» Social and Cultural Studies

+ - American Society and Culture

Focus: The United States offers a fascinating case study of the triumphs and struggles of a nation building its own identity. Able to choose from cultural, political, economic and social models already in place throughout the world, Americans made crucial decisions regarding our values, goals, and character that continue to shape our identity today. This cluster will provide an opportunity for students to examine the myriad factors that shape the dynamic society and culture of the United States and to examine critically its role in the world today.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of History, and Professor of History, Dr. Jennifer Keene

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be at the upper division. Students take two courses from each of the two subdivisions.

Cultural Studies:
ANTH 372: Images of American Indians
ANTH 396: Indians of California
ENG 320: American Literature before 1870 [ENG 256]
ENG 326: Topics in American Literature [ENG 256]
ENG 327: Multicultural Literatures of the U.S. [ENG 256]
FS 342A-J: Film Genre Studies (all topics)
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with POSC 352)
POSC 317: Media and Politics
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity

Historical Perspectives:
HIST 101: United States History Survey I
HIST 103: United States History Survey II
HIST 211: Mother Russia and Uncle Sam During the Cold War: Conflict and Coexistence
HIST 221: Native American History
HIST 224: U.S. Women’s History
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HIST 256: Film and American History
HIST 301: U.S. Environmental History
HIST 317: Migration in World History
HIST 326: African-American History
HIST 328: American Colonial History
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: The Bonfires of Change
HIST 332: Slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 333: Images of History
HIST 336: Conflict and Change in America: 1920-1945
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 338: America After the War, 1945-1960
HIST 342: Everyday Life in American History
HIST 347A: Topics in Transformative Encounters: African in America [consent of instructor]
HIST 369: History of Terrorism in the United States
HIST 371: U.S. Business and Entrepreneurial History [cross listed with ECON 371]
HIST 372: California History
HIST 373: U.S. Economic History [cross listed with ECON 373]
POSC 110: Introduction to American Politics
POSC 300: American Political Thought

+ - Business and Economics Cluster

Focus: This cluster is designed to introduce students to the essential concepts of business and economics.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Programs, Dr. Scott Browne

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Accounting, Business, or Economics majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

BUS 100: Introduction to Business
BUS 110: Accounting and Finance for Non-Majors
ECON 200: Principles of Microeconomics [MATH 099, or equivalent]
ECON 201: Principles of Macroeconomics [MATH 099, or equivalent]
ECON 350: Intermediate Microeconomics Theory [ECON 200 ,201, and MATH 109, or 110, or MGSC 208]
ECON 351: Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory [ECON 200, 201, and MATH 109, or 110, or MGSC 208]
ECON 441: Economic Development [ECON 200, 201]
ECON 452: Econometrics [ECON 200, 201, and MATH 109, or 110, or MGSC 208, and MGSC 209, or MATH 203, and business administration, or economics major, or computational science, or economics, or mathematics minor]
FIN 207: Personal Finance [Quantitative Inquiry course]
MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
MKTG 305: Fundamentals of Marketing for Non-Majors
REAL 370: Principles of Real Estate [ECON 200]

+ - Cross Cultural Studies

Focus: This cluster is designed to provide the student with differential worldviews as expressed in culture, the arts, and societal institutions. Courses in the cluster provide a broad overview of how societies across the globe translate their mores, values, arts, and priorities into functioning realities. The cluster courses illustrate the unique and creative ways cultures evolve solutions to problems we all confront to some degree.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ANTH 102: Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 296: Indians and Film
ART 374: Change and Exchange in the Contemporary Arts of China, Korea and Japan
ART 375: Change and Exchange in the Contemporary Arts of South Asia, the Middle East and Southeast Asia
COM 211: Intercultural Communication
DANC 353: Dance in World Cultures
ENG 302: Writing About Diverse Cultures [written inquiry course]
ENG 449: Literature in Translation [Written Inquiry course]
ENG 462: The Literature and Film of Diverse Cultures [ENG 256]
MUS 122: Musical Cultures of the World [non-music major, or minor]
POSC 130: Introduction to Comparative Politics
POSC 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (cross listed with PCST 251)
REL 336: Buddhism
SOC 332: Crime, Justice, and Globalization
SOC 404: Global Family Systems [SOC 101]
TH 150: Theatre in World Cultures

+ - The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Focus: This cluster explores genocide and its causes; social, legal, and political responses to genocide; the historical and social context of genocide; and the depiction of genocide in literature, with special focus upon a comparative examination of the Holocaust and subsequent acts of genocide.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of History, and Professor of History, Dr. Jennifer Keene

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History, Political Science, Peace Studies, or Religious Studies.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students are required to take the following core courses: HIST 170; HIST 307; POSC 251 or POSC 323 or POSC 328; and one other course from the cluster.

FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
HIST 170: Why Africa Matters: African History 1800 - Present (core)
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust (core, cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 310: Modern Europe
HIST 337: World War II
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
POSC 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (core, cross listed with PCST 251)
POSC 323: Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity (core, cross listed with PCST 323)
POSC 328: Human Rights Law (core, cross listed with PCST 328)

+ - Law and Public Policy

Focus: This cluster is designed for pre-law students to expose them to questions of the law and policy. Cluster courses are liberal-arts-based and examine law in the context of the larger social and political framework in which laws are made and enforced, bridging courses in the major and the professional law school curriculum.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to Political Science majors; cross-listed courses are not open to Peace Studies majors as cluster options.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. It is strongly suggested that students seeking to complete this cluster enroll in POSC 110: Introduction to American Politics and/or POSC 120: Introduction to International Relations prior to taking these following courses.

POSC 309: Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society
POSC 320: International Law, International Organization, and World Order (cross listed with PCST 320)
POSC 323: Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity (cross listed with PCST 323)
POSC 328: Human Rights Law (cross listed with PCST 328)
POSC 341: The First Amendment
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 373: Separation of Powers and Public Policy
POSC 374: Environmental Politics and Policy (cross listed with ENV 374)
POSC 375: Public Policy Process [ENV 102, or POSC 110] (cross listed with ENV 375)
POSC 439: Disability and the Law (cross listed with PCST 439)

+ - Law and Social Control

Focus: This cluster deals with the concept of law and social control from a broad interdisciplinary approach, encompassing both formal and informal mechanisms of social control.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Sociology

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take at least two courses from the Sociology offerings.

ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas (same as ANTH 330)
ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America (cross listed with PCST 366)
PHIL 318: Political and Legal Philosophy
SOC 211: Social Problems [SOC 101]
SOC 330: Foundations of Criminal Justice [SOC 101]
SOC 332: Crime, Justice and Globalization
SOC 350: Gender in a Global Perspective [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
SOC 383: Sociology of Deviant Behavior [SOC 101]
SOC 393: Child Abuse [SOC 101]
SOC 410: Victimless Crimes [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]

+ - Leadership and Communication Studies

Focus: This cluster enables students to develop their understanding of leadership and examine the relationship between leadership and effective communication. Students may explore leadership communications in an area of personal and/or professional interest (for example, political communication, business communication in the global marketplace, conflict and negotiation).

Cluster Coordinator/email: Director, Leadership Studies Program; Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Education, Dr. Mark Maier

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Communication Studies or Strategic Communications

Courses: Students choose four of the following, at least one of which is in Leadership (LEAD) and at least one in Communication Studies (COM).  Up to 2 courses may be drawn from the over 50 “Satellite/Leadership-related” electives listed below. At least two courses must be at the upper division level. (Note: The listing of a course here does not guarantee admission or access to the course. Programs reserve the right to restrict admission to selected courses to students in their programs. Students may NOT apply courses from their major discipline towards the cluster.)

Section I: Leadership Courses: Take at least ONE of the following):
LEAD 101: Introduction to Leadership: Principles & Practices
LEAD 301: Theory and Practice of Leadership [leadership minor, or cluster, or consent of instructor, or program coordinator]
LEAD 314: Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 315: The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity in the Workplace [admission to the Leadership Studies Program, or declared cluster in leadership, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion & Service [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of the instructor]
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 396: Gender & Leadership [LEAD 101, or 301, or 414, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 429: Experimental Course [LEAD 101, or leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 475: Introduction to Students Affairs in Higher Education [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or integrated educational studies major, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action, Independent Internship
LEAD 495: Special Topics in Leadership & Organization Studies [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 499: Individual Study [junior standing, consent of instructor, and leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster]

Section II Communication Courses: (Take at least ONE from the list below):
COM 101: Public Speaking
COM 151: Mass Communication
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion for Non-Majors
COM 211: Intercultural Communication
COM 310: Business and Professional Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 311: Gender and Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 329: Experimental Course
COM 493: Ethical Controversies in Communication [COM 100, or consent of instructor]

Section III  Electives in Leadership and/or Communication-Related Courses
(Any TWO of the following and/or any of the above LEAD and COM, as available):
ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas (same as ANTH 330)
ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America (cross listed with PCST 366)
BUS 486: Business Across Cultures [ECON 200, 201]
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs
HIST 297: the Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: Bonfires of Change
HIST 347: Topics in Transformative Encounters
HIST 353: The Atlantic Slave Trade
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 365: Topics in the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 365)
HIST 365A: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365A)
IES 101: Self and Identity
IES 102: The Social Construction of Difference
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping
IES 300: Valuing Differences in American Society
IES 301: Organizations, Ethics and Society
IES 302 Information, Communication and Management: Theoretical and Practical Issues
MGMT 360: Human Resources Management [MGMT 316]
MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
MGMT 379: From Idea to Business: Student Incubator [MGMT 365]
MGMT 480: Human Behavior in Organizations [MGMT 316]
MGMT 485: Seminar in Business Consulting [MGMT 316]
PCST 150: Introduction to Peace Studies
PCST 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (cross listed with POSC 251)
PCST 253: Mediation and Conflict Resolution (cross listed with POSC 453)
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (POSC 352)
PCST 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross listed with POSC 353)
PCST 354: Nonviolent Social Change (cross listed with POSC 354)
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (cross listed with PCST 325 and REL 325)
POSC 304: Citizenship in Theory and Practice
POSC 310: The Presidency
POSC 318: Women and Politics
POSC 332: Democracy and Democratization (cross listed with PCST 332)
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
POSC 376: Organization Theory [POSC 110 or consent of instructor]
POSC 486: Political Leadership
REL 217: The Holocaust and Religious Faith
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 307)
REL 322: Topics in Theology
REL 322A: Philosophical Theology (cross listed with PHIL 322A)
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 375: Violence and Nonviolence in Society and Religion
SOC 306: Social Movements [SOC 101]
SOC 310: Feminist Art-Theory-Power (cross listed with WMST 310)
SOC 326: Mind, Self and Society in Tibetan Buddhism
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101, or ENV 102, or consent of instructor]
SOC 345: Social Psychology [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]
SOC 346: Solving Social Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country [one year of college Spanish language studies or equivalent]
SOC 350: Gender in a Global Perspective [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]

As of June 1, 2017, the following courses are inactive and no longer available for selection in this cluster:
PCST 450: Conflict Resolution: Advanced Theory and Practice
SOC 300: Society, Organizations and Leadership
SOC 325: Social Change [SOC 101]

+ - Leadership, Organizations and Society

Focus: Introduces students to leadership-related concepts from across the disciplines with over 70 courses to choose from. Students develop leadership insights and skills to enhance their interpersonal effectiveness in both personal life and professional/work situations, with a focus on promoting positive change in organizations and/or society. Theoretical models are often reinforced through experiential learning, linking theory and practice. The cluster allows students to connect in meaningful ways with colleagues throughout the university.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Director, Leadership Studies Program and Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Education, Dr. Mark Maier

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. (However, students may NOT apply courses from their major discipline* towards the cluster. Note that COM and SCC are the same discipline.)

Courses: Choose four courses from the following lists, two of which must be upper division. At least one 3-credit course in Leadership from teh first list must be selected. (Note: the listing of a course here does not guarantee admission or access to the course. Programs reserve the right to restrict admission to selected courses or students in their programs.

Leadership courses: Student must take at least one LEAD course (3 credits) from the list below:
LEAD 101: Introduction to Leadership: Principles & Practices
LEAD 301: Theory and Practice of Leadership
LEAD 314: Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others
LEAD 315: The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity in the Workplace
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion & Service
LEAD 360: Sports in Contemporary Society: A Leadership Perspective
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility
LEAD 396: Gender & Leadership [LEAD 101, or 301, or 414, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 414: Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work [leadership studies minor, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 475: Introduction to Students Affairs in Higher Education
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study

Electives: Leadership-related courses: Students may take up to three courses from the list below:
ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas (same as ANTH 330)
ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America  (cross listed with PCST 366)
ART 376: Artist as Leaders: Creating Art, Creating Change
BUS 486: Business Across Cultures
[ECON 200, ECON 201]
COM 101: Public Speaking
COM 110: Interpersonal Communication
COM 151: Mass Communication
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion for Non-Majors

COM 211: Intercultural Communication
COM 329: Experimental Course
COM 493: Ethical Controversies in Communication
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
HIST 297: The Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 307: Germany and the Holocaust
(cross listed with REL 307)
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: Bonfires of Change
HIST 347: Topics in Transformative Encounters
HIST 353: Slavery and Slave Trade in an Atlantic World
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 365A: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
IES 101: Self and Identity
IES 102: The Social Construction of Difference
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping
IES 300: Valuing Diversity in American Society
IES 301: Organizations, Ethics & Society
MGMT 316: Principles of Management [ACTG 210, ECON 200, 201, and MATH 109, or 110, or MGSC 208]
MGMT 360: Human Resources Management [MGMT 316]
MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
MGMT 480: Human Behavior in Organizations [MGMT 316]
MGMT 485: Seminar in Business Consulting [MGMT 316]
NWD 321: The Documentary Tradition
NWD 341: Investigative Journalism [NWD 116, and news and documentary, or television writing and production major, or documentary film minor]
NWD 375: International Documentary Pre-Production [application, interview, consent of instructor]
NWD 380: Community Voices: Documentary Workshop [consent of instructor]
NWD 389: Cross-Cultural Documentary [consent of instructor]
PCST 150: Introduction to Peace Studies
PCST 239: People with Disabilities in Politics and Society (cross listed with POSC 239)
PCST 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication
(cross listed with POSC 251)
PCST 253: Mediation and Conflict Resolution (same as PCST 453)
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with POSC 352)
PCST 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross listed with POSC 353)
PCST 354: Nonviolent Social Change (cross listed with POSC 354)
PCST 450: Conflict Resolution: Advanced Theory and Practice
PHIL 120: Global Ethics and Religion (cross listed with REL 120)
PHIL 303: Environmental Ethics
PHIL 314: Medical Ethics
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
POSC 130: Introduction to Comparative Politics
POSC 212: Introduction to Public Administration
POSC 304: Citizenship in Theory and Practice
POSC 309: Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society

POSC 310: The Presidency
POSC 318: Women and Politics
POSC 332: Democracy and Democratization
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
POSC 376: Organization Theory
POSC 486: Political Leadership
REL 217: The Holocaust and Religious Faith
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 322A: Philosophical Theology (Same as PHIL 322A)
REL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (Same as PCST 325 and PHIL 325)
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 375: Violence and Nonviolence in Society and Religion
SOC 300: Society, Organizations and Leadership
SOC 306: Social Movements
SOC 310: Feminist Art-Theory-Power (cross listed with WMST 310) [SOC 101, or WMST 101]
SOC 325: Social Change [SOC 101]
SOC 326: Mind, Self and Society in Tibetan Buddhism
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101, or ENV 102, or consent of instructor]
SOC 345: Social Psychology [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
SOC 346: Solving Social Problems in Costa Rica [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
SOC 350: Gender in a Global Perspective [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]
WMST 300: Women in Leadership

Students may also propose additional/appropriate options to the cluster coordinator for consideration.

(The following courses may count when they contain a substantial Leadership, Organizations and Society component and they must have the cluster coordinator's approval.)
HIST 347: Topics in Transformative Encounters
HIST 365: Topics in the Holocaust
LEAD 429: Experimental Course
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action, Internship
LEAD 495: Selected Topics in Leadership & Organization Studies
LEAD 499: Individual Study
MGMT 495: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

 

+ - Media, Culture and Society

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to study the symbiotic relationship between media and social, political and cultural institutions.

Cluster Coordinator/email: English Department Chair and Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Communication or Strategic and Corporate Communication.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

COM 151: Mass Communication
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion
COM 251: Issues in Mass Communication
DOC 321: The Documentary Tradition
ENG 206: Critical Literacies and Community Writing

ENG 215: Theory and Practice of Journalism [Corequisite, ENG 215L]
ENG 371: Discourse Analysis
ENG 372: Language and Ideology
ENG 472: Film, Gender, Sexuality
ITAL 341: Italian Cinema: Politics, Art, and Industry (cross listed with FS 443F)
POSC 110: Introduction to American Politics
POSC 317: Media and Politics
PRA 230: Principles of Advertising
PRA 231: Principles of Public Relations
SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
TWP 240: The Business of Television
TWP 246: History of Television
TWP 265: Prime Time: The Game of Television

+ - Multicultural Histories and Identities in the United States

Focus: The U.S. took shape as people from a variety of cultures and ethnicities came to this land, a place already peopled by Native Americans. This cluster allows students to examine the triumphs and tragedies of this influx by tracing the culture and history of this mix of people and considering the various meanings of the term "multicultural" today.

Cluster Coordinator/email:  Chair, Department of English and Associate Professor of English, Dr. Joanna Levin

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in History.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ANTH 372: Images of American Indians
ANTH 396: Indians of California
ENG 327: Multicultural Literatures of the U.S. [ENG 256]
HIST 221: Native American History: The Struggle to be Heard
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HIST 326: The African-American Historical Experience
HIST 372: California History
IES 300: Valuing Differences in American Society
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with POSC 352)

+ - Race and Ethnicity

Focus: This cluster considers the historical and contemporary experiences of major racial and ethnic groups in the United States and diverse and multicultural societies around the world through interdisciplinary lenses. Courses include examination of key theoretical perspectives on race and ethnicity.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology, Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ANTH 102: Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 363: African-Caribbean History and Culture [SOC 101, or ANTH 102]
ANTH 397: Cultural Mythology
DANC 353: Dance in World Cultures
ENG 302: Writing about Diverse Cultures
HIST 221: Native American History: the Struggle to be Heard
HIST 230: Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865
HIST 231: Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present
HUM 316: From Latin America to Los Angeles: Culture and Ways of Life
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with POSC 352)
POSC 327: Latin American Politics
POSC 337: Mexican Politics
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity [SOC 101]
SPAN 397: United States Latino Literature and Cultures [SPAN 326 or consent of instructor]

+ - Social Entrepreneurship and Leadership

Focus: This cluster provides students with an overview of the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship. More and more individuals are paying serious attention to what has been dubbed “the triple bottom line: People, Planet, Profits.” As many highly successful initiatives demonstrate (KIVA, Tom’s Shoes etc.), it is possible to do well by doing good. “Serving the needs of others,” as a prominent bust of A.P. Giannini on the Chapman campus reminds us, “is the only legitimate purpose of business today.” Applying one’s business acumen and leadership talents in the service of humanity is a way that Chapman students can take seriously their responsibility as global citizens motivated to make a positive difference in the world.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Director, Leadership Studies Program and Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Education, Dr. Mark Maier

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Business or Accounting.

Courses:  Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division level. (NOTE: The listing of a course here does not guarantee admission or access to the course. Programs reserve the right to restrict admission to selected courses to students in their programs.)

Must include at least TWO foundation courses (6 credits) from among the following:
BUS 486: Business Across Cultures [ECON 200, ECON 201]
HIST 273: Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping

IES 207: The Pursuit of Happiness and Knowledge: Disney and Darwin
IES 301: Organizations, Ethics and Society
IES 315: Non-Governmental Organizations: Policy and Practice
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion and Service
LEAD 414: Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work
*LEAD 499: Individual Study

MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
MGMT 369: Launching a New Venture: Shadowing a Startup [MGMT 365, or 437, or concurrent enrollment]
MGMT 437: Management of Entrepreneurial Enterprises [MGMT 316, MKTG 304, FIN 317]
MGMT 495: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship
PHIL 315: Voluntary Service
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (cross listed with PCST 325 and REL 325)
SOC 300: Society, Organizations, and Leadership

Must include at least ONE applied action course, from among the following:
*BUS 490: Independent Internship
*BUS 494: International Business Travel Course
*BUS 496: Special Topics in Business
DOC 380: Community Voices: Documentary Workshop
*IELP 401C: Individualized Experiential Learning Project (Citizenship rubric)
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum

LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action, Independent Internship
*LEAD 495: Selected Topics in Leadership and Organization Studies

*LEAD 499: Individual Study
MGMT 369: Launching a New Venture: Shadowing a Startup [MGMT 365, or 437, or concurrent enrollment]
MGMT 379: From Idea to Incubator: Student Incubator [MGMT 365, or 347, or consent of instructor]
PCST 354: Nonviolent Social Change (cross listed with POSC 354)
SOC 306: Social Movements [SOC 101]
SOC 325: Social Change [SOC 101]
SOC 326: Mind, Self, and Society in Tibetan Buddhism
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101, or ENV 102, or consent of instructor]
SOC 346: Solving Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country

ELECTIVE.  May include ONE elective from any of the above and/or the following:
BUS 486: Business Across Cultures [ECON 200, ECON 201]
COM 110: Interpersonal Communication
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion for Non-Majors
COM 212: Group Communication
DOC 380: Community Voices: Documentary Workshop
HIST 353: Slavery and Slave Trade in an Atlantic World

HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
MGMT 360: Human Resources Management [MGMT 316]
MGMT 480: Human Behavior in Organizations [MGMT 316]
MGMT 485: Seminar in Business Consulting [MGMT 316]
PCST 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (cross listed with POSC 251)
PCST 450: Conflict Resolution: Advanced Theory and Practice
POSC 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (cross listed with PCST 251)
POSC 376: Organization Theory [POSC 110 or consent]
REL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (cross listed with PCST 325 and PHIL 325)
SOC 345: Social Psychology [SOC 101, or consent of instructor]

*(The following courses may count when they have a substantial amount of social entreprenuership and leadership components and they must have the cluster coordinator's approval.)
BUS 490: Independent Internship
BUS 494: International Business Travel Course
BUS 496: Special Topics in Business
IELP 401C: Individualized Experiential Learning Project (Citizenship rubric)
LEAD 495: Selected Topics in Leadership and Organization Studies
LEAD 499: Individual Study

+ - Social Service

Focus: This cluster is designed to introduce and provide a broad orientation to students who may be interested in a career in the helping professions. The underlying premise is that one must have an understanding of the worldviews of the clientele to be served as well as those of the various professions involved in delivering social services. It also is designed to provide a working definition of the logistics of the professions involved.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Sociology Department Chair, Director, Babbie Center, and Instructional Associate Professor of Sociology: Dr. Edward Day

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Because you may not apply a GE course to more than one GE category, no cluster courses may be shared with another GE category.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors. (Note: majors in Sociology will have limited course selections because they may not choose SOC classes.)

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ENG 327: Multicultural Literatures of the U.S [ENG 256]
FSN 200: Nutrition for Life
FSN 201: International Nutrition: The World Food Crisis
IES 300: Valuing Differences in American Society
PHIL 315: Voluntary Service
SOC 211: Social Problems [SOC 101]
SOC 293: Introduction to Social Work
SOC 393: Child Abuse [SOC 101]
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