photography, and other forms of mass media as agents of historical change, as appropriate media for presenting history, and as materials that provide insight into the past.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to History majors. 

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

COM 151: Mass Communication
*COM 351: Propaganda and Public Opinion [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
FS 244: History of Film to 1959
FS 245: History of Film 1960 to present [FS 244]
HIST 234: 3000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 252: History and Film
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 256: Film and American History
HIST 258: Latin American History through Film
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 333: Images of American History
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States
ITAL 341: Italian Cinema: Politics, Art, and Industry (cross listed with FS 443f)
ITAL 387: Italian American Cinema (cross listed with FS 444m)
POSC 317: Media and Politics
*TWP 246: History of Television

History of the World

Focus: This cluster contains courses that give students the chance to explore the history of the non-Western world, including Asia, Africa, and South America.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.  

HIST 160: African Voices: African History to 1800
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 190: From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 201: The Rise of World Civilizations
HIST 202: Modern World Civilizations
HIST 210: Modern Middle East History (cross listed with POSC 210)
HIST 220: The Vietnam Wars
HIST 221: Native American History: The Struggle to be Heard
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 252: History and Film
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 258: Latin American History through Film
HIST 260: Asian History and Film
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 264: Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in African Past
HIST 275: Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with REL 315)
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 319: Israel/Palestine: 3000 Years (cross listed with POSC 319 and PCST 319)
HIST 333: Images of American History
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine/Body
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)

The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Focus: This cluster explores genocide and its causes; social, legal, and political responses to genocide; the historical and social context of genocide; and the depiction of genocide in literature, with special focus upon a comparative examination of the Holocaust and subsequent acts of genocide.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History or Political Science.

Courses: Choose four of the following, at least two of which must be upper division.

Take three courses from the list below:
HIST 307 - Germany and the Holocaust
PCST 352 - Race and Change in South Africa and the United States
POSC 251 - Intercultural Conflict and Communication
POSC 323 - Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity
POSC 328 - Human Rights Law

Take one course from the list below:
FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (core, cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
POSC 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (core, cross listed with PCST 251)
POSC 323: Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity (core, cross listed with PCST 323
POSC 328: Human Rights Law (core, cross listed with PCST 328)

The Holocaust in Modern European History

Focus: This cluster explores the Holocaust within the context of the history of Judaism, the development of anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism, and Europe after World War I.

Cluster Coordinator/email:  Director, The Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education, Stern Chair in Holocaust Education, and Professor of Religious Studies and History, Dr. Marilyn Harran

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History or Religious Studies

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201]
GER 351: The Holocaust in German Literature and Film [GER 201] (cross listed with HUM 351)
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
HIST 365b: The Holocaust Memoirs and Histories 
HIST 367: The Holocaust in Eastern Europe

Italian Studies

Focus: This multidisciplinary cluster allows students to explore the language, culture, film, literature, music, and history of Italy.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sebastian Paul and Marybelle Musco Chair; Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Federico Pacchioni

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must complete a minimum of two courses from Section I. The remaining two courses may be taken from Section I or Section II.

Section I (Choose a minimum of two courses.)
ITAL 201: Intermediate Italian I [ITAL 102] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
ITAL 202: Intermediate Italian II [ITAL 201] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
ITAL 301: Conversation and Composition: Regional Culture and Tradition [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 311: A Region of Fantasy: Journey through Emilia-Romagna [ITAL 201] (Travel Course)
ITAL 340: History and Culture of Food in Italy [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 342: Advanced Italian: Grammar and Stylistics [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 344: Advanced Italian Conversation and Composition [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 345: Conversation and Composition: Introduction to Contemporary Society [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 346: Italian Translation for Tourism and Cultural Promotion [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 347: Business Italian: Professional Language and Culture [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 349: The Forms of Italian Theatre: History and Practice [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 352: The Fantastic in Italian Literature [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 353: The Short Narrative in Italian Culture: Oral Tradition, Literature, and Cinema [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 354: Songs of Italy: Voices of Yesterday and Today [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 375: Masterpieces of Italian Literature [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 377: The New Italians: Immigration and Globalization in Twenty-First Century Italy [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 385: From Page to Screen: Literature and Film in Italy [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]

Section II 
FTV 361I: Structure of an International Film Festival [consent of instructor]
HIST 306: The Middle Ages (cross listed with REL 306)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HON 371: The World of Fellini’s Cinema (requires permission for non-Honors students.)
HON 373: The Puppet Metaphor Across Media (requires permission for non-Honors students.)
HON 455: Interpreting the Past: An Experience of Rome (Travel course, requires permission for Honors students)
IES 444: Aesthetics and Learning: Florence Italy [consent of instructor] (Travel Course)
ITAL 341: Italian Cinema: Politics, Art and Culture (cross listed with FS 443f)
ITAL 387: Italian American Cinema (cross listed with FS 444M)

(The following course may count when it contains substantial Italian language component and it must have the cluster coordinator's approval.)
ENG 449: Literature in Translation (Italian topics only, a special substitution) [Written Inquiry]

Japanese Studies

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to learn about Japanese language, culture, and history.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Assistant Professor of Japanese, Dr. Michael Wood

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Requirements: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must complete three or four courses from Section I, or three courses from Section 1 and one course from Section II.

Section I (Language courses - take three of the following courses.)
JPN 101: Elementary Japanese I
JPN 102: Elementary Japanese II [JPN 101]
JPN 201: Intermediate Japanese I [JPN 102, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot double count in 7LC.)
JPN 202: Intermediate Japanese II [JPN 201, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot double count in 7LC.)
JPN 291: Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity [consent of instructor]
JPN 301: Intensive Kanji Study [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 343: Advanced Japanese Grammar and Composition [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 345: Japanese Conversation [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 347: Business Japanese [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 348: Reading Japanese History [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 349: Advanced Japanese: Topics in Literature and Cinema [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 491: Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity [consent of instructor]
JPN 499: Independent Study [consent of instructor, or seniors who have fulfilled advanced courses in Japanese]

Section II (take one of the following courses if you take only three courses from Section I. Many classes taken from approved study abroad programs in Japan may count if the student receives prior approval from the cluster coordinator.)
AH 203: Exchange and Evolution of Arts in China and Japan
HIST 190:  From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 260: Asian History and Film
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia
HON 240: Anime and War [consent of instructor]
HON 363: The Castaway Narrative in World Literature [consent of instructor]
REL 336: Buddhism

(The following course may count for this cluster if there is a substantial Japanese language component, and with the cluster coordinator's approval.)
ENG 449: Literature in Translation [written inquiry]

Latin American Studies

Focus: This cluster offers students a foundation in the Spanish language and Latin American history, culture, and politics.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History or Spanish.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take one course in each of the cluster subdivisions of Sociopolitical Studies, Historical Studies, and Language & Culture; the fourth course choice is open, though all students in the cluster complete a minimum of one Spanish language course.

Sociopolitical Studies:
ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights; Peace and Justice in the Americas  (cross listed with ANTH 330)
ANTH 360: North and Middle American Indians
POSC 327: Latin American Politics

Historical Studies:
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848 to Present
HIST 258: Latin American History Through Film

Language & Culture:
SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II [SPAN 201]
SPAN 326: Reading and Interpreting Literature  [SPAN 343, 344]
SPAN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition  [SPAN 202]
SPAN 345: Spanish Conversation  [SPAN 202]
SPAN 377: Literature and Culture of Latin America I  [SPAN 326]
SPAN 378: Literature and Culture of Latin America II  [SPAN 326]
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
SPAN 397: United States Latino Literatures and Cultures  [SPAN 326]
SPAN 398: Twentieth-Century Latin American Fiction  [SPAN 326]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [300-level Spanish course]
SPAN 441: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology [SPAN 202]

Law and Public Policy

Focus: This cluster is designed for pre-law students to expose them to questions of the law and policy. Cluster courses are liberal-arts-based and examine law in the context of the larger social and political framework in which laws are made and enforced, bridging courses in the major and the professional law school curriculum.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Political Science majors; cross-listed courses are not open to Peace Studies majors as cluster options.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. It is strongly suggested that students seeking to complete this cluster enroll in POSC 110: Introduction to American Politics and/or POSC 120: Introduction to International Relations prior to taking these following courses.

Law and Social Control

Focus: This cluster deals with the concept of law and social control from a broad interdisciplinary approach, encompassing both formal and informal mechanisms of social control.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Sociology

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take at least two courses from the Sociology offerings.

Leadership Cluster

Focus: Everywhere you look, it is obvious that the world is in desperate need of more – and better! – leaders. Recent national surveys reveal that leadership competencies (encompassing interpersonal, communication, critical thinking and decision-making skills) are the # 1 priority for prospective employers, and for good reason. The best leaders strive to bring out the best in others and act from a moral/ethical base to improve their organizations and/or serve the world around them. The “LEAD cluster” provides a foundation for enhancing your understanding and practice of leadership in both personal and professional life. Theoretical models are often reinforced through experiential learning, linking theory and practice. The cluster is a valuable complement to any major in the university, and allows students to connect in meaningful ways with colleagues throughout the university. The LEAD Cluster is further customized through the selection of a Leadership Interest Area.

Cluster Coordinator/Email: Director, Leadership Studies Program, and Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Education, Dr. Mark Maier.

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. (However, students may NOT apply courses from their major field or discipline towards the cluster)

Courses: Four LEAD or leadership-related courses from the listing below, totaling 12 credits, at least 2 courses of which (at least 6 credits) MUST be in leadership (“LEAD”), and 2 courses of which (6 credits) must be at the upper division level. NOTES: The listing of a course here does not guarantee admission or access to the course, including the LEAD courses listed.  Programs reserve the right to restrict admission to selected courses to their majors or minors (i.e., students in their programs). [Prerequisites listed in brackets.] Other courses may be applied, subject to the approval of the Cluster Coordinator. “Blanket approvals” designated by the Cluster Coordinator shall not be construed as exceptions or waivers for program evaluation purposes.

Take at least 1 LEAD Foundations course (including, but not limited to) from among the following:
LEAD 101: Introduction to Leadership: Principles & Practices
LEAD 260: The Leader as Teacher & Coach
LEAD 301: Theory and Practice of Leadership
LEAD 310: Emotional Intelligence, Leadership and the Good Life
LEAD 382: Principles of Effective Facilitation
LEAD 495: Special Topics in Leadership and Organization Studies


Take at least 1 LEAD elective:
This may be ANY course in “LEAD,” including but not limited to any of the above courses and:
LEAD 240: Leadership, Communication, and Conflict Resolution (Interterm)
LEAD 302: Developing Effective Teams (4 credits, formerly LEAD 297, LEAD 314)
LEAD 315: The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity in the Workplace 
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion & Service  [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 333: Theory & Practice of Career Development (P/NP)
LEAD 360: Sports in Contemporary Society: A Leadership Perspective
LEAD 365: Ethical Controversies in Sports and Leadership
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum [LEAD 297/314 or consent]
LEAD 383: Critical Discourse, Social Change and Positive Peace
LEAD 384: Ethnic Studies Activism: Theory and Practice
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 396: Gender & Leadership  [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 397: Leading as a Way of Serving (restricted to minors first, 4 credits, P/NP; formerly LEAD 414)
LEAD 410: The Leader as Global Citizen [Summer International Travel Couse]
LEAD 429: Experimental Course
LEAD 475: Introduction to Students Affairs in Higher Education
LEAD 485: Leadership in Times of Crisis: Case Studies in Disaster Response [Interterm Travel Course]
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action, Internship
LEAD 495: Special Topics (in Leadership & Organization Studies)
LEAD 499: Individual Study

Take any 2 additional leadership-related electives, either from the above or from the following
(Organized by potential/optional areas of student interest)

Arts and Leadership 
AMST 282: Folklore
AMST 372: Images of American Indians
FREN 386: Images of Leadership in French Literature [FREN 201 or instructor consent)]
IES 316: Aesthetic Education: Philosophy and Practice [or IES 444: Aesthetics and Learning: Florence, Italy – Interterm Travel Course)]
ENG 372: Language and Ideology
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
MUS 201C: American Popular Music: Protest Music
MUS 201E: American Popular Music: LGBT Perspectives
MUS 202: Music and Gender
SOC 310: Feminist Art-Theory-Power (Same as WMST 310) [SOC 101 or WMST 101]
TH 320: Improvisation

Athletics and Leadership, Sports in Society
COM 302: Sports Communication [COM/SCC 100 and COM/SCC 295]
ENG 241: Introduction to Sports Journalism
HIST 240: History of America through Sport
LEAD 260: The Leader as Teacher & Coach
LEAD 302 : Developing Effective Teams (4 credits; space available basis) (Formerly LEAD 297 or 314)
LEAD 360: Sports in Contemporary Society: A Leadership Perspective
LEAD 365: Ethical Controversies in Sports and Leadership
PSY 345: Sports Psychology [PSY 101]

Diversity & Inclusion in Leadership
HIST 233: Disability and American Life
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: Bonfires of Change
HUM 102: Introduction to Latinx and Latin American Studies
HUM 200: Women’s Realities
HUM 205: Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies
HUM 310: Theoretical Foundations of LatinX and Latin American Studies
IES 102: The Social Construction of Difference
IES 150: Introduction to Disability Studies: Challenging Myths of Normalcy (Same as PCST/POSC 150)
IES 300: Valuing Differences in American Society
IES 317: Disabilities, Family, & Society
LEAD 315: The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity in the Workplace
LEAD 384: Ethnic Studies Activism: Theory and Practice
LEAD 396: Gender & Leadership [1 LEAD course or consent]
PCST 239: People with Disabilities in Politics and Society (Same as POSC 239)
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (Same as POSC 352)
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
POSC 309: Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society
POSC 318: Women and Politics
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (Same as HIST 307)
REL 316: Genesis and Gender
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 365: Topics in the Holocaust (Same as HIST 365)
SOC 281: Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity [SOC 101 or consent]
WMST 101: Introduction to Women’s Studies
WMST 300: Women in Leadership

Leadership in Action, including Social Entrepreneurship
BUS 100: Introduction to Business
COM 101: Public Speaking
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion for Non-Majors
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 371: U.S. Business and Entrepreneurial History (Same as ECON 371)
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum [LEAD 297/314 or consent]
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Case Studies in Disaster Response
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action Internship [½ -4 credits, variable, same as LEAD 492]
MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship for Non-Majors
MGMT 379: Launching a New Venture – Student Incubator
MGMT 495: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship 
POSC 304: Citizenship in Theory and Practice
POSC 486: Political Leadership
SCC 410: Training and Consulting in the Corporate Context [COM/SCC 100 and COM/SCC 295]
TWP 310: The New Era of Television

Peace Studies 
LEAD 240: Leadership, Communication, and Conflict Resolution (Interterm)
LEAD 383: Critical Discourse, Social Change and Positive Peace
PCST 150: Introduction to Peace Studies
PCST 253: Mediation and Conflict Resolution (Same as PCST 453)
PCST 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (Same as POSC 353)
PCST 354: Nonviolent Social Change (Same as POSC 354)
PCST 393: Peace Communication [PCST 150]
REL 375: Violence and Nonviolence in Society and Religion

Political Context of Leadership
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [1 LEAD course or consent]
POSC 120: Introduction to International Relations (Same as PCST 120)
POSC 304: Citizenship in Theory and Practice
POSC 310: The Presidency
POSC 318: Women and Politics
POSC 332: Democracy and Democratization
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
POSC 486: Political Leadership

Social Justice, Social Change and Leadership
ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas (Same as ANTH 330)
ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America (same as PCST 366)
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (Same as REL 359)
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (Same as REL 365a)
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Case Studies in Disaster Response
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (Same as POSC 352)
POSC 354: Nonviolent Social Change (Same as PCST/SOC 354)
SOC 217: Social Change Through Community Engagement
SOC 306: Social Movements [SOC 101]
SOC 346: Solving Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country (Interterm)

Spirituality, Values and Ethics in Leadership
IES 101: Self and Identity
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping
IES 301: Organizations, Ethics & Society
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion & Service [1 LEAD course or consent]
LEAD 397: Leading as a Way of Serving (4 credits; on a space available basis. Formerly LEAD 414)
PCST 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (Same as PHIL/REL 325)
PHIL 303: Environmental Ethics
PHIL 314: Medical Ethics
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 319: Images of Jesus
PSY 437: Health and Well-Being [PSY 101]
REL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (Same as PHIL 120)
REL 217: The Holocaust and Religious Faith
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 242: An Introduction to Mindfulness (1 credit)
REL 329: Experimental Course: An Introduction to Mindfulness
REL 350: Happiness: Exploring its Spiritual and Rational Foundations
REL 351: Health, Healing and Wholeness in World Religions
SOC 326: Mind, Self and Society in Tibetan Buddhism (Interterm)

Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies

Focus: The Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies Cluster offers interested students an in-depth opportunity to engage in the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer issues from a variety of perspectives, including biological, psychological, socio-cultural, political, philosophical, religious, literary, and artistic. This cluster can provide a valuable foundation for students preparing for careers in eduaction, law, public policy, health and social services, the arts, entertainment, and the ministry.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Rhetoric and Composition, Dr. Ian Barnard

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which a course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be at the upper division.

ANTH 300: Queer Anthropology [ANTH 102]
AH 401: Gender, Art, and Western Culture
COM 311: Gender and Communication
ENG 347: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Literature of the LGBTQ Experiences [ENG 256]
ENG 472: Film, Gender, Sexuality
FS 444C: Seminar in Film History: Queer Cinema  [FS 140 and FS 244 or 245]
HIST 200: A History of Sexuality
HUM 205: Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies
IES 102: Social Construction of Difference
IES 310: LGBTQ Issues in Education
MUS 201E: American Popular Music: LBGT Perspectives
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
POSC 309: Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society
PSY 340: Human Sexuality [PSY 101]
PSY 344: Psychology of Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation
SOC 281: Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOC 371: Sociology of Human Sexuality
 
The following courses may count in the cluster when they contain a substantial Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies component and they must have the cluster coordinator's approval:

DOC 321: The Documentary Tradition [television writing and production, or news and documentary major]
REL 316: Genesis and Gender
SOC 410: Victimless Crimes

Mathematics

Focus: The more mathematics you know, the more doors will be open to you. According to Bertrand Russell, “Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty.” This cluster can enable you to continue your study of mathematics and can also be used as the first steps toward a minor in Mathematics.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Mathematics, Dr. Adrian Vajiac

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Mathematics

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Completion of courses in this cluster fulfills many of the course requirements for the Mathematics minor.

MATH 110: Single Variable Calculus I [MATH 104]
MATH 111: Single Variable Calculus II [MATH 110]
MATH 115: Accelerated Calculus Part I: Differentiation and Integration [MATH 104]
MATH 116: Accelerated Calculus Part II: Series, Differential Equations and Multivariable Calculus [MATH 104]
MATH 208: Foundations of Geometry [MATH 099]
MATH 210: Multivariable Calculus [MATH 111]
MATH 211: Linear Algebra [MATH 111]
MATH 215: Introduction to Linear Algebra and Differential Equations [MATH 111 OR MATH 116]
MATH 250: Discrete Mathematics [MATH 104]
MATH 260: Number Theory [MATH 111 OR MATH 115]
MATH 350: Differential Equations [MATH 210, 211]
MATH 352: Discrete Mathematics II [MATH 250]
MATH 360: Probability Theory [MATH 210]
MATH 361: Mathematical Statistics [MATH 360]
MATH 370: Special Topics in Mathematics [prerequisites vary]
MATH 380: Introduction to Abstract Algebra [MATH 250]
MATH 390: Introduction to Differential Geometry [MATH 210]
MATH 440: Topology [MATH 211]
MATH 450: Real Analysis [MATH 211]
MATH 451: Complex Analysis [MATH 450]
MATH 454: Numerical Analysis [MATH 211]
MATH 460: Modern Algebra [MATH 380]

Media, Culture and Society

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to study the symbiotic relationship between media and social, political and cultural institutions.

Cluster Coordinator/email: English Department Chair and Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Communication or Strategic and Corporate Communication.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Focus: This cluster allows students to study the history, literature, religion, art, and culture of the Medieval and Renaissance period. Students are advised to take two lower-division courses before taking two required upper-division courses.

Cluster Coordinator/email: English Department Chair, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 200: Ancient and Medieval Art
AH 323: Arts of Tenochtitlán-Mexico City
ENG 221: Literature I (antiquity to 1400 CE)
ENG 325: Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG 332: Topics in Early Modern Literature [ENG 256 or HIST 308]
ENG 344: Topics in British Literature before 1850 [ENG 256]
ENG 355: Theater in England
ENG 430: Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories [ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210]
ENG 432: Shakespeare’s Tragedies and Romances [ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210]
GRK 101: Elementary Classical Greek I
GRK 102: Elementary Classical Greek II [GRK 101]
HIST 110: Western Civilization: From Mesopotamia to the Renaissance
HIST 201: The Rise of World Civilizations
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 306: The Middle Ages (cross listed with REL 306)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
LAT 101: Elementary Latin I
LAT 102: Elementary Latin II [LAT 101]
MUS 101: Introduction to Music
PHIL 310: From Socrates to Aquinas (cross listed with REL 310)
REL 213: Introduction to Judaism
TH 150: Theatre in World Cultures

The Modern Experience

Focus: Students choosing this cluster explore the experience of Modernity in diverse societies over the past two centuries. Courses in art, history, literature, film studies, and philosophy trace radical shifts in the perception and conception of self, society, nature, and other in response to new technologies, political and social upheavals, and the discovery of realities hitherto unimagined.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Art, Dr. Wendy Salmond

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

*Course will need permission to register and may not be open to non-majors. Please contact the cluster coordinator.
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 330: Nineteenth Century Art
AH 331: History of Photography
AH 332: Modern Art
AH 333: Modern Russian Art
AH 334: Soviet and Post-Soviet Art
*AH 335: Theories of Modernism [ART 195, and art, or art history, or studio art, or graphic design major, or art, or art history, or graphic design minor]
AH 336: Art of Fashion
AH 340: Contemporary Art: 1945 to 1970
AH 341: Contemporary Art: 1970 to the Present
CCI 100: Introduction to Creative and Cultural Industries
CCI 202: Popular Culture
ENG 223: Literature III (1800 CE – Present)
ENG 238: British Literature II
ENG 252: Introduction to Poetry
ENG 339: World Literature from 1800 to the Present [ENG 256]
GD 304: History of Graphic Design [GD 200, 201, and graphic design major, or minor, or consent of instructor]
FS 244: History of Film to 1959
FS 245: History of Film 1960 to Present [FS 244]
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 190: East Asia History and Popular Culture
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 311: Russian History
HIST 313: Modern British History
HIST 338 America After the War, 1945–1960
HIST 345: Popular Music, History, and Culture
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
HIST 365 Topics in the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 365)
HIST 366: Capitalism and the Modern World
HIST 388: Technology and Media in the United States
ITAL 341: Italian Cinema: Politics, Art, and Industry (cross listed with FS 443F)
PHIL 311: Descartes to Kierkegaard (cross listed with REL 311)
POSC 302: Modern Political Philosophy
TWP 246: History of Television [open to cluster students]

Modern History

Focus: This cluster contains courses that provide students with the historical understanding that can help them make sense of the modern world.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

HIST 103: United States History Survey II
HIST 112: Western Civilization: From the Reformation to Modern Times
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 190: From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern Asian History
HIST 202: Modern World Civilization
HIST 210: Modern Middle East History
HIST 220: The Vietnam Wars
HIST 224: United States Women's History
HIST 233: Disability and American Life
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 240: History of America through Sport
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 256: Film and American History
HIST 258: Latin American History Through Film
HIST 260: Asian History and Film
HIST 264: Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 275: Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 311: Russian History
HIST 313: Modern British History
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 333: Images of American History
HIST 336: Conflict and Change in America: 1920-1945
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 340: American Diplomatic History and Foreign Policy
HIST 342: The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life and Death
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in the East
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
HIST 365A: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365A)
HIST 365b: The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States
HIST 372: California History
HIST 388: Technology and Media in the United States

Multicultural Histories and Identities in the United States

Focus: The U.S. took shape as people from a variety of cultures and ethnicities came to this land, a place already peopled by Native Americans. This cluster allows students to examine the triumphs and tragedies of this influx by tracing the culture and history of this mix of people and considering the various meanings of the term "multicultural" today.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of English and Associate Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Narrative and Dramatic Literature

Focus: This cluster allows students to study the principles of storytelling in literature and drama.

Cluster Coordinator/email: English Department Chair, Associate Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to English, Theatre, and Screen Acting majors.

*Courses may not be available to non-majors. Check with the department.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ENG 204: Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 250: Introduction to Fiction
ENG 256: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism
ENG 260: Literature into Film
ENG 320: Topics in American Literature before 1870 [ENG 256]
ENG 325: Introduction to Shakespeare
ENG 327: Multicultural Literatures of the U.S. [ENG 256]
ENG 355: Theater in England (Travel course)
ENG 430: Shakespeare's Comedies and Histories [ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210]
ENG 432: Shakespeare’s Tragedies and Romances [ENG 256, or HIST 308, or TH 210]
ENG 441: Topics in Drama [ENG 256]
ENG 447: Topics in Comparative Literature [ENG 256]
TH 150: Theater in World Cultures
*TH 370: Script Analysis [TH 150, or 170, and sophomore standing]
*TH 371: Theatre History I-Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century [TH 170, or equivalent, and junior standing.]
*TH 372: Theatre History II-Eighteenth to Twentieth Centuries [TH 170, or equivalent, and junior standing.]
TH 373: Dramaturgy [TH 170 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.]
*TH 472: Dramatic Theory and Criticism [TH 371, 372, senior standing, and theatre, or theatre performance major, or consent of instructor.]

Philosophy, Knowledge, and Reality

Focus: Studying philosophy prepares you to think for yourself while learning from the insights of contemporary writers and great thinkers of the past. Enhance your appreciation of life by asking fundamental questions about reality, why God allows suffering, whether we are free or predetermined, how mind and body are related, the reliability of knowledge, the basis of scientific reasoning, and how to determine when reasoning is logical.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Philosophy Department Chair, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Dr. G. Michael Pace

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.
Restrictions: Not open to majors in Philosophy or Religious Studies.
 
Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.
 
PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 102: Philosophy Through Science Fiction
PHIL 125: Philosophy of Religion [cross listed with REL 125]
PHIL 203: Logic
PHIL 300: Symbolic Logic
PHIL 305: Metaphysics
PHIL 306: Games and Decisions
PHIL 307: History of Twentieth Century Philosophy
PHIL 309: Religion, Knowledge, and Evil (cross listed with REL 309)
PHIL 310: From Socrates to Aquinas (cross listed with REL 310)
PHIL 311: Descartes to Kierkegaard (cross listed with REL 311)
PHIL 320: Belief, Truth, and Knowledge
PHIL 321: Philosophy of Science
PHIL 322A: Philosophical Theology [cross listed with REL 322A]
PHIL 323: Philosophy in Literature
PHIL 340: Philosophy of Mind
PHIL 350: Philosophy of Quantum Theory
PHIL 365: Philosophy and Neuroscience of Free Will

Physics

Focus: Physics is the branch of science concerned with the fundamental laws of the universe. It deals with the elementary constituents of the universe—matter, energy, space, and time—and their interactions. Firmly grounded in observations and experiments, with a rich set of theories expressed in elegant mathematics, physics has made a multitude of contributions to philosophy, science, and technology. Students taking courses in this cluster will explore some of the most basic ways in which we comprehend the world in which we live.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Physics, Dr. Justin Dressel

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Physics.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take two core courses (either PHYS 101/PHYS 102 or PHYS 107/PHYS 108) plus two upper division courses. Prerequisites for each course are shown in brackets to help plan the sequence.

Core courses:

PHYS 101: General Physics I [MATH 115 or MATH 110. Corequisite: PHYS 101L.]
PHYS 102: General Physics II [PHYS 101, MATH 116, or MATH 111. Corequisite: PHYS 102L.]
PHYS 107: General Physics for the Life Sciences I, Lecture and Laboratory [MATH 110 or MATH 115, Corequisite, PHYS 107L]
PHYS 108: General Physics for the Life Sciences II, Lecture and Laboratory [MATH 111 or MATH 116, Corequisite, PHYS 108L]

Upper Division Courses:

PHYS 320: Mechanics I [PHYS 101, MATH 116 or 210, MATH 215 or 211]
PHYS 321: Mechanics II [PHYS 320]
PHYS 325: Biophysics [MATH 116 or MATH 111, PHYS 102 or PHYS 108]
PHYS 326: Cosmology [PHYS 101 and PHYS 102]
PHYS 340: Quantum Information Science [MATH 215 or MATH 211, CPSC 230]
PHYS 350: Experimental Methods in Optics [PHYS 102, MATH 215]
PHYS 370: Special Topics in Physics [PHYS 101 and PHYS 102]
PHYS 421: Electricity and Magnetism I [PHYS 102, PHYS 250]
PHYS 422: Electricity and Magnetism II [PHYS 421]
PHYS 430: Thermodynamics I [PHYS 201, PHYS 250]
PHYS 431: Thermodynamics II [PHYS 430]
PHYS 451: Quantum Mechanics I [PHYS 201, PHYS 250]
PHYS 452: Quantum Mechanics II [PHYS 451]
PHYS 453: Foundations of Quantum Mechanics [MATH 215 or MATH 211]
PHYS 491: Student-Faculty Research / Creative Activity [PHYS 101 and PHYS 102]

Suggested Upper Division Sequences:

Mechanics Sequence: PHYS 320, PHYS 321
Quantum Information Sequence: PHYS 340, PHYS 453
Introductory Physics Sequence: PHYS 320, PHYS 421
Electricity and Magnetism Sequence: PHYS 421, PHYS 422
Quantum Mechanics Sequence: PHYS 451, PHYS 452
Thermodynamics Sequence: PHYS 430, PHYS 431
Biophysics Sequence: PHYS 325, PHYS 430

Pre-Modern History

Focus: This cluster allows students to study the pre-modern era, defined by different chronological criteria in different societies, across different cultures and societies.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Requirements: Not open to majors in History

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.
GRK 101: Elementary Classical Greek
GRK 102: Elementary Classical Greek II [GRK 101]
HIST 110: Western Civilization: From Mesopotamia to the Renaissance
HIST 160: African Voices: African History to 1800
HIST 190: From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 201: The Rise of World Civilizations
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 275: Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with REL 304)
HIST 306: The Middle Ages (cross listed with REL 306)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with REL 315)
HIST 319: Israel/Palestine: 3000 Years (cross listed with POSC 319 and PCST 319)
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: The Bonfires of Change
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
LAT 101: Elementary Latin I
LAT 102: Elementary Latin II [LAT 101]

Race and Ethnicity

Focus: This cluster considers the historical and contemporary experiences of major racial and ethnic groups in the United States and diverse and multicultural societies around the world through interdisciplinary lenses. Courses include examination of key theoretical perspectives on race and ethnicity.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Religion and the Arts

Focus: This cluster considers the intersection of the fields of religion and art with the historic, cultural, and linguistic disciplines as well as with the creative expressions of literature, music, dance, theater, film, and graphic arts. Many of these disciplines find their origin and some of their finest manifestation in religious expression. This cluster emphasizes the shared experience of artists and spiritual sojourners, their search for self, truth, interpretation of the world, and the desire for transcendence. Required is a fundamental understanding of the nature of religion and the spiritual experience, along with the development of critical thinking, especially the norms for understanding and critiquing artistic expressions.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of Religious Studies, Dr. Nancy Martin, Associate Professor and Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

 Restrictions: Not open to Religious Studies majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

AH 200: Ancient to Medieval Art
AH 202: Art of India, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia
AH 203: Exchange and Evolution in the Arts of China and Japan
AH 322: Baroque Art
DANC 353: Dance in World Cultures 
ENG 242: World Literature from 400–1600 CE
ENG 320: Topics in American Literature before 1870 [ENG 256]
ENG 340: The Bible as Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures [Written Inquiry course] (cross listed with REL 340)
ENG 341: The Bible as Literature: The Christian Scriptures [Written Inquiry course] (cross listed with REL 341) (core course) 
FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FS 444G: Films About the Holocaust
HIST 252: History and Film
HIST 365B: The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories
MUS 101: Introduction to Music (core course)
MUS 122: Musical Cultures of the World
PHIL 323: Philosophy in Literature
REL 150: The Bible and Popular Culture: Engaging the Sacred Text
REL 204: Mesopotamian Myths and Rituals
REL 214: Introduction to Christianity
REL 312: Religious Experience in Film and Fiction (core course)
REL 314: Fiction, Film and the Western Contemplative Tradition (core course)
REL 315: Archaeology of Ancient Israel (cross listed with HIST 315)
REL 340: The Bible as Literature: The Hebrew Scriptures [Written Inquiry course] (cross listed with ENG 340)
REL 341: The Bible as Literature: The Christian Scriptures [Written Inquiry course] (cross listed with ENG 341) (core course)
REL 365: Topics in the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 365)
REL 366: The Latino/a Religious Experience: From Colonialism to Liberation
SPAN 375: Literature and Culture of Spain I [SPAN 326, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 376: Literature and Culture of Spain II [SPAN 326, or consent of instructor]
TH 150: Theatre in World Cultures

ROTC Cluster

Focus: Students who participate in either the Air Force ROTC or the Army ROTC at partner institutions and complete the below courses satisfy the Inter/Multidisciplinary Cluster portion of the GE program. Students must complete the specific program requirements listed below to fulfill the GE I/M Cluster.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Assistant Registrar, Patricia Isaac Michelsen

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. Courses are considered transfer credit and subject to all transfer policies. Additional transfer credit outside of the ROTC program beyond transfer limit policy will not be permitted.

Courses: All four courses from either ROTC option must be completed with the grade of C- or higher.*

CSU San Bernardino Air Force ROTC
AS 203: Air Force Ethics
AS 303: Air Force Leadership and Management III
AS 403: National Security Force in Contemporary American Society III

CSU Fullerton Army ROTC Advanced Courses Instruction
MLSC 301: Adaptive Tactical Leadership
MLSC 302: Leadership in Changing Environments
MLSC 401: Developmental Leadership
MLSC 402: Adaptive Leadership

USC Air Force ROTC
AEST 300A: Air Force Management and Leadership
AEST 300B: Air Force Management and Leadership
AEST 400A: National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society
AEST 400B: National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society

*Once the cluster is formally declared, it is recommended that the student submit official transcripts upon completion of each course in the sequence. Students are responsible for meeting all ROTC program requirements established by the partner institution in addition to the specific courses listed here.

Social History

Focus: This cluster contains courses that emphasize the experiences of ordinary people in history and how they served as agents of historical change.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America (cross listed with PCST 366)
HIST 160: African Voices: African History to 1800
HIST 180: Modern Latin American History
HIST 190: From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 200: A History of Sexuality
HIST 202: Modern World Civilizations
HIST 210: Modern Middle East History (cross listed with POSC 210)
HIST 221: Native American History: The Struggle to be Heard
HIST 223: The Sixties
HIST 224: U.S. Women's History
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HIST 233: Disability and American Life
HIST 234: 3000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 240: History of America through Sport
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 264: Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 275: Iran/Iraq: A Parallel History
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 301: U.S. Environmental History
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World (cross listed with REL 304)
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 311: Russian History
HIST 312: Spain and Portugal
HIST 313: Modern British History
HIST 315: Archaeology of Ancient History (cross listed with REL 315)
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 319: Israel/Palestine: 3,000 Years (cross listed with POSC 319 and PCST 319)
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 333: Images of American History
HIST 336: Conflict and Change in America: 1920-1945
HIST 342: The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life, and Death
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States
HIST 371: U.S. Business and Entrepreneurial History (cross listed with ECON 371)
HIST 373: U.S. Economic History (cross listed with ECON 373)
HIST 388: Technology and Media in the United States
HIST 392: Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin America

Social Service

Focus: This cluster is designed to introduce and provide a broad orientation to students who may be interested in a career in the helping professions. The underlying premise is that one must have an understanding of the worldviews of the clientele to be served as well as those of the various professions involved in delivering social services. It also is designed to provide a working definition of the logistics of the professions involved.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology: Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. (Note: majors in Sociology will have limited course selections because they may not choose SOC classes.)

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

Spanish Language and Linguistics

Focus: Students will increase their competency in Spanish and achieve a basic understanding of human language. Using Spanish as the main resource, students will identify and describe structural patterns, understand sociolinguistic variation, and become more aware of the complex interconnections between language, culture, identity, and power.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Pilar Valenzuela

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Spanish

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take at least one Linguistics course (SPAN 396, SPAN 440, or SPAN 441) is required; more than one is recommended.

SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II [SPAN 201]
SPAN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 344: Spanish Writing Workshop [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 345: Spanish Conversation [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [any 300-level Spanish course]
SPAN 441: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]

Technology, Science, and Society

Focus: Because the rapid pace of scientific progress risks widening the gap between knowledgeable scientists and uninformed citizens, responsible citizens must understand science in order to consider the social and ethical implications of scientific developments. Students taking courses in this cluster will explore the nature of scientific knowledge, understand current findings in science, especially those relating to genetics and the environment, and grapple with their ethical and social implications.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, Dr. Jason Keller

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Philosophy majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Prerequisites appear in brackets.

CHEM 101: Chemistry of Life
CHEM 105: Chemistry of Environmental Issues  
CPSC: 285: Social and Ethical Issues in Computing [CPSC 230]
PHIL 303: Environmental Ethics  
PHIL 306: Games and Decisions  
PHIL 314: Medical Ethics  
PHIL 340: Philosophy of Mind  
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101, or ENV 102, or consent of instructor]

University Honors Cluster - 2018-2019 Catalog

Focus: This cluster for Honors Program students immerses them in interdisciplinary studies, covering the arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and history. Students must complete the Honors Program to fulfill the GE I/M Cluster.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Director, Honors Program; Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Philosophy, Dr. Carmichael Peters

Restrictions: Honors Program students.

Courses: Eight courses must be completed to graduate in the Honors program: six courses plus the three credit Honors Forum (during the first year in the program) and the three credit Honors Capstone in the senior year. Of the six courses, at least one course must be taken in each of the three main categories (human sciences, natural sciences, social sciences). Transfer students with 60 credits or more prior to matriculation must complete five courses to graduate in the Honors program: three courses plus Honors Forum (during their first year in the program) and the Honors Capstone in the senior year. Of the three courses, one of each must be taken in each of the three main categories. Nine credits, other than the capstone seminar, must be at the 300 level or above. Courses under multiple categories can only be assigned to one category.
  • 2018-19 Catalog: 6 courses (must include 1 from each of the 3 Honors core areas); plus Honors Forum and Honors Capstone. 24 credits
  • 2012-2013 Catalog: 7 courses (must include 1 from each of the 3 Honors core areas); plus Honors Forum and Honors Capstone. 25 credits

Human Sciences
HON 202: On Being Ethical in the World
HON 207: Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory: The Science and the Controversy
HON 209: Death, Self and Society
HON 210: Monsters and Monstrosities
HON 215: Art and Anthropology
HON 216: Twilight of the Gods
HON 218: Social Movement of the Sixties
HON 220: Disney: Gender, Race and Religion
HON 222: Honors Composition: Rhetorical Agency Across Genres
HON 240: Anime and War
HON 242: Beyoncé, Madonna, Nina Simone
HON 266: Sound and Spirit
HON 277: Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall
HON 282: Evolution, Morality, and Ethics
HON 288: Close Reading
HON 292: The Art of Revenge
HON 313: Golden Opportunities: Immigration and the Arts in Southern California, 1900-1950
HON 314: Dante’s Afterlife
HON 315: Power and Imagination in the Italian Renaissance
HON 317: Visual Literacy in a Generation of Visible Surplus: Its Theory, Practice and Applications
HON 324: Modern Political Argument
HON 327: Revolution and Philosophy
HON 329: Experimental Course
HON 333: Creativity and the Human Condition
HON 334: Rhetoric of the Western World
HON 335: The Enigma of Being Awake: Zen Buddhism
HON 338: Thana Tourism: Traveling the “Dark Side”
HON 344: Illustrating History/the World: Graphic Memoirs, Novels, and Reportage
HON 347: Listening to Time: Area Studies in Ethnomusicology
HON 359: Fundamentals of Deductive and Inductive Logic
HON 360: Performing America(s): Celebrating American Identities
HON 362: Philosophical Themes in the Films of Ingmar Bergman
HON 363: The Castaway Narrative in World Literature
HON 367: Pythagoras Revisited: A Quest for Interior Precision
HON 371: The World of Fellini's Cinema
HON 373: The Puppet Metaphor Across Media
HON 376: Sustainability in Unsustainably Structured World
HON 377: Critical Animal Studies
HON 379: Philosophy through Film
HON 381: Think for Yourself: From Socrates to Adorno
HON 385: Is Big Data Enough? To be human among machines
HON 396: The Politics of Waste
HON 409: Hermes Unbound: Divining Hermeneutics
HON 412: “Seas of Stories:” Postcolonial Literature and Theory
HON 416: Sex, Self, Society
HON 418: Critical Pedagogy: Teaching to Transgress
HON 419: The Search for an American Voice: Huck Finn to Harlem
HON 424: Magic, the Occult and Art in Early Modern Period
HON 432: Queer Theory
HON 440: Up
HON 447 The “Real” Westeros: Game of Thrones and Northern Ireland
HON 455 Interpreting the Past: An Experience of Italy

Natural Sciences
HON 207: Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory: The Science and the Controversy
HON 208: Universal Geometry
HON 254: Symmetry
HON 286: Origins
HON 310: Experiencing Forms and Colors: Goethe’s Approach to Science
HON 329: Experimental Course
HON 350: Scientific Prediction: Information, Technology and Progress
HON 354: Origin and Evolution of the Univerrse and Life
HON 364: Biology in Media and Reality
HON 367: Pythagoras Revisited: A Quest for Interior Precision
HON 375: Environmental and Social Cost of Coffee
HON 376: Sustainability in Unsustainably Structured World
HON 378: The Ecology, History, and Politics of California Ecosystem
HON 382: The Fabric of the Universe: Space, Time, and Reality
HON 383: Controversial Topics in Biology
HON 384: Ethical Implications of Biotechnology
HON 385: Is Big Data Enough? To be human among machines
HON 389: The Science Blender
HON 392: Adventures in Cosmologies
HON 395H: Newton and the Scientific Revolution
 
Social Sciences
HON 206: Media, Self and Society
HON 209: Death, Self and Society
HON 210: Monsters and Monstrosities
HON 215: Art and Anthropology
HON 218: Social Movement in the Sixties
HON 220: Disney: Gender, Race and Religion
HON 240: Anime and War
HON 266: Sound and Spirit
HON 275: Thinking and Risk Taking Outside the Box
HON 277: Game of Thrones: Beyond the Wall
HON 308: Consciousness and Cognition
HON 311: Ethnicity, Race and Nationalism
HON 313: Golden Opportunities: Immigration and the Arts in Southern California, 1900-1950
HON 314: Dante’s Afterlife
HON 315: Power and Imagination in the Italian Renaissance
HON 324: Modern Political Argument
HON 327: Revolution and Philosophy
HON 329: Experimental Course
HON 338: Thana Tourism: Traveling the “Dark Side”
HON 344: Illustrating History/the World: Graphic Memoirs, Novels, and Reportage
HON 345: Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy
HON 360: Performing America(s): Celebrating American Identities
HON 373: The Puppet Metaphor Across Media
HON 375: Environmental and Social Cost of Coffee
HON 376: Sustainability in an Unsustainably Structured World
HON 377: Critical Animal Studies
HON 378: The Ecology, History, and Politics of California Ecosystems
HON 385: Is Big Data Enough? To be human among machines
HON 392: Adventures in Cosmologies
HON 393: Tricksters and Cosmopolitans
HON 395H: Newton and the Scientific Revolution
HON 396: Politics of Waste 
HON 412: “Seas of Stories”: Postcolonial Literature and Theory
HON 416: Sex, Self, Society
HON 418: Critical Pedagogy: Teaching to Transgress
HON 424: Magic, the Occult, and Art in Early Modern Period
HON 432: Queer Theory
HON 455: Interpreting the Past: An Experience of Italy
HON 477: The “Real” Westeros: Game of Thrones and Northern Ireland

Other Categories
HON 255: Serving to Learn: Learning to Serve
HON 280: Honors Forum
HON 329: Experimental Course
HON 395: Topics in Honors
HON 399: Individual Study
HON 498: Honors Capstone Seminar
HON 499: Individual Study

War and Society

Focus: This cluster allows students to explore the history of warfare in world history and its impact on society.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of History, Dr. Alexander Bay

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to History majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

HIST 211: Mother Russia and Uncle Sam During the Cold War: Conflict and Coexistence
HIST 220: The Vietnam Wars
HIST 223: The Sixties
HIST 234: 3,000 Years of Jewish History
HIST 255: From Kabbalah to Hummus: Jewish History since 1500
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 264: Empire and War in East Asia: History and Memory
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 305: Daily Life in Modern Europe
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 319: Israel/Palestine: 3000 Years (cross listed with POSC 319 and PCST 319)
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: The Bonfires of Change
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 338: America After the War, 1945-1960
HIST 340: American Diplomatic History and Foreign Policy
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
HIST 357: History of Jewish Migration
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napoleon to Hitler
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution
HIST 365A: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365A)
HIST 365B: The Holocaust: Memoirs and Histories
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States

Women's and Gender Studies

Focus: This cluster provides an overview of interdisciplinary approaches to understanding women's history, gender roles, feminism, and gender issues in contemporary society. Students in this cluster can explore fundamental questions about women and the roles of women and men, and learn more about what makes us human--our differences and similarities, the way gender helps to shape our lives, and how cultures view "gender."

Cluster Coordinator/email: Instructor of Sociology, Dr. CK Magliola

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must select at least three courses from the core list and a fourth from the core or secondary list. 

Core list:
ANTH 300: Queer Anthropology
ART 344: Performance Art [ART 325 or consent of instructor]
COM 311: Gender and Communication
ENG 445: Major Authors: Virginia Woolf/Jane Austen [ENG 256]
ENG 472: Film, Gender, Sexuality [pre-req: written inquiry]
FREN 386: Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
HIST 224: United States Women's History
HUM 200: Women's Realities
LEAD 315: The Multicultural Organization: Gender and Diversity Issues in the Workplace [Prerequisite, admission to the Leadership Studies Program, or declared cluster in leadership, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 396: Gender and Leadership [LEAD 101, or 301, or 414, or consent of instructor]
MUS 202: Music and Gender
PHIL 319: Philosophy of Women/Women of Color
POSC 318: Women and Politics
REL 316: Genesis and Gender
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 333: Religion and Gender in Harry Potter
SOC 204: Marriage and the Family
SOC 281: Sociology of Sex and Gender
SOC 310: Feminist-Art-Theory-Power [SOC 101, WMST 101, or consent of instructor] (cross-listed with WMST 310)
SOC 347: Postcolonial Women Writers
SOC 350: Gender, Stratification, and Globalization [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
SOC 371: Sociology of Sexuality
WMST 101: Introduction to Women's Studies
WMST 310: Feminist-Art-Theory-Power [SOC 101, or WMST 101] (cross-listed with SOC 310)


Students have the option of taking one of their four courses from the following: 
ENG 347: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Literature of the LBGTQ Experiences [ENG 256]
HUM 205: Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Studies 
PSY 340: Human Sexuality  [PSY 101]
PSY 344: Psychology of Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation