Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Patrick Fuery, Ph.D., Dean

Eric Chimenti, M.F.A., Associate Dean

Ann Gordon, Ph.D., Associate Dean

Master of Arts in English

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Dual Degree Program: Master of Arts in English and Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Master of Arts in International Studies

Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication

Wilkinson College of Humanities and Social Sciences currently offers five master's level degrees: Master of Arts in English, Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, Dual Degree Program: Master of Arts in English and Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing, Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication and Master of Arts in International Studies. 

The M.A. in English is usually seen as a bridge to Ph.D. studies and faculty are exceptionally able to offer a background in a wide range of English studies. The program also recognizes that for some students the M.A. can be used for advancement in high school teaching or for employment at community colleges throughout the country. The M.A. degree is aimed at enabling students to receive the historical background, the writing confidence and the critical thinking skills to pursue careers in English or other humanistic endeavors.

The M.F.A. is a terminal degree in creative writing. Graduates from this program may choose to enter higher education and teach their craft or find careers in editing or publishing their own work. Faculty in this program are dedicated to fostering creative growth and maturity in our students. In brief, the M.F.A. prepares students for creative endeavors wherever they appear.

The dual degree in English and creative writing provides the opportunity for both the literary and the creative aspects of English to be learned and assimilated.

The M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication is a one–year accelerated program emphasizing the study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual, institutional and public audiences about important health issues. This graduate program aims to foster an understanding of the behavioral, psychological and social bases of health and requires students to engage in individual scholarship or team research of an interdisciplinary nature. The mission of the M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication is to help improve policy and decision–making through evidence–based research, analysis and application.

The M.A. in International Studies is a two–year, interdisciplinary course of study designed to train students seeking careers in the U.S. Foreign Service, the United Nations and its specialized agencies or international nongovernmental organizations. The program provides an integrative curriculum including political science, comparative sociology, economics with an emphasis on trade and development, social psychology, foreign languages and other related fields. The program is distinguished by overseas summer internships and an emphasis in the influence of cultural forces on international affairs.

Department of Communication Studies

Lisa Sparks, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Dickson, Jia, Miller–Day, Sparks;

Associate Professor: Bevan, Waldeck;

Assistant Professors: Dorros, Hefner, Kee, Levy, Tukachinsky;

Instructors: Davies, Liang.

Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication

4 + 1 Program B.A. in Communication Studies or B.A. in Strategic and Corporate Communication/M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication

The Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication graduate program aims to foster an understanding of the behavioral, psychological and social bases of health and requires students to engage in individual scholarship or team research of an interdisciplinary nature. Health and strategic communication is the study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual, institutional, community and public audiences about important health issues. Our mission is to help improve policy and decision–making through evidence–based research, analysis and application.

Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication

Admission deadlines

Review of applications will begin February 1 and late applications will be considered on a space available basis. Because the number of students admitted is limited, meeting the following minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Admission to the program

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. This must be documented by an official copy of a transcript showing the baccalaureate degree.
  2. Have an undergraduate cumulative grade point average of 3.300 or better.
  3. Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals who are directly knowledgeable of the applicant's professional and academic competence (at least one from an academic source).
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within the last five years with a minimum score of 153 on the verbal section, 144 on the quantitative section and a 4.5 on the analytical writing section. A score at or above 60 percent on any one of the Graduate Subject Tests is also accepted.
  5. Submit a 500–word essay addressing the communication area in which the applicant is interested.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication degree

The core courses educate students in human communication theory and methodology as related to applied contexts, whereas advanced specialized content and elective courses provide opportunities for application by putting research into practice.

Complete 30 credits as listed below. Students enrolled in the Bachelor Science in Health Sciences–health communication track may complete up to 12 credits of the required graduate course work in their senior year. Up to 12 credits that satisfy the undergraduate major or the 124 credits required for the bachelor degree may also double count towards the requirements of the graduate program.

core courses (15 credits)

HCOM 570

Theories of Interpersonal Communication

3

HCOM 580

Theories of Health Communication

3

HCOM 582

Health Communication Campaigns

3

HCOM 595

Research Methodology

3

HCOM 598

Community–Based Health Interventions Capstone Research

3

specialized content courses (15 credits)

fifteen credits from the following

HCOM 585

Training and Consulting in Healthcare Contexts

3

HCOM 596

Special Topics in Research Methodology

6

HCOM 597

Special Topics in Health and Risk Communication

6

HCOM 599

Individual Study in Health and Risk Communication

3

With approval of the graduate director, students may take up to six credits of specialized content in courses outside the department.

total credits

 

30

4 + 1 Program B.A. in Communication Studies or B.A. in Strategic and Corporate Communication/M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication

The M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication program and the B.A. programs for the Department of Communication Studies offer a 4 + 1 program option for undergraduate students that enables them to begin taking M.S. course work and/or apply upper–division undergraduate course work in their senior year and receive a master of science degree within one year of finishing their undergraduate studies (4 years B.A. + 1 year M.S.).

The 4 + 1 option is available to students pursuing the B.A. in Communication Studies or the B.A. in Strategic and Corporate Communication. This program guarantees excellent students a seat in Chapman University’s Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication program and makes them eligible for scholarship money awarded to outstanding, incoming master’s students.

Chapman students can apply to the M.S. program as early as the spring semester of their junior year. Students will receive conditional admission to the program, pending completion of their B.A. degree. If accepted to the M.S. program, students can take up to 12 upper–division credits from communication studies or strategic and corporate communication degree requirements during their senior year as an undergraduate student and/or:

HCOM 596

Special Topics in Research Methodology (topics vary)

HCOM 597

Special Topics in Health and Risk Communication (topics vary)

These credits can be used to satisfy both the undergraduate graduation requirements and count toward the M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication. Other communication studies or strategic and corporate communication courses not listed here can be approved by the director of the M.S. in Health and Strategic Communication and the chair of the Department of Communication Studies.

Admission procedures

Students eligible for early guaranteed admission into Chapman University’s Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication program must meet the following criteria.

  1. Completion of the following B.A. Communication Studies core courses: COM 100, 101, 110, 151, 210, 211, 312 and 314 by the end of the spring semester of their junior year. These courses:
  2. Before October 1 of the junior year, the student seeking guaranteed, early admission must schedule an interview with graduate director, Dr. Lisa Sparks (sparks@chapman.edu) and graduate manager for Health and Strategic Communication Allison Tritch at (714) 997–6752 (tritch@chapman.edu) to review requirements and establish a plan to complete successfully the requirements for early guaranteed admission.

Students meeting the stated requirements will be admitted to the health and strategic communication program in the early fall of their senior year on a conditional basis until the following criteria for admission are complete.

Course Descriptions – Health Communication

HCOM 570 Theories of Interpersonal Communication

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. This course provides a general overview of theoretical approaches informing much contemporary research on human communication. The course covers the major approaches to interpersonal communication, the phenomena on which these approaches tend to focus, the advantages and limitations of each approach, and the type of empirical research methods employed by each approach. Students also learn to develop effective and culturally-appropriate interpersonal based intervention strategies for members of diverse contexts or cultures. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HCOM 580 Theories of Health Communication

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. This course explores important theories that guide health communication research and practice. In this course students will be exposed to theories drawn from health communication, health education and promotion and public health as such theories relate and apply to health outcomes, including examination of the role of communication in health care delivery, health promotion and disease prevention, risk communication, as well as in promoting personal and psychosocial well being. The course cuts across multiple levels of communication, different communication channels, and the use of diverse communication media and technologies. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HCOM 582 Health Communication Campaigns

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. This course explores interpersonal and media based communication campaigns to promote health and reduce health risks, including examining how health communication campaigns are designed, implemented, and evaluated, and describing the critical role of communication research throughout the campaign process. This course will also examine persuasive messages used in the areas of cancer communication science, health literacy, health risk communication, health beliefs, public relations and health crises, and how the media and Internet present health information. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

HCOM 585 Training and Consulting in Healthcare Contexts

Prerequisites, COM 410, or equivalent, and admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. Course orients students to the fields of training and consulting as communication professions with unique application in the healthcare context. Introduces students to the skills needed by the trainer/consultant, stages of the consulting process, and the role of organizational communication theory in consulting. Students will gain experience identifying and diagnosing communication problems within the healthcare setting through needs assessment and data analysis, and gain proficiency in the design and delivery of appropriate training interventions and evaluation. Special emphasis on the growing role of advanced communication and information technologies, such as online learning communities, in organizational training and development. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

HCOM 595 Research Methodology

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. This course provides students with an understanding of a social scientific approach to health communication and health behavior research. Students will learn the basic tools to do their own research and how to critically read and evaluate published research in health communication and related areas. The course will cover different methods of research to investigate the social world. The course takes students through the entire research process, from the development of research questions and hypotheses, through gathering data, analyzing that data (rather briefly), and drawing conclusions, to the development and testing of theory. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

HCOM 596 Special Topics in Research Methodology

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. The purpose of each special topics course seminar is to give students an understandable introduction to various complex methodological tools used in health and strategic communication research (and social sciences) such as survey research, focus groups and interviewing, content analysis, factor analysis, etc. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HCOM 597 Special Topics in Health and Risk Communication

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of instructor. The purpose of each special topics course seminar is to provide an in-depth examination of various important issues in health risk and strategic communication research. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

HCOM 598 Community-Based Health Interventions Capstone Research

Prerequisites, HCOM 570, 580, 582, 595, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program. This capstone course serves as a final research seminar for graduate students nearing the completion of their degrees. Prior to enrolling in this course, students have gained a strong foundation in theories of interpersonal and health communication and have been challenged to think about the opportunities they might pursue in the application of this theoretical knowledge. In addition, students have been challenged to investigate their particular interests through their work in elective courses, both within and outside the department. In this capstone course students will take the final step: the completion of an independent research project that makes a significant contribution to the field of health communication. (Offered summer semester.) 3 credits.

HCOM 599 Individual Study in Health and Risk Communication

Prerequisite, admittance to the Master of Science in Health and Strategic Communication Program, or consent of director. This course provides students with the opportunity to perform an in-depth examination of various important issues in health risk and strategic communication research. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

Department of English

Joanna Levin, Ph.D., Chair

Professors: Axelrod, Bausch, Fuery, Gunner, Nakell, Paterno, Quinn, Ruppel, Yeager;

Associate Professors: Blaylock, Leahy, Lehnhof, Levin, O'Brien, Zoellner;

Assistant Professors: Glaser, Hall, Jankowski, Lewis, Magosaki, Osborn, Van Meter;

Instructors: Kozameh, Sweet;

Lecturer: Read–Davidson.

Master of Arts in English

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Dual Degree Program: Master of Arts in English and Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The mission of the Department of English is to exemplify and encourage the ability to think creatively and critically, to express ideas with clarity and intellectual rigor, to develop a detailed knowledge of several cultural traditions and to foster the desire to explore related fields of study, such as psychology, history, philosophy, linguistics, sociology and religious studies. The department provides Chapman students with innovative and rigorous instruction in critical thinking and writing skills, in–depth knowledge of the world's literary traditions and a basis for lifelong learning in an interdisciplinary context.

Master of Arts in English

The Master of Arts in English is designed for students seeking continuing education, a foundation for doctoral work (Ph.D., Ed.D., J.D.) and/or a credential qualifying them to teach literature and composition courses at junior and community colleges.

Prerequisites

Students seeking admission to the program must have a baccalaureate degree in English or a related field from an accredited institution. In certain cases, students may be required to complete specific prerequisites before or during their first year of enrollment.

Admission

Students seeking admission to the program must submit the following materials:

  1. A statement of intent outlining the applicant's accomplishments, abilities, preparation and intended program of study. The statement should not exceed three to four pages.
  2. An official transcript from all undergraduate and postgraduate degree granting institutions.
  3. Two letters of recommendation that speak to the applicant's academic preparation, intellectual ability and aptitude for postgraduate study.
  4. A finished critical literary essay of minimum of 20 text pages that demonstrates the applicant's talent for scholarly writing and ability to handle critical texts relative to the subject matter. The essay should reflect a grasp of critical literary skills and ability to deal with theoretical texts in an effective and knowledgeable manner.

Students seeking admission may also submit recent scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the GRE Subject Test in English. Scores from one of these exams are mandatory for applicants with a GPA less than 3.000.

Application review

Review of applications for fall semester admission begins on November 1.

Review of applications for spring semester admission begins on May 1.

Transfer policy

Students admitted to the M.A. program with an earned master's degree in literature may transfer up to six credits of graduate course work upon approval of a petition by the program coordinator and the dean of the school. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for transfer policies.)

Thesis review and completion

Master of arts students must prepare and defend, under the direction of an individual faculty member, a thesis project of distinction in order to complete the degree (please see Department of English Graduate Handbook for additional guidelines). The thesis project must be completed, reviewed and accepted before a student may participate in graduation. A copy of the thesis project and the committee's evaluative report must be filed with the Department of English office. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 "B" to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the thesis preparation class. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines.)

Continuous enrollment fee

Students who have previously registered for the thesis/project but who have not completed the requirements, are required to submit a continuous enrollment fee for each semester the thesis/project remains outstanding. The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the thesis/project.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in English degree

requirements (6 credits)

ENG 556

Literary Theory and Critical Practice: 1920–the Present

3

ENG 597B

MA Thesis

3

ten of the following (30 credits)

ENG 500

Advanced Topics in Rhetoric and Composition

3

ENG 503

Techniques in Writing Fiction

3

ENG 507

Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

3

ENG 509

Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

3

ENG 520

American Literature before 1870

3

ENG 521

Humanities Computing

3

ENG 522

American Literature from 1870 to 1950

3

ENG 524

American Literature Since 1950

3

ENG 529

Experimental Course

3

ENG 530

Medieval Literature

3

ENG 531

Early Modern Literature

3

ENG 532

Shakespeare

3

ENG 533

Restoration and 18th Century Literature

3

ENG 534

Romantic Literature

3

ENG 535

Victorian Literature

3

ENG 536

Modern British Literature

3

ENG 545

Major Authors

3

ENG 546

Special Studies in Literature

3

ENG 547

Topics in Comparative Literature

3

ENG 550

Theories of Fiction

3

ENG 555

Shakespeare in England

3

ENG 580

Teaching Composition

3

ENG 581

Theory and Practice of Writing Tutoring and Conferencing

3

ENG 584

Introduction to the Digital Humanities

3

ENG 594

Seminar: Problems in Literary Analysis

3

ENG 596

Seminar: Film and Literary Studies

3

ENG 599

Independent Study in Literature or Language

3

total credits

 

36

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree in creative writing. Many M.F.A. graduates teach at two– and four–year colleges, publish their work or go on to professional careers in writing and editing. The M.F.A. program at Chapman fosters the growth of fiction writers and poets through workshops, techniques courses, literature courses, the John Fowles Reading Series, Tabula Poetica: Poetry at Chapman University and the literary journal Calliope.

Prerequisites

Students seeking admission to the program must have a baccalaureate degree in English or a related field from an accredited institution. In certain cases, students may be required to complete specific prerequisites before or during their first year of enrollment.

Admission

Students seeking admission to the program must submit the following materials:

  1. A statement of intent outlining the applicant's accomplishments, abilities, preparation and intended program of study. The statement should not exceed three to four pages.
  2. An official transcript from all undergraduate and postgraduate degree granting institutions.
  3. Two letters of recommendation that speak to the accomplishments and potential of the applicant as a writer and student of literary studies.
  4. A non–returnable portfolio of creative work that best represents the applicant's style and demonstrates potential. The portfolio should include a minimum of either 25 pages of fiction or 20 pages of poetry. Be advised that the purpose of the portfolio is to demonstrate the applicant's creative potential as an M.F.A. student.

Application review

Review of applications for fall semester admission begins on November 1.

Review of applications for spring semester admission begins on May 1.

To be considered for merit scholarships, applications must be received by January 1.

Transfer policy

Students admitted to the M.F.A. program with an earned master's degree in literature may transfer up to six credits of graduate course work upon approval of a petition by the program coordinator and the dean of the college. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for transfer policies.)

Nine credit assessment review

After the completion of nine credits of study, M.F.A. students will submit to the director of the creative writing program a portfolio of no fewer than three works of prose fiction (either stories or chapters) or a collection of no fewer than 15 poems or a combination of fiction and poetry totaling a minimum of 30 pages. The portfolio should contain the student's best work and will be used for the purposes of early student assessment.

Thesis review and completion

M.F.A. students must prepare and defend a book–length thesis project of distinction in fiction or poetry to complete the degree. (With the approval of the graduate program director, a thesis may be done in creative nonfiction, stage drama or screenplay.) The thesis project must be completed, reviewed and accepted before a student may participate in graduation. The thesis committee must consist of at least two full–time English faculty, who must be provided with the thesis at least one month prior to the scheduled defense. A copy of the thesis project and the committee's evaluative report must be filed with the Department of English office.

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 "B" to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the thesis preparation class. (See the Academic Policies and Procedures section for additional guidelines.)

Continuous enrollment fee

Students who have previously registered for the thesis/project but who have not completed the requirements, are required to submit a continuous enrollment fee for each semester the thesis/project remains outstanding. The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the thesis/project.

Requirements for the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing degree

requirements (21 credits)

ENG 503

Techniques in Writing Fiction or

3

ENG 504

Techniques in Poetry Writing

 

ENG 505*

Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing and/or

12

ENG 506*

Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction and/or

 

ENG 519*

Advanced Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

 

ENG 587

Aspects of a Writer

3

ENG 597A

MFA Thesis

3

*ENG 505, 506 and 519 are repeatable for credit. Taken in any combination for a total of 12 credits.

five of the following (15 credits)

ENG 500

Advanced Topics in Rhetoric and Composition

3

ENG 507

Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

3

ENG 509

Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

3

ENG 520

American Literature before 1870

3

ENG 521

Humanities Computing

3

ENG 522

American Literature from 1870 to 1950

3

ENG 524

American Literature Since 1950

3

ENG 529

Experimental Course

3

ENG 530

Medieval Literature

3

ENG 531

Early Modern Literature

3

ENG 532

Shakespeare

3

ENG 533

Restoration and 18th Century Literature

3

ENG 534

Romantic Literature

3

ENG 535

Victorian Literature

3

ENG 536

Modern British Literature

3

ENG 545

Major Authors

3

ENG 546

Special Studies in Literature

3

ENG 547

Topics in Comparative Literature

3

ENG 550

Theories of Fiction

3

ENG 551

Theories of Poetry

3

ENG 555

Shakespeare in England

3

ENG 556

Literary Theory and Critical Practice: 1920–Present

3

ENG 580

Teaching Composition

3

ENG 581

Theory and Practice of Writing Tutoring and Conferencing

3

ENG 584

Introduction to Digital Humanities

3

ENG 594

Seminar: Problems in Literary Analysis

3

ENG 596

Seminar: Film and Literary Studies

3

ENG 598A

MFA Thesis II

1

ENG 599

Independent Study in Literature or Language

3

total credits

 

36

Dual Degree Program: Master of Arts in English and Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The dual degree combines the Master of Arts and the Master of Fine Arts. It was created for students who wish to combine the practice and study of creative writing with literary scholarship. The dual degree is designed for students who intend to pursue a career in teaching English and creative writing at the university, community college or secondary–school level.

Dual degree students must:

  1. Be admitted to both degree programs.
  2. Be enrolled concurrently in both programs.
  3. Complete all requirements for each degree program, including the thesis for the M.A. and the M.F.A.
  4. Students already enrolled in either the M.A. or the M.F.A. must apply and be admitted to the dual degree program before completing a maximum of 27 credits of study.
  5. Dual degree students wishing to receive one diploma before the other must complete a minimum of 36 credits and the comprehensive examination (for the M.A.) or the thesis (for the M.F.A.).

Requirements for the Dual Degree Program: Master of Arts in English and Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

Students must complete 54 credits, at least 42 credits must be in residence.

requirements (27 credits)

ENG 503

Techniques in Writing Fiction or

3

ENG 504

Techniques in Poetry Writing

 

ENG 505*

Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing and/or

12

ENG 506*

Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction and/or

 

ENG 519*

Advanced Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

 

ENG 556

Literary Theory and Critical Practice: 1920–Present

3

ENG 587

Aspects of a Writer

3

ENG 597A

MFA Thesis

3

ENG 597B

MA Thesis

3

*ENG 505, 506 and 519 are repeatable for credit. Taken in any combination for a total of 12 credits.

nine of the following (27 credits)

ENG 500

Advanced Topics in Rhetoric and Composition

3

ENG 507

Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

3

ENG 509

Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

3

ENG 520

American Literature before 1870

3

ENG 521

Humanities Computing

3

ENG 522

American Literature from 1870 to 1950

3

ENG 524

American Literature Since 1950

3

ENG 529

Experimental Course

3

ENG 530

Medieval Literature

3

ENG 531

Early Modern Literature

3

ENG 532

Shakespeare

3

ENG 533

Restoration and 18th Century Literature

3

ENG 534

Romantic Literature

3

ENG 535

Victorian Literature

3

ENG 536

Modern British Literature

3

ENG 546

Special Studies in Literature

3

ENG 547

Topics in Comparative Literature

3

ENG 550

Theories of Fiction

3

ENG 551

Theories of Poetry

3

ENG 555

Shakespeare in England

3

ENG 580

Teaching Composition

3

ENG 581

Theory and Practice of Writing Tutoring and Conferencing

3

ENG 584

Introduction to Digital Humanities

3

ENG 594

Seminar: Problems in Literary Analysis

3

ENG 596

Seminar: Film and Literary Studies

3

ENG 598A

MFA Thesis II

1

ENG 599

Independent Study in Literature or Language

3

total credits

 

54

Course Descriptions – English

ENG 500 Advanced Topics in Rhetoric and Composition

Prerequisite, graduate standing at Chapman University. An opportunity for in-depth study, this course may focus on a single theme, historical period, or group of rhetoricians. Possible topics include Early Rhetoric (Greek, Roman, early Christian, medieval and scholastic; Meso-American); Chinese Rhetorics; History of Rhetoric from the English Renaissance to Today; the Rhetoric of the American Slavery Debate; History of Women Rhetoricians; the Rhetoric of Technology; Queer Rhetorics; Chicana/o Rhetorics; World Englishes; Disability Studies and Composition. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 503 Techniques in Writing Fiction

Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing at Chapman University. Students learn the basic techniques necessary to produce publishable fiction. Course may vary by genre from semester to semester. Techniques of fiction may include plot development, viewpoint selection, three-dimensional characterization, effective dialogue, scene and summary, settings, and theme. Lecture and workshop combined. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 504 Techniques in Poetry Writing

Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing at Chapman University. Students learn, practice, and analyze the basic techniques necessary to write and revise poetry and to understand their options as members of the larger community of poets. Course topics may vary from year to year. Techniques of poetry may include sound, voice, imagery, metaphor, narrative, traditional forms, and writing processes. Lecture and workshop combined. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 505 Advanced Workshop in Poetry Writing

Students discuss, critique, and revise their writing in order to produce poems for submission to literary journals and poetry publishers. Students examine the conventions of various forms, poetry movements, and individual poets to determine the areas within they choose to work. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 506 Advanced Workshop in Writing Fiction

Students discuss, criticize, and evaluate their writing in order to produce a publishable work. Students work within their chosen genre and form, and the guidelines of various genres and forms are examined. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 507 Literary Forum: Tabula Poetica Poetry Reading Series

Prerequisite, admission to the MA in English, MFA in creative writing, or the dual degree program. Literary Forum studies four contemporary poets and their work in conjunction with a lecture and reading series sponsored by Tabula Poetica: Poetry at Chapman University. Lectures and readings are conducted by poets held every year during the fall semester, and the course reading, analysis, and writing assignments are based on the visiting writers' works. In addition, students enrolled in this course present a poetry reading and/or lecture. This course will focus not only on the series' writers, but on contemporary poetry in general, incorporating work beyond American when appropriate. May be repeated for credit. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 509 Literary Forum: John Fowles Center Contemporary Writers Core

Prerequisite, admission to the MA in English, MFA in creative writing, or the dual degree program. Literary Forum studies six contemporary authors and their work in conjunction with a lecture and reading series sponsored by the John Fowles Center for Creative Writing. Lectures and/or readings conducted by novelists, poets, critics, screenwriters, and creative non-fiction writers held every year during the spring semester and the reading and analysis assignments are based on the visiting writers' works. This course will focus not only on the series' writers, but on contemporary writing in general both in the Americas and in Europe. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 512 TAB: A Journal of Poetry and Poetics

Prerequisites, ENG 504, 505, or consent of instructor. Students learn the editing, production, and publicity cycles of an online/print journal. Students are trained to participate in the evaluation of submitted manuscripts of poems and poetics, in the design and production of the online and print issues, and in the dissemination of the published issues. Additional practice in website maintenance and other related professionalization may be included. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 513 Major Directors and/or Screenwriters

A seminar designed to approach major film directors and/or screenwriters and the films and scripts associated with their work. Some directors, such as Luis Buñuel, worked closely with specific screenwriters (e.g. Jean-Claude Carrière) and in that sense both film and script will be discussed. In other situations, such as with Jean-Luc Godard and Federico Fellini, the director may also have been the writer. In some cases, we may focus on the work of a particular screenwriter such as Waldo Salt (Midnight Cowboy) or Buck Henry (The Graduate). Regardless, the course would focus on one particular director or screenwriter in an attempt to critically analyze their work from an aesthetic perspective. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 519 Advanced Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

Prerequisite, graduate standing. Students discuss, criticize, and evaluate their writing in order to produce a publishable work. Students work within their chosen genre and form, and the guidelines of various genres and forms are examined. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 520 American Literature before 1870

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. This course examines the "American Renaissance," with particular attention to critical assessment of major themes and authors: Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 521 Humanities Computing

An graduate-level introduction to the digital humanities that blends theory and practice in computing for humanities disciplines. Students explore the current state of digital humanities research, the history and future of games, the rise and current iterations of new media, and fundamental principles of computing. This course is appropriate for all majors and minors, especially those in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 522 American Literature from 1870 to 1950

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English, or consent of instructor. The course will survey the Modernist period (from the late 1800s to the 1940s). Authors studied may include Twain, James, Chesnutt, Dreiser, Wharton, Frost, Stein, Eliot, W. C. Williams, Hemingway, Larsen, Faulkner, O'Neill, West, Hurston, Wilder, Chandler, Wright, and T. Williams. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 524 American Literature Since 1950

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. Students study contemporary American fiction, drama, and poetry in the postmodern tradition. Authors most frequently covered include Ellison, Baldwin, Updike, Bellow, Barth, Vonnegut, Didion, Beatty, Piercy, Sexton, Williams, Miller, and Shepherd. (Offered every third semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 525 Graduate and Professional ESL

Advanced instruction in English as a second language for graduate and professional students from throughout the University. Students will review representative examples of academic and professional writing, and complete assignments designed to assist students in modeling such writing. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 529 Experimental Course

(Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 530 Medieval Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. Students examine late medieval English literature. The course includes selections from Chaucer's Troilus and Creseyde, Piers Plowman, The Pearl, and other poems. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 531 Early Modern Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. Intensive study of significant themes, genres, and/or authors of the early modern era (ca. 1550-1700). Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 532 Shakespeare

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. An intensive study of approximately ten of Shakespeare's major works. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 533 Restoration and 18th Century Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. In this study of British literature and its social, political, psychological, and artistic influences from the restoration of Charles II to the death of Johnson, special attention is paid to the ways writers sought to express themselves through existing models, especially those of classical Greece and Rome, and such new forms as the novel. Authors may include: Defoe, Dryden, Addison, Steele, Pope, Fielding, Gray, Boswell, and Johnson. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 534 Romantic Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. In this in-depth study of the Romantic revolution in English literature, such diverse Romantic writers as Blake, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, and Byron and the social, philosophical, and artistic sensibilities that characterize this explosive age are explored. (Offered fall semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 535 Victorian Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. This course examines the intellectual and cultural trends of the literature of Victorian England. Attention is given to such intellectual forces as the Oxford Reform Movement, the Tractarian Movement, Darwinism, and aestheticism. Writers may include Carlyle, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, Newman, Mill, Eliot, Meredith, Swinburne, Wilde, and Hardy. (Offered spring semester, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 536 Modern British Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. A study of masterworks of British literary modernism and post-modernism, with emphasis on their origin and development, thematic and formal innovation, and cultural contexts and interchanges. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 540 Techniques in Screenwriting

Fundamentals of writing a feature screenplay including, but not limited to, character, plot, theme and dialogue. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 545 Major Authors

Prerequisite, admission to graduate standing at Chapman University. Students concentrate on the writings of either one significant author or a group of authors who can be profitably studied together. Examples of major figures include, but are not limited to, Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Keats, Dickens, Hawthorne, Melville, Pound, Eliot, Woolf, Joyce, Proust, Kazantzakis, and Faulkner. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 546 Special Studies in Literature

Students concentrate on one area - such as Restoration and 18th century drama or the epic poem. Credit may be arranged with an instructor for travel in a foreign country while studying the literature of that country. The travel-study courses, Experiencing England and the London Tour, are offered for ENG 546 credit. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every year.) 1-6 credits.

ENG 547 Topics in Comparative Literature

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English. In this course, students investigate significant themes or movements in comparative literature. Recent themes have included Poetics of the Novel; Writers Writing from the Margin; Women in Love and Other Emotional States. Courses that treat different themes may be repeated for credit. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 550 Theories of Fiction

Prerequisites, ENG 503, 506. The course will challenge the student not only to read both experimental fiction and theory, but to respond/react/write about the texts in experimental ways. The course is both a creative reading and a creative writing course. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 551 Theories of Poetry

Prerequisite, ENG 504, or 505. This course focuses on theoretical approaches to the reading and writing of poetry. Students will read poetry and theory, from the historical or traditional to the experimental or avant-garde, and will respond/react/write about these texts in critical and experimental ways. (Offered alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 555 Shakespeare in England

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This London-based travel course focuses on several of Shakespeare's works in print and in contemporary performance. Students will read, watch, and analyze between 8 and 12 plays while exploring the rich and vibrant city in which they were written and first enacted. Plays and venues vary, but often include productions at Shakespeare's Globe and at the National Theatre, as well as productions at Stratford-upon-Avon by the Royal Shakespeare Company. Fee: TBD. (Offered summer, alternate years.) 3 credits.

ENG 556 Literary Theory and Critical Practice: 1920-Present

Prerequisite, admission to graduate program of the department of English. Focusing on important critical questions (the social and political role of literature; the formation of a literary canon), students explore modern critical theories and methodologies, including New Criticism; Structuralism; Feminism, Gender and Sexuality Studies; New Historicism; Marxism; Psychoanalysis; Deconstruction; Multicultural and Post-Colonial Studies. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 580 Teaching Composition

Prerequisite, admission to graduate program of the department of English. Participants will practice various techniques for helping student writers compose rhetorically persuasive discourse, perfect diagnostic and editing skills, design whole courses and individual programs for improvement and enhancement, and validate students' progress. Students may visit current composition classes and/or observe writing tutoring sessions overseen by experienced Writing Center tutors. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 581 Theory and Practice of Writing Tutoring and Conferencing

Prerequisite, admission to the English MA, MFA, or MA/MFA programs. English 581 focuses on the theory and practice of writing conferences and writing center tutoring. Students in 581 will explore such topics as collaborative learning, social constructivist theories of composition, conference dynamics, tutoring strategies, the writing process, reflecting on writing conferences, discipline-specific writing, grammar as a rhetorical issue, responding to student writing, and the writing center's role in the university. As part of the course, students will observe and participate in work at Chapman's writing center. In addition to preparing students to tutor in a writing center, this course will also benefit students planning to teach composition in schools and colleges. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

ENG 584 Introduction to Digital Humanities

This graduate course will familiarize students with emerging technologies for text-based inquiry, research and expression. In addition to gaining an overview of the digital humanities, students will apply what they learn to the design of their own digital project. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 587 Aspects of a Writer

Becoming a writer and cultivating a writing life involves more than being able to put good words on a page. A range of secondary skills are necessary for survival in today’s literary marketplace. This class is a primer on the basic support tools you’ll find crucial to the practice and teaching of writing. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

ENG 590 Independent Internship

Students gain experience in the fields of business, industry or academe. Work assignments will relate to the major and may take place in law, editing and business offices, print production and retail firms, newspapers, libraries, schools, or brokerage companies. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–6 credits.

ENG 594 Seminar: Problems in Literary Analysis

Prerequisite, admission to graduate program of the department of English. Designed to introduce students to the exciting variety of advanced forms of literary study of particular authors, this course will demonstrate the uses and limitations of scholarship, criticism, and aesthetics as tools of literary understanding. May be repeated for credit with a different focus. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 596 Seminar: Film and Literary Studies

Prerequisite, admission to the graduate program of the department of English, or consent of instructor. In this advanced study of the processes by which literature is turned into film and in which film is examined as literature, students might study representative screenplays by such screenwriters as Dudley Nichols, Jules Furthman, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Robert Towne, Dorothy Parker, and William Faulkner, and the films of directors such as Welles, Fellini, Ford, and Hawks. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 597A MFA Thesis

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, 33 credits in the MFA program, (including concurrent coursework), and at least nine (9) credits of ENG 505 and/or 506 and/or 519. The thesis course is designed as the capstone experience of the MFA program and is required of all MFA candidates. The instructor serves as the candidate's thesis advisor during the completion of a novel, collection of short fiction, or collection of poems. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 597B MA Thesis

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, 33 credits in the MA program, (including concurrent coursework), and at least three (3) credits of ENG 556. The thesis course is designed as the capstone experience of the MA program and is required of all MA candidates. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

ENG 598A MFA Thesis II

Prerequisites, ENG 597A, consent of instructor. ENG 598A is required for candidates working to complete their MFA thesis if they are not enrolled in any other MFA electives. This course will fulfill the requirement to maintain continuous enrollment through completion of the MFA and allow access to university research resources needed to complete the thesis/project. Continuous enrollment required until completion of thesis/project. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

ENG 598B MA Thesis II

Prerequisites, ENG 597B, consent of instructor. ENG 598B is required for candidates working to complete their MA thesis if they are not enrolled in any other MA electives. This course will fulfill the requirement to maintain continuous enrollment through completion of the MA and allow access to university research resources needed to complete the thesis/project. Continuous enrollment required until completion of thesis/project. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

ENG 599 Independent Study in Literature or Language

Directed reading and/or research designed to meet specific needs of graduate students. (Offered every semester.) ½–6 credits.

ENG 682 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

International Studies Program

Lynn Horton, Ph.D., Director

Professors: Sfeir, Woldemikael;

Associate Professors: Badrinarayana, Carty, Horton, Hovsepian, Loustau, Martin;

Assistant Professors: Molle, Murphy.

Master of Arts in International Studies

The Master of Arts in International Studies is a professional degree designed to prepare graduates for careers in the international, non–profit sector. Students will have the credentials to apply for careers in the federal government, a non–government organization (NGO) or an intergovernmental organization. The M.A. in International Studies is a multidisciplinary degree including political science, comparative sociology, economics with an emphasis on trade and development, social psychology, foreign languages and other related fields.

Students follow a core curriculum and have a variety of electives they can take in development issues, political economy, social change and sustainable development.

Master of Arts in International Studies

Admission to the program and prerequisites

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Application to the Master of Arts in International Studies program.
  2. Official degree–granting transcripts from all undergraduate and postgraduate degree granting institutions.
  3. Achieve an acceptable score on the Graduate Admission Test (GRE). Suggested scores: 154 verbal, 147 quantitative and 4.0 analytical writing.
  4. Two letters of recommendation, including one from an academic source, which describe your professional and academic abilities.
  5. A 1000–word essay addressing your background and interest in the field of international studies.

Internship opportunities

All students are expected to perform an international internship between their first and second year of study. These internships give students exposure to life and work overseas, while providing them an introduction into the field to which they aspire. For example, students who hope to pursue a career in the NGO arena will participate in an international internship with an NGO.

Special topics

Additional special courses could be offered based on demand and faculty availability.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in International Studies degree

This is a cohort degree program. Students must complete 42 credits of academic work, demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to having completed two courses in the language at the 300 level, complete a 240–hour international internship and successfully complete a master's thesis.

requirements (27 credits)

IS 502

Peace, Conflict and Human Rights

3

IS 503

Challenges of Development

3

IS 505

Research Design

3

IS 507

Issues in National Security

3

IS 511

Economic Analysis for International Studies

3

IS 512

Global Political Economy

3

IS 680

Cultural Diversity/Ethnic Identities in a Globalized World

3

IS 694

Thesis Research and Writing I

3

IS 698

Thesis Research and Writing II

3

five of the following (15 credits)

IS 501

The Global Condition

3

IS 601

Democracy and the Global Challenge

3

IS 611

The Environment and Sustainable Development

3

IS 612

Development Strategies and NGOs

3

IS 620

International Law and Organization

3

IS 621

International Regulation and Corporate Social Responsibility

3

IS 631

Politics of Latin America

3

IS 633

Social Movements: A Comparative Perspective

3

IS 641

Language, Identity and Power in Latin America

3

IS 642

Cultures of Violence and Resistance in Latin America

3

IS 696

MAIS Continuing Enrollment

½–3

total credits

 

42

Course Descriptions – International Studies

IS 501 The Global Condition

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. What is "Globalization"? Does contemporary globalization represent a novel condition? Has globalization changed the equilibrium between state, society, and capital? Alternatively, has the social contract of the past century, between state and society, eroded? Does globalization reduce or exacerbate the conditions of poverty and inequality among and within states? Does globalization enhance or curtail collective political action? What type of resistance does globalization engender? In view of the promise of globalization, why are nationalism and religious inspired rebellion on the rise? (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 502 Peace, Conflict and Human Rights

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. The course analyzes theories of international and inter-group conflict and practices of resolution in the context of Human Rights, discusses how Human Rights concepts have evolved since the beginning of the 20th century and traces the evolution of concepts and the institutional development required to restore and maintain Rights and examines policy options at the international, the state, the organizational, and the local level. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 503 Challenges of Development

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course explores contested theories and practices of development in the third world. It examines the role of states and transnational institutions in development, concepts of sustainability, and alternative forms of development from below. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 505 Research Design

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course presents an introduction to research methods for graduate study in Comparative Politics and International Relations. It covers matters of research design, data collection, measurement and computer-assisted data analysis. The goals are to provide students with the skills needed to read, understand, and evaluate scholarly literature. In addition, the course should prepare students to design and undertake their own research projects to further their academic and professional growth. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 507 Issues in National Security

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course provides a review of the National Security Strategy of the United States, with a comparison to the strategies pursued by Russia and the European Union. It pays particular attention to the role of the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the role of International Law in the creation and maintenance of America’s security and freedom, especially in light of transnational threats. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 511 Economic Analysis for International Studies

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. The course studies the economy stressing the interrelationships among government, household and business sectors. It aims to familiarize students with the basic economic methods of analysis, models and their applications from an international perspective, so as to allow decision-making and work in relation with international studies. For this purpose, the key general topics in the areas of microeconomics and macroeconomics will be discussed at an introductory level. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 512 Global Political Economy

Prerequisite, admission to the international studies graduate program. International trade policy, including effects of tariffs, quotas, subsidies, exchange control, and other trade restrictions upon a nation's economy. Analysis of balance of payments. Causes and methods of correction of disequilibrium in the balance of payments. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 529 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest for International Studies. It may be repeated for credit provided the content of the course is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IS 599 Individual Study

Directed reading and/or research designed to meet specific needs of graduate students. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IS 601 Democracy and the Global Challenge

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course will explore four broad questions: 1) How democratic is democracy in “democratic” countries? 2) Does economic inequality undermine political equality? 3) How do we explain and compare various transitions from authoritarianism to some form of democratic governance? In this connection we can discuss various efforts to promote democracy today (e.g. Iraq, Afghanistan and the Middle East at large), and 4) Is global cosmopolitan democracy possible or is it a pipe-dream? (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 611 The Environment and Sustainable Development

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. Students focus on key theoretical and policy issues of global environmental sustainability from an interdisciplinary perspective. They examine nature/society interactions, links between economic development and sustainability, climate change, global environmental degradation, and unequal resource distribution. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

IS 612 Development Strategies and NGOs

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies graduate Program. The objective of this course is to enable students to investigate why non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are causing countries and groups of countries to rethink fundamental economic, social and political development strategies and policies. The course analyzes the institutional design, development and overall performance of NGOs to advance economic policy reform, social development assistance, and democracy-building programs. In this connection, the course assesses strategic plans guiding U.S. foreign policy developed by U.S. Government agencies (e.g., National Security Council, State Department, Agency for International Development) and U.S. Congress. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 620 International Law and Organization

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This is the introductory course in international law, covering the nature and sources of international law and its major developments. This course introduces students to the basic law of the international organizational system, including the United Nations and UN specialized agencies. Selected topics that may be explored include international claims (including expropriation law), human rights, norms governing the use of force, and the law of the sea and environmental issues. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 621 International Regulation and Corporate Social Responsibility

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course is an introduction to the emerging field of corporate responsibility in the international context. The discussions will focus on the concept of corporate responsibility, the development of voluntary standards to address concerns such as labor and environmental conditions, the role of international organizations, and legal implications of CSR. Case studies will be examined to evaluate the potential for CSR-based norms to fill in for inadequate, or absent, international norms on issues such as human rights. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 631 Politics of Latin America

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course explores the major political processes and themes of Latin America, such as the evolution of political systems, the role of the military in politics, revolutionary movements, processes of democratic transition and current challenges of democracy, and evolving definitions of citizenship. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 633 Social Movements: A Comparative Perspective

Prerequisite, admission to the international studies graduate program. This course examines processes of social change in contemporary nations from an interdisciplinary perspective. It examines regional, structurally embedded patterns of economic development and governance and the efforts of social movements to exercise agency to transform their societies. Integrating theory and case studies, the course explores such topics as colonial legacies, the impact of globalization, populist and neopopulist mobilization, revolutionary movements, and recent gender, ethnic, and citizenship struggles. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 641 Language, Identity and Power in Latin America

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course offers an overview of the major ethno-linguistic families of Latin America and explores the role of Language in identity formation and change. It also examines conflicts between indigenous and Spanish communities and analyzes case studies in language policy and planning. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 642 Cultures of Violence and Resistance in Latin America

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. This course examines representations of violence and different forms of resistance in the history of various Latin American countries through literature, cinema, paintings, and other artistic and cultural expressions. The objective of the course will be the understanding of the realities of Latin America as well as the critical and theoretical approaches to the subject. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 680 Cultural Diversity/Ethnic Identities in a Globalized World

Prerequisite, admission to the Master of Arts in International Studies Graduate Program. All around us we see the rising tide of ethnic, racial, and national conflicts. From the violent acts in the U.S., the Middle East, Europe, and Africa we witness that people divided are along ethnic, religious, and national identities and these divisions become the basis for intractable conflicts and violence. Is this inevitable? What are the possible causes and consequences of these conflicts? Students will learn what it means to be part of an interdependent, pluralistic world in the post cold war world or the New World Order. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

IS 694 Thesis Research and Writing I

Prerequisite, admission to the international studies graduate program. Students will develop their thesis topic by completing a relevant literature review. Building on this bibliographical work, it is expected that students will develop a comprehensive outline for the thesis. Individually supervised master's thesis research. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

IS 696 MAIS Continuing Enrollment

Prerequisite, international studies major with 45 graduate credits earned. This variable credit course is designed for students who have not completed all of their degree requirements, including thesis paper, language proficiency, and internship. If a student has not finished all of their requirements upon completing 45 credit hours and required course work, the student must enroll in this course for a minimum of ½ credit until all requirements have been met. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) ½–3 credits.

IS 698 Thesis Research and Writing II

Prerequisite, admission to the international studies graduate program. This course is structured as an advanced seminar for students with a research focus on the master's thesis. It examines core theoretical texts related to the region, empirical case studies, and strategies for structuring in-depth research projects on the student's particular area of thesis focus. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

Course Descriptions – International Internships

INTI 590A International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisites, graduate student standing, 2.5 GPA, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 10-week internship in Australia or New Zealand and to apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation, participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia or New Zealand or relative to their major. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.

INTI 590B International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisites, non-Chapman University student, graduate student standing, 2.5 GPA, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 6-week internship in Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, Chile or Spain and apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation; participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia, New Zealand, China, Hong Kong, Chile or Spain relative to their major. (Offered as needed.) 4 credits.

INTI 591A International Internships via GlobaLinks Learning Abroad

Prerequisites, Non-Chapman University student, graduate student standing, 2.5 GPA, or consent of instructor. This course provides the opportunity for students to participate in a 6-week internship in Australia, or New Zealand and apply classroom learning to a professional business setting, particularly in terms of the communication-processes involved. Students will attend a pre-departure orientation; participate in a 2-day program introduction, and are placed with appropriate sponsors in Australia or Zealand relative to their major. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3–6 credits.