Department of Sociology

Lemuel Edward Day, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Bader, Lessor, McGrane, See, Woldemikael;

Associate Professors: Apodaca, Carty, Day, Horton, Larsen;

Assistant Professor: Takaragawa;

Instructor: Magliola.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Sociology studies interaction and relationships among human groups and institutions and how behavior is shaped by these relationships. It examines how society maintains stability and how it changes, investigating both consensus and conflict among social groups. Sociology's subject matter consists of social institutions, including family, work, religion, and social processes such as identity development, deviance and socialization. Sociology majors explore foundational ideas about the nature of society, are introduced to key subfields of the discipline, and acquire fundamental research and analysis skills to carry out their own inquiries. The department’s faculty members emphasize empirical work in a number of subfields including applied and community sociology, the family, health and medicine, law and society, international and global sociology, gender, the sociology of religion, qualitative and quantitative research methods, and cultural anthropology.

Sociology embodies the essential values of a liberal arts education in its emphasis on analysis and problem solving, comparative thinking, writing and critical inquiry. In providing such skills, sociology is a good background for professions in teaching, medicine, social work, law, business and social justice. Finally, sociology provides the breadth of theoretical and methodological training for advanced graduate work in all the behavioral sciences.

Students pursuing the sociology degree must receive at least a "C–" in each of the core courses. All core major courses must be taken for a letter grade, regardless of the emphasis.

Departmental Honors

Students graduating with a GPA of 3.700 or above in the major may be eligible for departmental honors and commendation at the annual Ludie and David C. Henley awards ceremony. Above average participation in university and community service are also considered.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

The department encourages sociology majors to study abroad. If that is not feasible, the department will consider any reasonable proposal that includes significant immersion in another culture. This could be an extensive internship working with migrant workers or one on an American Indian reservation, or an interterm travel course. At least 21 credits must be taken at the upper-division (300-400) course level.

sociology core requirements (21 credits)

SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology

3

SOC 201

Introduction to Research Methods

3

SOC 301

Field Research

3

SOC 305

Social Theory

3

SOC 307

Survey Research

3

SOC 492A

Social Work Field/Practicum, or

 

SOC 492B

Seminar Internship

3

SOC 497

Senior Thesis/Project

3

one of the following (3 credits)

SOC 211

Social Problems

3

SOC 225

Social Inequality/Stratification

3

SOC 306

Social Movements

3

sociology and anthropology electives (24 credits)

24

total credits

 

48

emphasis in social work

It is easy to say that society should be changed and that there are problems that “somebody” should do something about. But what is the right thing to do, how do we find it, and how do we implement it? Social work teaches the ability to analyze social problems and human needs, and to design and implement programs to remedy human suffering.

The social work emphasis can lead to careers in social work, human resource management, or careers working with families and children in federal, state and county agencies and in the legal system. The emphasis constitutes preparation for graduate studies in social work (master of social work or MSW degree). At least 21 credits must be taken at the upper-division (300-400) course level.

sociology core requirements

21

emphasis in social work requirements (6 credits)

SOC 293

Introduction to Social Work

3

SOC 393

Child Abuse

3

one of the following (3 credits)

SOC 225

Social Inequality/Stratification

3

SOC 350

Gender in a Global Perspective

3

SOC 404

Global Family Systems

3

sociology electives (18 credits)

18

total credits

 

48

Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Effectiveness Evaluation Plans BA Sociology.

Students who plan to go on to graduate school for an MSW are strongly urged to take BIOL 204 From Molecules to Cells: Evolution of Life on Earth and additional internships.

Minors in the Department of Sociology

Minor in Anthropology

A minor in anthropology requires a total of 18 credits in courses distributed as outlined below, at least 9 of which must be upper-division. Students who wish to design a minor with a particular emphasis should speak with the anthropology advisor in the sociology department.

The consent of the anthropology advisor is required for approval of course selections. Students must take all courses for a letter grade and earn at least a grade of "C–" in all courses counted towards the anthropology minor.

core requirements (9 credits)

ANTH 102

Cultural Anthropology

3

ANTH 211

Visual Culture

3

ANTH 301

Ethnographic Fieldwork

3

three of the following (9 credits)

two must be upper-division anthropology courses

SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology

3

ANTH 201

Physical Anthropology

3

SOC 211

Social Problems

3

SOC 225

Social Inequality/Stratification

3

ANTH 230

Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

ANTH 296

Indians and Film

3

ANTH 329

Experimental Course

3

ANTH 330

Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

ANTH 335

Anthropology of Space and Place

3

ANTH 360

North and Middle American Indians

3

ANTH 361

Conflict and Social Change in Latin America

3

ANTH 363

African-Caribbean History and Culture

3

SOC 370

Race and Ethnicity

3

ANTH 372

Images of American Indians

3

ANTH 395

Topics in Anthropology

3

ANTH 396

Indians of California

3

ANTH 397

Cultural Mythology

3

ANTH 399

Individual Study

3

total credits

 

18

Minor in Law, Justice and Social Control

A minor in law justice and social control requires a minimum of 21 credits as outlined below, at least 12 of which at upper-division level. Students must take all required courses for a letter grade and earn a minimum of "C-" in required courses.

core requirements (9 credits)

SOC 211

Social Problems

3

SOC 330

Foundations of Criminal Justice

3

SOC 383

Sociology of Deviant Behavior

3

four of the following (12 credits)

BIOL 102

Forensics

3

ANTH 230

Indigenous RIghts - Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

POSC 309

Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society

3

PHIL 318

Political and Legal Philosophy

3

POSC 323

Law and Politics of Mass Atrocity

3

ANTH 330

Indigenous RIghts - Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

SOC 332

Crime, Justice and Globalization

3

SOC 350

Gender in a Global Perspective

3

BIOL 355

Physiology of Drugs

3

SOC 370

Race and Ethnicity

3

SOC 393

Child Abuse

3

SOC 410

Victimless Crimes

3

POSC 439

Disability and the Law

3

PSY 482

Forensic Psychology

3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Sociology

A minor in sociology requires a total of 18 credits in sociology with a minimum of 9 upper-division credits distributed as outlined below.

core requirements (9 credits)

SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology

3

SOC 201

Introduction to Research Methods

3

SOC 211

Social Problems

3

one of the following (3 credits)

SOC 305

Social Theory

3

SOC 345

Social Psychology

3

sociology and anthropology electives (6 credits)

6

total credits

 

18

Course Descriptions – Anthropology

ANTH 102 Cultural Anthropology

The study of how human civilizations adapt to living situations by forming group identity, families, language, and symbols. The examination of how civilizations create world views and concepts of progress, culture, community, and social interaction. Students will explore these questions using models from cultures foreign and familiar. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ANTH 201 Physical Anthropology

This is an introductory course in genetics, evolutionary theory, and primatology. It includes the study of the primate fossil record, with primary emphasis on human evolution and human variation. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 211 Visual Culture

This course offers a general introduction to cultural studies, semiotics and visual anthropology. Visual material culture, such as art, architecture, performance, film, etc., will serve as the subjects to understand why different cultures produce different types of visual artifacts and what they mean. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 230 Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

(Same as ANTH 330.) This course will examine the cultural and historical context of the indigenous cultures of the Americas. In so doing, it will examine the concepts of individual and group human rights, sovereignty, democracy, and the environment. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 282 Folklore

Folklore is passed between the folk within a culture as they share meanings that are in a state of constant change. The energy accumulated within folk expressions fuel religion, art, music, dance, philosophy, food tastes, entertainment, sports, virtually all areas of culture. These folk practices become institutionalized into the structures we see around us while folklore continues to change our daily lives while supporting our traditions and culture. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 296 Indians and Film

The course provides an examination of the history of the depiction of American Indians in American theatrical films. Reading material informs an analysis of the role of the 19th century dime novel and American literature in creating characters, plots, and perspectives that become screenplays for motion pictures. The depiction of the “other” in film is an important aspect of the development of cultural perception and the construction of reality as expressed in art and media. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ANTH 301 Ethnographic Fieldwork

Prerequisite, ANTH 102, or consent of instructor. An introduction to ethnography, this class will teach aspects of field research and data collection through participant observation and interviewing. Students will be taught ethnographic field research methods and writing. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 315 Art and Anthropology

Prerequisite, ANTH 102. This course will use anthropological approaches to analyze artistic movements and the ideological construction of “art” itself. It will take both western and non-western artifacts as its subject, situating them within larger issues of taste, class, politics, identity, and economy. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 329 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, ANTH 102, or consent of instructor. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in anthropology. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 1, 2, 3, or variable credits depending on the subject matter and course demands.

ANTH 330 Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

(Same as ANTH 230.)

ANTH 335 Anthropology of Space and Place

Prerequisite, ANTH 102, or consent of instructor. This course is an introduction to both the anthropology of space and place and ethnographic fieldwork. It is structured by basic theories of proxemics, and power, and the built environment, and will have a site-specific component. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 360 North and Middle American Indians

Origins, archaeology, ethnology, and linguistic relationships of the Indians of North and Middle America. Mexican peasant culture and contemporary Indian problems are also explored. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 361 Conflict and Social Change in Latin America

(Same as PCST 366.) This course examines processes of conflict and social change in contemporary Latin America with a focus on patterns of domination and resistance. Integrating theory and case studies, the course explores colonial legacies; contested development models; revolutionary movements; gender, indigenous, and citizenship struggles; and the role of the U.S. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 363 African-Caribbean History and Culture

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or ANTH 102. This course is designed to explore some of the ideological and philosophical foundations that have shaped African–Caribbean thought. Through interdisciplinary, classical, and contemporary writings, and videos and class discussions, the course will examine ideological and philosophical issues related to colonialism, poverty, racial and cultural identity, religion, and political resistance. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 372 Images of American Indians

Students explore the artistic, political, folk, and scientific images of American Indians in literature, art, anthropology, film, and folklore. The accuracy or inaccuracy of these images will be examined along with reasons for their formation. The impact on popular culture and American Indian societies will be examined. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ANTH 395 Topics in Anthropology

Prerequisite, ANTH 102. This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore topical areas and subject of special interest in anthropology. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

ANTH 396 Indians of California

Students will become familiar with the history, culture, and contemporary lives of California Indians. Topics include early humans in California, the development of a Spanish, Mexican, and American presence and the effects on the native people. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ANTH 397 Cultural Mythology

Mythology is linked to cultural perceptions, values, and cosmology. This cross–cultural study of differing mythologies enhances students' appreciation of traditions in literature, oral tradition, and cultural views. Areas of study include: theories of classification, deconstruction, symbolism, rhetorical evolution, regional adaptation, influence, and cultural continuity. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ANTH 399 Individual Study

Prerequisites, junior standing, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Sociology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

An examination of the basic concepts, principles, and findings of sociology: addressing the nature of human social relations from simple, face–to–face relationships, and through formal organizations and whole societies. Students discover how social patterns are created, how they become organized and established, and how they change. They will also practice and apply sociological concepts to local communities. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 199 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

SOC 201 Introduction to Research Methods

Students will learn how to conduct research using a variety of different methodologies. Topics covered include research design, analysis and reporting. Attention will also be given to the needs of students as practitioners of social research i.e., trying to make sense out of daily reports on sociological findings in various forms of media. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 204 Marriage and the Family

This course studies the family as a social institution considering socio–cultural as well as historical as factors related to sexuality, love, and marital choice. Topics also include adjustment and conflict in marriage and microsociological analysis of family structure and dynamics. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 211 Social Problems

Prerequisite, SOC 101. Society is beset by numerous social problems such as crime, war, hunger, homelessness, divorce, ethnic/gender conflict, violence, and economic power struggles, political corruption, and overpopulation. The class will focus on how we define, treat, and solve social problems. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 225 Social Inequality/Stratification

Examination of stratification according to race, class, and gender in the US and internationally. Attention to ideological, institutional, and cultural manifestations of inequality. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 229 Experimental Course

May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

SOC 281 Sociology of Sex and Gender

Students examine the ways in which macro and micro institutions structure gender relations in society and how gender in turn structures and stratifies the social order. Gender identities and the social consequences of gender stratification are considered, including such topics as the sexual division of labor, sexual politics, and sexual violence. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

SOC 290 Independent Internship

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

SOC 292A Social Work Field/Practicum

(Same as SOC 492A.) Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Students begin supervised fieldwork in a human service agency concentrating on case planning and organizational analysis. This course also provides classroom analysis of the fieldwork practicum, focusing upon establishing basic casework and organizational skills and techniques of the social work profession. P/NP. Maybe be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 293 Introduction to Social Work

This course will provide an introduction to the social work profession. The course will focus on the various levels of social work practice, including individual and group casework, community organization, cultural diversity, and policy–making. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 295 Topics in Sociology

(Same as SOC 395.)

SOC 299 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

SOC 300 Society, Organizations, and Leadership

Examines the potential for conventional norms regarding organizations, organizing, success, and leadership to compromise ethical conduct. Explores impact of social structure on human behavior in organizations (including human resource, structural, political, and cultural perspectives), with focus on role of individual and organizational conscience and moral leadership. Topics include: values-based leadership theories, corporate culture and social responsibility, managing power and privilege, and creating ethical organizational climates. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 301 Field Research

Prerequisites, SOC 201, junior standing, consent of instructor, and peace studies, or political science, or psychology, or sociology, or sociology with social work emphasis major, or sociology minor. An introduction to field research and data collection through participant observation and interviewing. Field notes, ethics of field research, entree to the field site, research relationships, and closure are emphasized through classroom discussion and activity in selected field sites. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 305 Social Theory

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Students explore what makes society possible and how it changes. Critical study of social and political perspectives on these questions. Emergence and evolution of sociology as a systematic discipline. Emphasis on macrostructural theory. Reading of more recent critical theorists, black theorists, feminist theorists, and post–modernists. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 306 Social Movements

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This course introduces students to social movements and collective behavior that have challenged established structures of power, attempted to alter social and cultural relations in the lives of people throughout the world, and have strived to change the dominant visions of Society. This is an interdisciplinary class that will provide an overview of the main theories and issues regarding social movements to understand the interaction between individuals and societal change. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 307 Survey Research

Prerequisite, SOC 201. The class provides students with the skills necessary to accomplish quantitative research methods used in Sociology. Students who take this class will learn quantitative data collection, analysis and reporting and the use of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). Students will also develop an expanded understanding of statistics and its central connection to understanding and interpreting data. Specifically, students will learn when and how to apply correlation, Z-test, T-test, multiple regression, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, and chi-square. This class provides an in-depth focus on survey research, particularly focused on mail, internet and face-to-face surveys. Survey creation, sampling and analysis will also be covered. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 311 Society and Mass Communications

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. An analysis of mass media as a social institution, this course is an interdisciplinary approach to the origins, history, evolution, and social functions of the mass media, the impact of the media on the social self, and the transitions from oral to print to electronic media. Emphasis on electronic media and the impact of media on the social construction of reality. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 312 Sociology of Religion

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This class provides an introduction to the sociology of religion. The class explores various theories that attempt to explain the religious impulse, discusses the differences between types of religious groups, examines reasons why people join (and leave) religious groups, and discusses macro-level tends in religious behavior. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 320 Sociology of Death

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary investigation of death, dying, and the grieving process including, dying as a psychological process, the denial of death, the repression of grief and loss, and relating to one's own death and the death of significant others. Students explore how the experience, fear, and quality of death has changed historically over the centuries. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 325 Social Change

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This course examines how and why social change occurs, and the role we all play as actors in this ever-changing drama. It will analyze social and technological change and its consequences for major social systems. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 326 Mind, Self, and Society in Tibetan Buddhism

This is a ten–day retreat at a Tibetan/American Meditation Center in the spectacular Colorado Rockies. For those interested in the eastern paths of liberation this is a wonderful opportunity to explore your own mind in a new way and to personally experience the teachings of Tibetan Buddhism and their deep relevance for modern life. Lab/travel fees. P/NP. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

SOC 329 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with different topic. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

SOC 330 Foundations of Criminal Justice

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This course discusses the structure and operation of the US criminal justice system. A major emphasis will be placed on selected contemporary issues facing the administrations of criminal justice, including racial profiling, female offenders, hate crimes, official misconduct, and the death penalty. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 332 Crime, Justice and Globalization

Examines crime and criminal justice within the context of increases globalization. Different world systems of law and social control will be compared. Topics such as drugs, prostitution, terrorism, organized crime, warm crimes, and human rights abuses will be discussed within a global perspective. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 335 Society and the Environment

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. A discussion of selected societal impacts on the environment. Topics include environmentalism, alternate environmental policies, and the costs and benefits of different solutions to environmental problems. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 345 Social Psychology

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Discussion and analysis of the relationship between culture, group life, social structure, and human behavior. Emphasis is on the dialogue between the individual and the social collective. Focus is on microsocial theory. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 346 Solving Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country

Prerequisite, one year of college Spanish language studies or equivalent. This three-week course in January immerses students in Costa Rican daily life and culture, and introduces them the ways in which Costa Ricans address social problems. Students will explore such issues as globalization, sustainable development, women’s rights, and democratization. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

SOC 347 Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

(Same as ENG 347.)

SOC 350 Gender in a Global Perspective

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. This course examines social constructions of gender difference and gender inequalities from a comparative, global perspective with an emphasis on developing countries. The course explores, from a gendered perspective, issues of globalization, social and economic development, the international division of labor, military and domestic violence, health and reproductive rights, women's citizenship, and global and local feminisms. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 364 The Political Economy

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. This interdisciplinary course examines the international political economy of production, distribution, and consumption. Students will look at the relationships between history, science, power, and economic systems and how these relationships cut across issues of race, class, gender, nation, and environment. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 370 Race and Ethnicity

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. The course examines meanings of racial and ethnic identities in the United States, the causes of discrimination and prejudice and the responses of minority groups to differential treatment. Focuses on the study of the economic, political, cultural, and historical factors that shaped our historical era and how those factors influence our ethnic and race relations in the United States. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 382 Women, Health, and Healing

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. An exploration of the way in which medical, research and lay assumptions about women influence clinical care and scientific inquiry. Women’s health is analyzed historically in relation to women’s role and social status with emphasis on advances related to the Women’s Health Movement. Inquiries include reproductive, occupational, and mental health, as well as chronic illness. Women are considered as both health care providers and recipients of care. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 383 Sociology of Deviant Behavior

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This course examines why societies label behavior deviant and the distinction between deviance and crime. Theories of deviance’ the amount, distribution and patterns of deviance, political influence, social change, and selected types of deviant activity are discussed. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 385 Medical Sociology

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Course analyzes sickness and health through linking individual illness to larger societal forces such as social class, the structure of work, and health policy. It further examines the experience of illness or disability in respect to identity, social behavior, and relationships. The state of health care in the U.S. is examined in respect to morbidity and mortality, availability of care, and appropriateness of care. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 393 Child Abuse

Prerequisite, SOC 101. This class will examine the definition and causes of child abuse from sociological, cultural, and psychological perspectives and will provide an overview for the helping professions. The legal and child welfare systems will be studied in addition to treatment and prevention aspects of the child abuse issue. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 395 Topics in Sociology

(Same as SOC 295.) Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. An examination of selected topics in sociology. Courses that treat different themes may be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 399 Individual Study

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

SOC 401 Field Research Methods

Prerequisite, SOC 201. An introduction to field research and data collection through participant observation and interviewing. Field notes, ethics of field research, entrée to the field site, research relationships, and closure are emphasized through classroom discussion and activity in selected field sites. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 404 Global Family Systems

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Students examine the concept of family from the perspective of culture. Every society has families that vary widely in their structure. This course explores how the family is formed and how it relates structure and function of the larger society. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 410 Victimless Crimes

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. This course examines various criminal offenses that often lack a complaining “victim” and tend to generate intense social debate due to their consensual nature (e.g., drug use, prostitution, certain sexual activities, gambling). The societal implications of social control policies will be discussed. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

SOC 429 Experimental Course

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 480 Topics in the Sociology of Health

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. This course examines American and global problems of health and illness in relation to structural correlates (economics, social organization, culture) and in respect to how health and illness is experienced by individuals and groups. Courses that treat different topics may be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 481 Holistic Health

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Analysis of the socio–cultural correlates of health and illness with emphasis upon cross–cultural belief systems of etiology, diagnosis, and intervention strategies. Focus of study is upon widely diverse belief systems, including, but not limited to allopathic, homeopathic, Oriental, Aboriginal, and Native American. “Hands–on” in–class activities and field trips, as well as traditional pedagogical approaches. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 483 Political Economy of Health and Medicine

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. An examination of health, illness and medical care in the context of the social and political structure of society. The health care delivery system is analyzed at the macrosocial and microsocial levels. Topics include health care funding, allocation of resources, the ways in which power is distributed in the health care arena, and the outcome for the health of adults and children. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

SOC 490 Independent Internship

Prerequisites, SOC 101, consent of instructor. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

SOC 492A Social Work Field/Practicum

(Same as SOC 292A.)

SOC 492B Seminar Internship

Prerequisite, SOC 101, or consent of instructor. Seminar-based practicum in which interns meet regularly as a group with a faculty member to share, discuss, and evaluate their experiences. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 1–3 credits.

SOC 497 Senior Thesis/Project

Prerequisites, SOC 401, senior standing, or consent of instructor. Each sociology major is required to do a significant research project, resulting in a substantial research paper. Choice of topics will be made in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

SOC 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, approval of petition. Directed reading and/or research deigned to meet specific needs of superior upper-division students. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Minors

Wilkinson College offers three interdisciplinary minors that draw on the expertise of faculty members from across the college. They offer a holistic approach that brings to bear the insights of various fields upon the study of each minor.

Minor in Asian Studies

The minor in Asian studies provides students with a background in the history, religions, social and cultural values, and arts of Asia. Students pursuing the Asian studies minor may take courses in a broad range of subject areas, including history, art, communications, business, political science, film, literature, religion, Chinese and Japanese, and this interdisciplinary study of Asia provides students with an array of methodological approaches to facilitate comparative analysis and intercultural understanding and communication.

requirements

The minor requires a total of 21 credits, of which at least 12 credits must be upper-division. At least 12 credits should not duplicate course work taken towards the student’s major and other minor(s). An international experience in Asia (study travel, international internship) is strongly encouraged and a culminating senior project is required of all students to complete the minor.

core requirements (9 credits)

AS  150

Asian Connections: Introduction to Asian Studies

3

HIST 190

From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia

3

AS 498

Directed Senior Project in Asian Studies

3

four of the following (12 credits, at least 9 credits must be upper-dvision)

lower-division

REL 115 

Living Religions of the World

3

ART 117

Ceramics of China, Korea and Japan

3

HIST 220

The Vietnam Wars

3

HIST 262

History of the Samurai

3

ART 264

Arts of India, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia

3

HIST 264

Empire and War in East Asia:  History and Memory

3

ART 265

Exchange and Evolution in the Arts of China and Japan

3

upper-division

POSC 324

Asian Politics

3

REL 335

Hinduism and the Religions of India

3

REL 336

Buddhism

3

HIST 352 

Chinese Civilization

3

HIST 354 

From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan

3

HIST 355

Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia

3

ART 374

Change and Exchange in the Contemporary Arts of China, Korea and Japan

3

ART 375

Change and Exchange in the Contemporary Arts of South Asia, the Middle East and Southeast Asia

3

COM 411

Communication in the Global Workplace

3

FTV 443a

Advanced Topics in World Cinema: Asian Cinema

3

JPN 478

Japanese History and Civilization (taught in Japanese)

3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Environmental Studies

The environmental studies minor is designed to offer students a sound foundation in the scientific, political and cultural approaches to studying the environment. Students electing the environmental studies minor may study in a broad range of subject areas, including sociology, economics, philosophy, and political science.

Students electing the environmental studies minor must take 21 credits. These 21 credits include two required core courses and any combination of elective courses chosen among the approved list for the environmental studies minor. At least 9 credits should not be duplicated with the course work taken towards the student 's major. In addition, a minimum of 9 credits must be at the upper-division level.

core requirements (6 credits)

ENV 101

Introduction to Environmental Science

3

ENV 102

Introduction to Environmental Policy

3

five of the following (15 credits)

ENV 112

Introduction to Hazards and Global Environmental Change

3

FSN 201

International Nutrition: The World Food Crisis

3

ENV 227

Darwin and the Galapagos

4

SOC 300

Society, Organizations, and Leadership

3

PHIL 303

Environmental Ethics

3

POSC 335

Political Economy

3

SOC 335

Society and the Environment

3

POSC 346

Environmental Law

3

ENG 374

Environmental Rhetoric

3

POSC 374

Environmental Politics and Policy

3

POSC 375

Public Policy Process

3

ECON 465

Environmental and Natural Resources Economics

3

ENV 490

Independent Internship (in Environmental Policy)

1–3

ENV 499

Environmental Research

1–3

total credits

 

21

Minor in Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies

From queer theory to queer–bashing, sexual diversity issues have become highly visible issues across business, the humanities, and the sciences. The minor in lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender/queer studies offers students the opportunity to analyze for themselves facts, theories, research, and realities concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, communities, and histories. Representing Chapman University's commitment to diversity and intellectual inquiry, the minor provides students of almost any major the means to explore the issues surrounding this academic discipline in its scientific, socio–cultural, political, and artistic contexts. In addition to supplementing academic specializations ranging from history or biology to English or psychology, the minor can also serve students preparing for careers in law, public policy, health and social services, the arts, entertainment, or the ministry.

The minor requires a total of 18 credits, at least 9 of which must be upper–division, distributed as outlined below.

core requirements (6 credits)

HUM 205

Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Studies

3

PSY 344

Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

3

three of the following (9 credits)

SOC 281

Sociology of Sex and Gender

3

POSC 309

Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society

3

COM 311

Gender and Communication

3

PHIL 319

Philosophy of Women/Women of Color

3

FTV 321

The Documentary Tradition*

3

PSY 340

Human Sexuality

3

ENG 347

Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Society, Culture, and Literature: The Literature of the Gay and Lesbian Experience

3

SOC 410

Victimless Crimes

3

FTV 444c

Advanced Topics in Film Studies: Gay and Lesbian Cinema

3

*FTV 321 can count toward the minor, when the current iteration of the course contains a substantial LGBTQ component.

elective (3 credits)

selected from the lists of choices above, or with approval of program director

3

total credits

 

18

For information about the minor in LGBTQ studies, including additional options that fulfill requirements, such as independent studies, (IELP) Individualized Experiential Learning Projects, or independent research opportunities with the Henley Social Sciences Research Laboratory, contact the program director, Dr. Kevin O'Brien, via e-mail at obrien@chapman.edu.

Minor in Latin American Studies

The Latin American studies minor is designed to offer students a sound general educational foundation in Latin American history, culture, society, and politics, and the Spanish language. Students electing the Latin American studies minor may study in a broad range of subject areas, including Spanish, anthropology, sociology, history, peace studies, and political science.

The minor requires a total of 18 credits, at least 9 of which must be upper–division, distributed as outlined below. At least 12 credits should not be duplicated with course work taken towards the student's major and other minor(s). Students pursuing the Latin American studies minor are strongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program, internship, or travel course involving a Latin American country.

Students majoring in Spanish may declare a minor in Latin American studies except that the courses that satisfy the major do not double-count towards the minor.

core requirements (9 credits)

HIST 180

Modern Latin American History, or

 

SPAN 202

Intermediate Spanish II

3

POSC 327

Latin American Politics

3

ANTH 361

Conflict and Social Change in Latin America

3

three of the following ( 9 credits)

ANTH 230

Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

HIST 230

Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865

3

HIST 258

Latin American History Through Film

3

SPAN 326

Reading and Interpreting Literature

3

ANTH 330

Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas

3

SPAN 343

Advanced Grammar and Composition

3

SPAN 344

Spanish Writing Workshop

3

SPAN 345

Spanish Conversation

3

SOC 346

Solving Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country

3

ANTH 360

North and Middle American Indians

3

ANTH 363

African-Caribbean History and Culture

3

SPAN 377

Literature and Culture of Latin America I

3

SPAN 378

Literature and Culture of Latin America II

3

HIST 392

Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin America

3

HIST 396

Mexican History

3

SPAN 396

Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

3

SPAN 397

United States Latino Literatures and Cultures

3

SPAN 398

20th Century Latin American Fiction: Journeys Across Memory

3

SPAN 440

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism

3

SPAN 441

Spanish Phonetics and Phonology

3

total credits

 

18

Minor in Women's Studies

The women's and gender studies minor provides an overview of the interdisciplinary approaches to the study of women and gender inequality; cultural representations of women and their social roles; and the social axes of gender, race, class and sexuality. The minor provides students with a broad, interdisciplinary framework for analyzing social practices related to gender as well as the impact on their own lives.

The minor requires a total of 18 credits, at least 9 of which must be upper–division, distributed as outlined below.

core requirements (6 credits)

WMST 101

Introduction to Women's Studies

3

WMST 498

Women's Studies Senior Seminar

3

four of the following (12 credits)

HUM 200

Women's Realities

3

SOC 204

Marriage and the Family

3

HIST 224

United States Women's History

3

HIST 226

Modern European Women's History

3

HIST 230

Chicano/a History and Culture to 1865

3

HIST 231

Chicano/a History and Culture, 1848-present

3

AT 261

Women in Sport

3

HIST 273

Bold Mamas and Audacious Entrepreneurs: Women and Power in the African Past

3

SOC 281

Sociology of Sex and Gender

3

POSC 309

Sexual Politics in a Diverse Society

3

COM 311

Gender and Communication

3

LEAD 315

The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity Issues in the Workplace

3

REL 316

Genesis and Gender

3

POSC 318

Women and Politics

3

PHIL 319

Philosophy of Women/Women of Color

3

REL 330

Women and Religion

3

POSC 336

The Global and the Local

3

HIST 342

The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life and Death

3

ENG 347

Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies (Postcolonial Women Writers)

3

SOC 347

Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies (Postcolonial Women Writers)

3

SOC 350

Gender in a Global Perspective

3

ART 351

Art and Gender in Antiquity: Women's Beauty and Men's Power in Greek and Roman Art

3

PSY 355

Diversity in Marital and Family Relationships

3

SOC 382

Women, Health and Healing

3

SOC 385

Medical Sociology

3

FREN 386

Images of Leadership in French Literature: Women Writers Across the Ages

3

LEAD 396

Gender and Leadership

3

SOC 410

Victimless Crimes

3

ENG 445

Major Authors (Virginia Woolf)

3

ART 464

Gender, Art, and Western Culture

3

PSY 495

Topics in Applied Psychology (Psychology of Women)

3

Students may take one of the following in place of one of the preceding required four courses:

HUM 205

Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Studies

3

PSY 340

Human Sexuality

3

PSY 344

Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Psychology

3

FTV 444c

Advanced Topics in Film Studies: Gay and Lesbian Cinema

3

total credits

 

18

Course Descriptions – Asian Studies

AS 150 Asian Connections: Introduction to Asian Studies

This course provides a general introduction to Asia as a dynamic nexus of relations from interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives. It explores Asia’s varied humanistic traditions, the trajectory of modern Asia, and its role in globalization. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

AS 498 Directed Senior Project in Asian Studies

Prerequisites, AS 150, HIST 190. This course is designed to allow students to integrate and advance their knowledge about Asia and Asian Studies in pursuit of a more sophisticated understanding of and engagement with Asia. Directed by a given Asian Studies faculty member whose expertise matches given students' interest. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – Humanities

HUM 129 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HUM 199 Individual Study

(Offered every semester.) 3–6 credits.

HUM 200 Women's Realities

An introduction to women's studies as an academic discipline and a critical analysis of the traditional views of women as individuals, members of families, and societies. The perspective is historical as well as cross–cultural. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

HUM 205 Introduction to Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Studies

An introductory survey covering psychological and biological theories of orientation, the historical and anthropological record of sexuality and affection in both Western and non–Western societies, the legal and political history of homosexual movements, and religious teachings on homosexuality. Attention will also be given to the role of lesbian/gay/bi–Sexual artists in the history and theory of the arts. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

HUM 229 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HUM 290 Intern Program

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HUM 316 From Latin America to Los Angeles: Culture and Ways of Life

An introduction to the various cultures of Latin America with special attention to history, literature, and popular cultures. The course also explores the many complexities of U.S. Latino/Chicano/a cultures and their vital contributions to California and the United States. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HUM 318 Contemporary German–Speaking Cultures

Tracing the historical development of the German–speaking areas, this course will examine the interaction of the German–speaking cultures both economically and politically with their European neighbors, especially since reunification. Taught in English. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

HUM 350 Cities and Civilization

From today's Los Angeles to classical Athens, cities have shaped and transformed Western civilization. Utilizing technology, this multi–disciplinary course investigates contemporary Los Angeles and its urban predecessors, such as Athens, Paris, London, and Vienna, as crossroads of cultural change. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

HUM 351 The Holocaust in German Literature and Film

(Same as GER 351.)

HUM 353B Topics in Historical Tours: A Literary History of the French Riviera and Provence

(Same as FREN 353B.)

HUM 355 Crucibles of Civilization

This course enables students to travel to Athens, Vienna, and London to experience first-hand the creativity that emerged at key moments in each of these urban environments and that profoundly influenced western civilization. Students will connect their knowledge of the achievements that occurred in 5th century Athens, 19th century Vienna, and Victorian London with specific locations in each city. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

HUM 399 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

HUM 499 Individual Study

(Offered as needed.) 1–6 credits.

Course Descriptions – Women's Studies

WMST 101 Introduction to Women's Studies

This course introduces students to the field of women's studies, an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental area of inquiry that applies feminist theories in examining women's own perspectives of their diverse experiences. Students explore the intersection of gender with other social categories such as ethnicity, race, class, sexuality, and cultural difference. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

WMST 300 Women in Leadership

Women in Leadership offers an intensive analysis of women in leadership roles through historical, economical, and sociological survey and examine stereotypes of male and female leadership styles, roles and abilities. The course will center on a lecture series from speakers with a range of leadership styles and milieu such as political, corporate, military, civic, celebrity and community leadership positions. The course will offer comparisons of male and female stereotypes related to leadership styles, roles, and abilities. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

WMST 329 Experimental Course

Upper-division topics course for new offerings. May be repeated for credit if different topic. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

WMST 399 Individual Study

Prerequisites, WMST 101, junior standing, consent of instructor. Individual study and research is offered to students to research particular topics that are not provided for by regular curriculum offerings. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

WMST 498 Women's Studies Senior Seminar

Prerequisites, WMST 101, senior standing, or consent of instructor. Students will explore feminist theory as social, cultural, and political critique, and feminist methodology as ways of knowing about the world and women's lives. Students will examine current debates in feminist theory and consider knowledge in the disciplines, how such knowledge is traditionally produced and used, as well as how it is resisted and reconstituted through feminist inquiry. This course is the capstone experience for the women's studies minor. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.