Chapman University Catalog 2014-2015

James Coyle, Ph.D., Director, Center for Global Education

Kristy Beavers, Associate Director, Center for Global Education

Chapman University has a comprehensive international education program which includes semester and academic year–long programs and exchanges, interterm and summer faculty–led travel courses and summer international internships. In addition to these offerings, Chapman offers a number of courses at overseas locations and globally focused events at Chapman University throughout the year. International student and scholar services are also housed within the Center for Global Education, providing immigration and support services for undergraduate and graduate degree–seeking students. For additional information contact the Center for Global Education at (714) 997–6830.

Semester Abroad Program with The American Institute For Foreign Studies (AIFS) in Cannes, France

AIFS–Cannes, France, offers a vast array of beginning, intermediate and advanced French language courses as well as general education courses taught in French and/or English in art history, organizational leadership, history/sociology and French cinema. Chapman University oversees AIFS–Cannes and is responsible for the transcription of all grades. A unique internship program at the International Cannes Film Festival is offered each spring to students accepted into the program by the Center for Global Education. Students may study with AIFS–Cannes during the fall and spring semesters. Contact the Center for Global Education at the Orange campus for more details at (714) 997–6830.

Semester Abroad Program with Athena Study Abroad in Paros Island, Greece

Athena Study Abroad/Hellenic International Studies in the Arts (HISA) offers a vast array of courses in philosophy, literature, painting, photography, digital imaging, art theory, film studies, creative writing, women’s studies and Greek language in the historical and classical landscape of Paros Island, Greece. Chapman University is responsible for the academic content of the courses that Chapman transcribes at Athena–Paros Island. Students may study with Athena Study Abroad/HISA during the fall and spring semesters. Contact the Center for Global Education at the Orange campus for more details at (714) 997–6830.

Semester Abroad Program with Athena in Seville, Spain

Athena Study Abroad/Centro de Lenguas e Intercambio Cultural (CLIC) offers a vast array of beginning, intermediate and advanced Spanish language courses as well as courses in history, music, art and Spanish culture in the capital of Spain's Andalusia region. Chapman University is responsible for the academic content of the courses that Chapman transcribes at Athena–Seville. Students may study with Athena Study Abroad/CLIC during the fall and spring semesters. Contact the Center for Global Education at the Orange campus for more details at (714) 997–6830.

Semester Abroad Program with Anglo–American University in Prague, Czech Republic

Anglo–American University offers a vast array of courses in Prague art and architecture, European history, Jewish studies, the Czech language along with a variety of courses in humanities, social sciences, journalism and communication, international relations and diplomacy. Chapman University is responsible for the transcription of all grades. Students may study at the Anglo–American University in Prague during the fall and spring semesters. Contact the Center for Global Education at the Orange campus for more details at (714) 997–6830.

Course Descriptions – Chapman Courses Abroad

Art

ART 460 19th and 20th Century French Art (Cannes)

This survey of French painters examines movements and individual artists, emphasizing impressionists and artists of the School of Paris, many of whom lived and painted on the Riviera. Students visit local museums containing their works. Seminars taught in English. This course meets 3½ hours a week for 12 weeks (42 hours). When taught in French, this seminar is ART 461. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ART 461 19th and 20th Century French Art (Cannes)

This survey of French painters examines movements and individual artists, emphasizing impressionists and artists of the School of Paris, many of whom lived and painted on the Riviera. Students visit local museums containing their works. Seminars taught in French. This course meets 3½ hours a week for 12 weeks (42 hours). When taught in English, this seminar is ART 460. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

Film and Television

FTV 311 Cinema Francais/French Cinema (Cannes)

Prerequisite, must place into lower intermediate French and above. This course is taught in French. The course introduces cinematographic language with an overview of the evolution of French cinema through in–depth analysis of major themes and movements in key works of three important modern periods — French Poetic Realism, the New Wave, and cinema from the 1980s to the presents. 3 credits.

French

FREN 103 Spoken French and Phonetics (Cannes)

One hour a week in the language laboratory. Emphasis is on intonation, articulation, and sentence rhythm with phonetic correction on tapes. It must be taken in conjunction with a language course and does not carry any extra credit. (Offered every semester.) 0 credit.

FREN 180 Intensive French Language: Elementary (Cannes)

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is only offered at the American Institute for Foreign Studies in Cannes, France. This is a first-year college-level cours pratique in grammar, conversation, phonetics and writing practice for beginners and students with up to two years of high school French. (Offered every semester.) 3–9 credits.

FREN 280 Intensive French Language: Intermediate (Cannes)

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is only offered at the American Institute for Foreign Studies in Cannes, France. At the intermediate level, this cours pratique covers vocabulary, grammar, composition, phonetics, and techniques of written expression. (Offered every semester.) 3–9 credits.

FREN 305 French Literature: 17th to 20th Century (Cannes)

Prerequisite, must place into upper–intermediate French (Intermediaire II). This course for French majors provides a panorama of French literature, including drama, poetry, and fiction. Concentration is on key works of the 17th to the 20th centuries. 3 credits.

FREN 380 Intensive French Language: Upper Intermediate (Cannes)

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is only offered at the American Institute for Foreign Studies in Cannes, France. For students at the upper-intermediate level, this cours pratique maintains, improves, and refines knowledge of the French language through systematic study of tenses, moods, and subordinate clauses. (Offered every semester.) 3–9 credits.

FREN 480 Intensive French Language: Advanced (Cannes)

This cours pratique stresses structural exercises in grammar, correct use of types of language commercial, administrative, journalistic, familiar, colloquial, and formal. French civilization is studied via social, political, economic, and cultural themes. 9 credits.

International Internships

INTI 490A International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisite, junior standing, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 10-week internship in Australia, New Zealand, Shanghai, Hong Kong, or Santiago, Chile and apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation; participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia, New Zealand, Shanghai, Hong Kong, or Chile relative to their major. May be repeated for credit. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

INTI 490B International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisites, non-Chapman University student, junior standing, 2.5 GPA, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 10-week internship in Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, Chile or Spain and to apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation, participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, Chile or Spain or relative to their major. (Offered as needed.) 6 credits.

INTI 491B International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisites, non-Chapman University student, junior standing, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 6-week internship in Australia, New Zealand, China, Spain, Hong Kong, or Chile and apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation; participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia, New Zealand, China, Spain, Hong Kong, or Chile relative to their major. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

INTI 493 Internship Program in London

Prerequisite, at least junior standing. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 8-week internship in London, England and apply classroom learning to a professional business setting. Students reside in student accommodations, attend a pre-departure orientation and in-country program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in London relative to their major. P/NP. (Offered every summer.) 3 credits.

INTI 494 Internship in Madrid

Prerequisites, at least junior standing, language proficiency equivalent to 5 semesters of college-level Spanish. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 2 week intensive course in Spanish along with a 6-week internship in Madrid, Spain, thereby applying classroom learning to a professional international business setting. Students reside in home stay arrangements, attend a pre-departure orientation, participate in a 2 week language course, and are placed with appropriate employers in Madrid relative to their major. Students will be working 5 days a week (4 days at the internship site and the 5th day on related schoolwork). P/NP. (Offered every summer.) 3 credits.

INTI 495 Internship Program in Dublin

The course provides the opportunity for students to participate in an 8 week program with a 7 week internship component in Dublin. Students will have the opportunity to apply classroom learning to a professional setting. Students participate in an on-site orientation upon arrival in Dublin and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Dublin relative to their major. P/NP. Fee: TBD (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

Leadership Studies

LEAD 303 Organizational Administration: A European Context (Cannes)

Examination of European context of administration, with emphasis on France. Topics include: post–war economic transformation, socio–political system, dilemma of the welfare state, unemployment, health, retirement and French organizational culture, and origins and operations of the EU. 3 credits.

Political Science

POSC 303 La Vie Politique en France/French Political Life (Cannes)

Political institutions of the Fifth Republic, the roles of the president of the republic, the government and parliament, the constitution, administrative functions at various levels of government from national to local, and the present political situation. 3 credits.

Sociology

SOC 308 French Civilization (Cannes)

France is presented through its history, geography, and politics. Emphasis is on the media, daily life of young people, educational institutions, and fashion–related topics. Course taught in English. (When taught in summer, this course is offered for 1 credit.) (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 309 La Societe Française/French Society (Cannes)

Prerequisite, must place into upper intermediate French (Intermediaire II) or higher. This course is taught in French. The course defines principal structures of French society — political, geographical, economic, and educational — and examines human aspects of contemporary France. Emphasis is on traditions, innovations, structures, and contradictions. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Theatre

TH 310 Expression Theatrale/Acting: Theatrical Expression (Cannes)

Prerequisites, language levels applicable: Elementary III (1st degree), Intermediate I, II, III (2nd degree), Proficiency (3rd degree). This course is taught in French. This course meets four to six hours per week and emphasizes rhythm and articulation of the French language employing a different, original “script” each month, written by the professor. Dramatic sketches, designed with roles suitable for all participants, use expressions and themes drawn from daily life and emphasize the sound of French as it is spoken. The number of hours per week is determined by the role assigned. Students who enroll in this course must pay a supplementary fee to the College (approximately $175 times two or three optional sessions per semester). (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

Study Abroad

Course numbers suffixed with SA are taken abroad through the Center for Global Education. These courses have been determined to be equivalent to the corresponding Chapman course; however, the credit load and curricula may differ from the course description listed in this catalog.

SA 194 Study Abroad

Prerequisites, sophomore standing, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–12 credits.

SA 197 International Exchange Program

Prerequisites, sophomore standing, consent of instructor, consent of study abroad office. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $500. (Offered as needed.) 12 credits.

SA 198 Study Abroad Affiliate Program

Prerequisites, sophomore standing, consent of instructor, consent of study abroad office. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $500. (Offered as needed.) 12 credits.

SA 199 Study Abroad Partner Program

Prerequisites, sophomore standing, consent of instructor, consent of study abroad office. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $500. (Offered as needed.) 12 credits.

SA 394 Study Abroad

Prerequisites, junior standing, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–12 credits.

SA 498 Semester Abroad

Prerequisites, junior standing, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $400. (Offered as needed.) 15 credits.

SA 499 Semester Abroad

Prerequisites, junior standing, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Fee: $400. (Offered as needed.) 15 credits.

Course Descriptions – IPGP (Paros Island, Greece)

IPGP 101 Modern Greek Language I

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language in the first of two sequential semester classes. It is designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the basic grammar and the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and to converse on a wide range of topics, students explore the Modern Greek cultural landscape and living habits, participating in field trips as part of their assignments. Thus, this introduction to the language aids a cultural immersion into the whole of contemporary Greek society. Not equivalent to GRK 101. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 102 Modern Greek Language II

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is an introduction to Modern Greek language in the second of two sequential semester classes. This course deepens students' familiarity with the formal aspects of the language and broadens their vocabulary. Students will progress beyond the basic level of competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as participate in cultural activities outside the classroom. Not equivalent to GRK 102. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 110 Theory of Art

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course aims to expose students to the ideas and beliefs of other artists in order to help clarify their sense of what it means to be an artist today, and to further enlighten the daily work done in the studio by enabling students to develop their own critical and theoretical points of view. Students will learn to sharpen the verbal, analytical, and presentation skills needed to present one’s ideas and work and/or pursue a concurrent career in museum or gallery work, writing criticism, collecting or cataloguing artworks, or teaching art history. Methods used will include a teacher/student collaborative investigation into why different artists structure their vision the way they do, and an in-depth exploration of artists’ perceptions of their own work, through autobiographical writings, films, and music. Discussion sessions will also center on the personal themes and beliefs that each student feels are central to their own art. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 111 Art Workshop: Painting

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course aims to further the understanding of painting by studying such elements as light, color, composition, and texture. There will be expanded practice in the basic concepts of painting, exploring it through a variety of approaches, media, processes, and experimentation. The class will develop the student’s understanding of developing a painting both physically as well as conceptually. The student will be exposed to different genres of the vocabulary of painting, from the traditional objective through the non-objective. Class trips to museums, islands, villages will help students learn not only about past Greek art, but also will become a way to learn about contemporary Greek life, art, music, and passion for life. The teacher will help students channel these new experiences into inspired and searching paintings. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 112 Digital Imaging: Beginner

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. For the student who has conventional photography experience, this course is intended as a solid grounding in digital imaging techniques, but aims as well to move forward students who have some acquaintance with artistic digital photography. General procedures related to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, Photoshop and video editing software basics, input and output options will be covered. Students will also become familiar with how to learn new techniques as they emerge for a self-motivated ability to find and use the techniques relevant to their work. Students will manipulate their images and explore the technical illusions of movement and animation. The course will provide a background for contemporary thought about digital images. It includes a survey of current artists working with digital technologies and a discussion of these practices in terms of conceptual questions of documentation, reproduction, what is “live”, self-expression, and theories of objectivity. The current parameters of digital practice will be questioned and students will examine its potential integration into other media. Participants will also question how digital technology might alter perception in terms of simultaneity, continuity, speed of attention, and ideas of truth. It is recommended that the Theories of Art Class at HISA be attended in conjunction with the class. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 113 Black and White Photography

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity for exploration into the world and people around us as well as our perceptions. Intensive course work will assist students in developing technical abilities in exposing negatives and making technically perfect prints, creating a professional portfolio, and mastering the language of photography. In addition, the unique cultural exploratory components of this course will enable students to personalize his/her vision and mode of expression, develop and enhance visual thinking, and provide photographic interaction with Greece and Greek culture: historical and present-day. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 114 Cross-Disciplinary Philosophy: Life Themes

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is designed to explore and evaluate our personal sources of knowing, believing, and existing. Rather than a traditional survey of philosophers and their writings, the course calls upon each student to examine where his/her moral, ethical, spiritual, political, and romantic belief systems originate: how and why we lead our lives the way we do. Fundamental to Life Themes is a challenge to preconceived notions of what we accept as Truth, and in particular preconceived notions of “correctness” in morality, ethics, taboo, loyalty, sacrifice, sex, family relations, and even what we eat. The purpose of the course is not to change anyone’s belief system, but it is the intent of the course’s guided inquiry to encourage students to open their minds to explore the genesis of their own and others’ belief systems. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 204 Creative Writing - Beginner

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is an intensive workshop designed to encourage writers to discover and experiment with their own voice. The course will assist the student's exploration into the realm of his/her own creative resources, away from the dependence on learned authority or the weighty impressions of the "great writers." To aid in this process of discovery, students perform spontaneous writing exercises in class and experiment with persona, voice and character. Each week, students will submit new writing for open, non-judgmental critique and discuss in a small workshop setting the ideas and feelings they possess about writing and how it relates to their lives. Questions on “craft” will be examined from different points of view, but no hierarchy of style or manner will be favored. Equated as ENG 204. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 210 Cycladic Art and Culture

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course attempts to deepen students' understanding and appreciation of the rich cultural history of the Cycladic Island world. Students will learn to situate the various sites, objects, events, traditions and themselves within the context of Greek, Western, and Global History. Visits will be made daily to important sites as well as museums where appropriate, plus galleries and shops where works of art are on display. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 236 Literature: Archetypal Themes

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This literature course consists of two different modules: readings in Classical Greek literature and “The Art of the Novel and Novella”. The modules are not taught sequentially (i.e. first Greek then “modern”), but rather are carefully ordered so that a student who desires to concentrate on only one segment may do so at a reasonable pace across the entire 13-week period. The approach is to use perspectives gained from one line of reading to inform the other: archetypes and patterns from the Classical; “existential” questions about search for meaning from the other. Thus, what appears at first glance to be an odd coupling actually forms a neatly integrated program of study if taken in full. Equated as ENG 236. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 239 American Literature 1865-Present

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course will survey major trends and writers in American literature from the end of the Civil War to the present. Students will examine the shift in the late 19th century from Romanticism to Naturalism and the 20th century experiments of Modernism and Post-Modernism. The course will explore the essence of the modern novel through the study of well-known American authors, as well as "alternative" voices such as immigrants, native Americans, minority groups, and social and life-style activists. Equated as ENG 239. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 260 Film Studies: From Literature to Film

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is designed to alert students to the various ways in which works of literature (novel, short story, and play) are translated to the screen. A selection of films drawn from different literary genres will be considered in order to gain a sense of the historical development of literature and cinema. Students will learn to critique the disparate elements of acting, direction, and in particular the script, while lectures and class discussions will examine how the screenwriter has selected, edited, or changed the literary text. An in-depth exploration will be made into why such choices have been made and consider the effectiveness of such adaptations. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the patterning of thought and theme, evoking a cross-disciplinary analysis of the archetypes central to the Literature and Creative Writing courses. Students will learn to view film and literature as synergistic art forms, appreciating the differences and convergence of the narrative method in both disciplines, thus deepening their critical abilities. Equated as ENG 260. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 304 Creative Writing - Advanced

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is an intensive workshop in creative prose, traditional and non-traditional, centered on student work and with special consideration of the interests and academic and professional goals of the workshop members. Course work will concentrate on the writing and editing of student work with a view to increasing the length and complexity of prose pieces towards the goal of the novel. Risk-taking is encouraged, as well as serious self-reflection on writing content and design. The aim is to produce already maturely scrutinized works that can be presented to agents and publishers with some confidence, and a positive attitude towards rejection, revision and criticism. Equated as ENG 304. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 311 Art Workshop: Advanced Painting (2D)

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This studio course is designed for students who have a solid grounding in drawing and painting, in both the theory and practical aspects of visual art, and who want to develop and produce a researched and coherent body of work. The course will help students develop work which addresses in an incisive and in-depth manner the fundamental plastic properties of 2D art as well as the theoretical, aesthetic issues painters face today. Students will be encouraged to develop a personal point of view fusing an exploration and understanding of methods and materials with a philosophical, aesthetic position. The importance of research and development, leading to in-depth studio work, will also be emphasized, as will an understanding of the differences and similarities between North American and European contemporary art and culture, plus how American students in Europe are influenced by and position themselves within that polarization in the case of Study Abroad students. Prior art theory and/or art history course/s or the Theories of Art class at HISA is a prerequisite. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 312 Digital Imaging Advanced

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is designed for students who have previous experience in photography and digital imaging, and who wish to further develop digital imaging techniques to produce a researched and coherent body of work in artistic digital photography. The course will enhance students' skills in using various procedures related to new technology and equipment including digital photography and digital manipulations, input and output options, Photoshop and video editing software, all of which are covered in the first semester course, Digital Imaging - Beginner. Students are also required to show some ability in manipulating their images using the technical illusions of movement and animation. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 313 Studio for Interrelated Media

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This intensive inter-disciplinary arts studio class is designed to help students focus their experiential and creative study abroad experience within the context of their Greek island historical, cultural and artistic environment. Elements of mixed-media projects, painting and drawing, digital still and video film, graphic art constructions and installations, will all form part of the student's semester of study. Also inherent will be lectures and instruction concerning website design and online presentation of art and installation projects, leading to the student's own career objectives. With an eye on depth of content, as well as exploratory and investigative approaches, basic themes may be drawn from personal experiences, archetypal literary patterns, philosophical and spiritual beliefs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 314 Film Studies: Four Directors

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course is designed to move the student forward from undergraduate film survey into a close analysis of the work of four important directors of differing national traditions and with different focus and historical significance: Federico Fellini, Alfred Hitchcock, Eric Rohmer, and Luis Bunel. Individual selected films and oeuvres as a whole are considered for their cinematic concerns as well as influence on other filmmakers in order to give the student a strong sense of the significance of each auteur within the scope of film history as well as within an intellectual, social, and technical context. Filmmakers will be discussed in terms of their own development as well, and attention will be given to genre and the evolution of critical approaches to their work. Analysis, group discussions, and individual student presentations will accompany each film, along with readings from course texts. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 325 Introduction to Shakespeare

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course has as its primary objective the goal of making the student an intelligent and critical reader of Shakespeare. Major and representative plays are covered - comedies, tragedies, and histories - as well as samplings of the sonnets. While each selection is examined as a work on its own terms, there will also be a focus on various ways in which the pieces reflect Renaissance culture, historical and intellectual trends, development in the theatre and in poetics, and philosophical exploration. We will trace the development of the bard’s styles and modes, explore his source materials and use of them, analyze his craft and strategies, and, importantly, attempt to forge an appreciation of the plays as both literature and theatrical productions. Equated as ENG 325. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 330 Women’s Studies: The Goddess

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. The objective of this course is to give an in-depth understanding of the great feminine divinities of Ancient Greece and of what they might represent, for the ancients as well as for ourselves in the 21st century. Many of the notions and concepts that are relevant to the Greek goddesses will be studied. In particular, participants of the course will question how the notion of the feminine has been constructed and translated through myth, and review both the speculative and historical record of the shift from worship of the Goddess over time to sky-god, patriarchal religion/s. In order to do that, course work will examine works of art and literature that deal with the different aspects of the Goddess, not simply her displacement, but the different ways she is portrayed and referenced – both positively and negatively. A great part of the course lectures are centered around Classical Greece, aimed at taking advantage of the location in which students are studying. An attempt is made to cover a certain sweep of eras and countries to give an indication of how various and profoundly omni-present is the idea of the female Deity. Equated as REL 330. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPGP 346 Literature: Modern Writers in Greece

Taught in Paros Island, Greece. This course focuses on those works of certain modern writers in which the idea of inquiry into the shifting nature of “truth,” “reality,” and in particular the writer’s grappling with the sense of individual destiny as inextricably linked with artistic exploration is paramount. Intensive examination of the texts in both lecture and seminars, as well as encouraging the students to simultaneously explore their own artistic leanings within the unique setting of Paros (whether as a writer or in a different area), will hopefully impart a greater appreciation of the link between place and artistic output. Equated as ENG 346. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – IPCP (Prague, Czech Republic)

IPCP 100 Introduction to Sociology

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will be introduced to “sociological thinking”, the way in which the situations, decisions, actions, identities, and life opportunities of individuals are shaped by broader societal processes. Students will be enabled to understand the world from a sociological point of view. Equated as SOC 101. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 101 Introduction to Psychology

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will develop the skills and background knowledge which will enable them to think critically about psychological issues and apply them constructively in their lives. Students will also trace the development of psychology from its origins to its present day forms. Equated as PSY 101. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 103 Introduction to Politics I

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. This course provides an introduction to the concepts of sovereignty, the nation and supra-nationalism, power, authority and legitimacy, law, order and justice, duty and citizenship, equality, social justice and welfare, human nature, the individual and society, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism, democracy, and fascism. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 104 Introduction to Politics II

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will get an insight to the concept of the modern state; constitutions and governmental design; national decision-making institutions; bureaucracy and the public sector; law and the courts; voting behavior; elections; parties; political economy of the state; international framework of politics. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 106 Intro to International Relations

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will be introduced to the historical settings of IR, globalization of IR and IR theory in general. Students will focus on key concepts such as liberalism/idealism, realism, neorealism, neoliberalism, international social theory, critical theories; systematic level concepts in IR; levels of analysis; actors in IR, institutions in IR. It will also offer an introduction to international political economy; international security in the post-cold war era; 20th century total wars; peace and diplomacy; the ethical problem of humanitarian intervention and the issues of the New World Order. Equated as POSC 120. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 108 Intro to Diplomacy

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students are introduced to diplomacy of the 21st century, diplomatic relations, diplomatic missions, MFA—organization and structure, diplomatic protocol, diplomatic privileges and immunities, international organizations, international law, conferences, and entertainment. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 110 Public Speaking

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. This course helps students develop communication skills and provides background knowledge into the communication process. Topics include listening, impromptu speeches; freeing the voice and body, listening, outlining; personal experience speech; organizational patterns, beginning and ending speeches; delivering another person’s speech from an outline; informative speech; persuasive speaking, appeals, Maslow‘s hierarchy of needs; audience analysis, reasoning with evidence and argument, Monroe pattern for persuasion; effective communication in groups. Equated as COM 101. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 111 Intro to Mass Communication

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. This course introduces the structures and practices of mass communication. Students will discuss the social, political, cultural, and economic factors that affect the production and reception of media messages. Topics will include the history of media technologies, the economics of media, making the news, alternative media, advertising in society, ideology, the public, activism and media, media effects, and the emerging global order. Equated as COM 151. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 200 Political Philosophy

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will be introduced to major works of political philosophy such as Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Polis, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau. Students will discuss issues such as political legitimacy in the modern mode, Social Contrast theory, principles of liberalism, critique of the Enlightenment, Marx’s critique of capitalism, Foucault’s critique of power, two models of democracy: representative and participatory, social justice and liberty, democracy and justice: feminist revisions. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 201 Introduction to Social Science Research Methods

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Prerequisite, SOC 101, or IPCP 100. Students will develop their skills in critically evaluating different research methodologies used in social sciences. Students will understand the fundamental concepts and procedures involved in conducting qualitative research and will analyze the advantages and disadvantages of such data collection techniques. Equated as SOC 201. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 202 Nations and Nationalism

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will gain an insight into the national awakening, national policies of multi-ethnic states and national programs and their leaders. The course will center around three phenomena that had fateful consequences for the 20th century: the unsuccessful attempt to eliminate national tensions by creating new nation-states after WWI, and the encounters with both major totalitarian ideologies - Nazism and Communism. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 203 Political Geography

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will develop an insight into the political geography of the world order, uneven development, the rise and fall of the superpowers, the multipolar world, the state and the world order, the nation-state, the state as spatial entity, people and the state, the global villagers, citizens and the city. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 205 World History I

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Student will be introduced to the history of several regions such as: Ancient Mesopotamia, Near East, India, China, the Greeks, the Roman Republic, the Roman Empire. We will also discuss the rise of Christianity, the end of the Roman Empire, the Middle Ages in Europe, the rise and growth of Islam, Medieval Africa, S. E. Asia, China, and Japan in the Middle ages, Europe and the world by 1500. Equated as HIST 201. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 206 World History II

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will be introduced to major world civilizations in the Early Modern Period such as the native “Americans,” the Muslim empires, and China and Japan. Students will study several “revolutionary” European events of global importance, including English constitutional developments in the 17th century, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution. Students will also gain insight into Late 19th century imperialism, the global significance of the two world wars, and the international dimensions of the Cold War. Equated as HIST 202. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 207 History of the Cold War and Post-Cold War Transition

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will gain insight into several events and concepts of World War II such as the Allies and enemies in WWII; Teheran, Yalta and Potsdam, the atomic bomb; the Truman doctrine, the Marshall Plan and the crisis of 1948. This course will also discuss the Cold War in the Far East; China and the Korean war, 1950; the Soviet Union of Nikita Khrushchev; USSR vs. USA in the Middle East; from Berlin to Cuba; Vietnam to the Helsinki accords; Reagan vs. Gorbachev; and the revolutions of Eastern Europe. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 210 Literature of Prague

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will study literature about Prague and originating in Prague. The course will discuss German and Jewish literature, Glory of Prague art and architecture, the labyrinth of Prague fantasies, energy of Prague avant-garde, humor of everyday life, and the pain of exile and exclusion. Authors such as Capek, Hašek, Havel, Hrabal, Jesensk8, Kafka, Kundera, Meyrink, Neruda, Seifert and Weil will be referenced in the course. Equated as ENG 260. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 301 Social Psychology

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students will get an insight into the dynamics between the individual and the society. Students will realize how an individual is influenced by the environment, and in return how he/she can influence the environment. Students are able to analyze social identity and social development of an individual, and recognize behavior such as prejudices, stereotypes, aggression and altruism. Equated as PSY 336. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 302 Gender Equality in Europe

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Prerequisite, IPCP 100. Students will study gender issues in Europe, covering the historical perspectives of patriarchy and communism and focusing on the specifics of post-socialist transition in East Central Europe. Equated as SOC 350. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 303 Popular Culture and Media Theory

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Prerequisite, IPCP 100. Students will be introduced to several thinkers – philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists, and others – who have dealt with the media and popular culture in their works. Students will understand what is culture and media, how they make meaning, and the best ways to interpret their messages. Equated as SOC 311. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 308 Global Security

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Prerequisite, POSC 120. Students will learn about threats to the national security; the terms and conditions of implementing and controlling military power; the probability of use of military power; its impact on the individual and on a state, society and the foreign policy of preparing for war, preventing a war or engaging in war; the role of the policy making, arms control, diplomacy and national security policy and strategies. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPCP 310 European History II

Taught in Prague, Czech Republic. Students are introduced to politics, economics and the church in Western and Central Europe, in the Early Modern period. Students will discuss key concepts and periods such as the Renaissance, humanism, the Reformation (Lutheranism/Calvinism), the Counter-Reformation, ritual, magic and the Sacred in the Early Modern Period, territorial confessionalism, Religious wars, tolerance and Intolerance, Enlightenment and Absolutism, French Revolution, Industrial Revolution, nationalism and imperialism, the First World War, Europe after the War, World War II in Europe, the Soviet experiment, post World War II. Equated as HIST 338. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – IPSS (Seville, Spain)

IPSS 101 Elementary Spanish I

Taught in Seville, Spain. Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. Equated as SPAN 101. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

IPSS 102 Elementary Spanish II

Taught in Seville, Spain. Students develop basic competence in the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and composition writing. Emphasis is placed on conversational skills pertinent to a variety of social situations in different cultures. Equated as SPAN 102. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

IPSS 110 Photography: Theory and Technique

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course explores the possibilities of photography as a way of expression and information. Students will learn how to read photographs and their meaning, and as well as develop technical photographic skills. Topics will include the history of photography, the importance of new technologies applied to photography, and an analytic vision of contemporary images. Equated as ART 199. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 111 Basic Principles of Spanish Grammar for English-Speaking Students

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course familiarizes students with the basic rules of Spanish language. As a result, commonplace situations in everyday life will become more manageable. Practical exercises will include dictations, listening comprehension activities, reading comprehensions, written exercises, and vocabulary exercises. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 112 Conversation and Composition in Spanish for American Students

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course, geared toward students who speak American English and who have no prior knowledge of Spanish, develops students ability to express themselves orally and in written form. Students will be able to initiate and maintain a conversation using limited vocabulary content, to produce phrases and basic conversational routines, to narrate and describe social situation, and draft basic written forms. Exercises will include role-play, written drafts, games, and debates. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 122 Music and Society: Theory and Practice of Flamenco

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course provides an aural, visual, and theoretical understanding of Flamenco, of the streams of culture which created it, and of its role within Spanish culture. Students will study Flamenco as a vehicle to explore the relationship between art and culture, and music and society. Equated as MUS 122. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 201 Intermediate Spanish I

Taught in Seville, Spain. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. Through intensified reading and composition writing students also explore the diverse geography and culture of the Hispanic world. Equated as SPAN 201. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

IPSS 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Taught in Seville, Spain. Students work on expanding and improving communicative skills to encompass most social and some professional situations. Through intensified reading and composition writing students also explore the diverse geography and culture of the Hispanic world. Equated as SPAN 202. (Offered every semester.) 4 credits.

IPSS 210 The Classical Heritage of Spain: Between History and Mythology

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course provides students with an overview of Spain's classical heritage. Special attention will be paid to the presence of Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans in Spain, not only from a historical point of view, but also taking into account the mythological construction of Spain's past and Spain's key cultural traditions. The Course also explores Spain's religious background, mainly the long process of Christianization in southern Spain. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 211 Great Masters and the Major Artistic Trends in Spain during the 20th Century

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course will analyze the principal trends in Spanish art during the twentieth century. Artists are chosen who are representative of certain developments in a key way and through whom, in general terms, Spanish art in the 20th century may be explored. Equated as ART 299. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 212 Introduction to Spanish Cultural Studies

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course provides a core familiarity with Spanish history and culture. Students will obtain a broad sense of the tensions and turning-points that have shaped the Spanish past and help to understand its present. Extra-curricular activities include field trips to various local monuments, as well as film showings. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 310 Audiovisual Languages: Subtitling and Dubbing

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course provides an in-depth view of the different techniques used for the translation of film and television scripts for dubbing and subtitling purposes. Students will engage in practical work in Spanish based on previously translated television and film content. Course content includes character number limitations, content reduction, adaptation to reading speeds, and lip movement synchronization. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 311 Gender Views in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Cinema

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course explores gender representations (ranging from feminist perspectives, gender perspectives, or the theory and practice of female writing, to questions of sexual politics and identity, patterns of masculinity and queer theory) within contemporary Spanish literature, cinema and media. Besides analyzing a selection of works by the most representative authors conforming contemporary literary and cinematic panorama in Spain, students will also examine the different critical paradigms and theories within the field of gender and sexuality studies and how they are formulated within a range of cultural texts and contexts. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 312 US-European Relations Since World War II

Taught in Seville, Spain. This Course will provide students with the theoretical framework necessary to help them think critically about transatlantic relations at many different, yet inter-related levels: political, military, security-based, cultural, and economic. The first part of the Course will focus on the historical context of this key network, while special emphasis will be placed on US-Spain relations. The second part of the Course will examine the institutions linked to the transatlantic agenda: of a political, security-based, and economic kind. The third part of the Course will focus on cultural issues, including public opinion and anti-Americanism. The last part of the Course will look at the future of the transatlantic relationship. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 313 Contemporary Spain: Economy, Society and Environment

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course focuses on the ways in which relationships between people and the natural environment, as well as patterns of spatial relationships, vary throughout Spain. Students will develop an understanding of how these relationships produce the distinctiveness of particular places, landscapes, and patterns of environmental and human attributes, as well as societies and identities. Students will gain an appreciation of the characteristics of the urban, regional and rural environments of selected areas in Spain and of the geographical processes which underlie their development. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 326 The Arab World Today: Contemporary History and International Relations

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course will introduce students to the contemporary history of the Arab world and its international relations during the 20th and 21st centuries. It will describe the major events in the history of Eastern (Mashreq) and Western (Maghreb) Arab states during this period and the development of their relations with Europe and the United States. Special attention will be given to Spanish relations with the Maghreb, particularly with Morocco. Equated as POSC 326. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

IPSS 345 Spanish Conversation

Taught in Seville, Spain. This course further develops the communicative competence of students in Spanish, focusing on the oral expression of one's own ideas and opinions. In addition to speaking, the course includes the acquisition of new vocabulary, the development of socio-cultural competence, a grammar review, and exposure to listening, reading, and to a lesser degree writing. (CEFR level C1) Equated as SPAN 345. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.