College of Educational Studies

Donald N. Cardinal, Ph.D., Dean

Ky Kugler, Ed.D., ATC, Associate Dean

Kimbery White–Smith, Ed.D., Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Education

Jason Bennett, D.A., ATC, Director, Athletic Training Education Program

Susan Gabel, Ph.D., Director, Doctoral Program in Education

Dianne Ferguson, Ph.D., Director, Program Improvement and Accreditation

E. Mike Madrid, Ph.D., Education Director

Professors: Alters, Brady, Brown, Bryan, Cardinal, Colbert, P. Ferguson, Frisch, Gabel, Hass, Hunter, Kugler, Montgomery, SooHoo;

Associate Professors: Bennett, Busse, Cleary, Colón–Muñiz, Greitz–Miller, Kennedy, Maier, McNenny, White–Smith, Wilson;

Assistant Professors: Allen, Curwen, De Pedro, Dodd, Howard, Lambert, Lopez, Monzó, Nottingham, Samura;

Instructor: Kasamatsu, Padulo;

Emeriti: Fahey, Hartman, Smith, Tudor, B. Tye, K. Tye.

Ph.D. in Education

Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling

Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology/Master of Arts in Educational Psychology and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology

Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling for School Psychology Candidates

Master of Arts in Leadership Development

Master of Arts in Special Education

Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential)

Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish/English Bilingual Emphasis Option)

Master of Arts in Teaching: Secondary Education (Single Subject Credential)

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders with Speech Language Pathology Services Credential

Special Education Preliminary Credentials Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe

Special Education Credentials Level II Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe

Multiple Subject Credential

Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish English/Bilingual Emphasis

Single Subject Credential

Professional Clear Credential

Ph.D. in Education

The Chapman University College of Educational Studies Ph.D. in Education program is research intensive and intended primarily for individuals seeking a career in higher education or in other research–oriented fields. The program focuses on the formulation of new ways to think about issues and find and resolve problems in the fields of education and leadership studies in multiple settings where learning and leading are important. Four emphasis areas are available: cultural and curricular studies, disability studies, school psychology and leadership studies.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encouraged to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Online graduate application to the Chapman University Ph.D. in Education program.
  2. Supplemental application to the Chapman University Ph.D. in Education program (through online application).
  3. Official undergraduate and graduate transcripts showing evidence of a master's degree from an accredited institution of higher education.
  4. Official Graduate Record Examination results in the verbal, quantitative and analytical writing sections.
  5. Three letters of recommendation, including two from graduate–level professors who can describe the academic potential of the applicant and one from someone who can speak to the applicant's professionalism (e.g., a current employer or a current colleague and one from a graduate–level professor who can describe the academic potential of the applicant. Letters from relatives will not be considered.
  6. A personal essay (minimum of 2250 words) that will be used to assess the applicant's writing skills, career commitment, leadership potential, research interests and professional goals (uploaded through the online application). This essay should indicate the professors with whom the applicant wishes to study and the ways in which the applicant's research interests align with faculty expertise. The essay should be substantive enough for the faculty to determine the depth of the applicant's thinking and commitment to a rigorous program.
  7. A current resume showing relevant education and work experience (uploaded through the online application).

After initial screening of the application materials, selected prospective students will be invited for an in–person interview with faculty.

To be considered for admission to the school psychology emphasis, applicants are required to have an Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) degree or its equivalent and be credentialed to practice as a school psychologist. Applicants may apply for regular admission to the Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology and simultaneous conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in school psychology. If interested in this option, applicants must indicate their choice on the supplemental application for the Ed.S. in School Psychology program. Applicants must complete the regular admission process for the Ed.S. program and have their files reviewed by the director of the Ph.D. in Education program. If approved by the school psychology faculty and the director of the Ph.D. in Education program, applicants will receive full admission to the Ed.S. program and conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. in Education. To receive conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. program, applicants must achieve regular admission to the Ed.S. program. Applicants will be assigned an Ed.S. and doctoral advisor.

Demonstration of mastery

The academic progress requirements for students include a minimum GPA of 3.250 and successful completion of department and program requirements, including successful completion of qualifying exams, advancement to candidacy, a dissertation proposal and the dissertation. A dissertation sets forth a proposition in which the student advances and maintains an argument. Students will conduct research in their emphasis under the direction of a dissertation advisor and committee (see the academic policies and procedures section for guidelines). Candidates in the school psychology emphasis must also pass the ETS Praxis examination in school psychology with a minimum score of 165.

Continuous enrollment requirement

Continuous enrollment is required throughout the program. Students who have previously registered for the dissertation, but who have not completed the requirements, must be enrolled for at least one credit of EDUC 799 continually until all requirements are met. The maximum time allowed for completion of the Ph.D. is seven years.

Additional requirement for the school psychology emphasis

Students in the Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in school psychology are expected to work with faculty members on a significant research and/or writing project during their first and second years in the program. Students should meet with your advisor early on to discuss opportunities to get involved with collaborative research, scholarly presentations or writing.

In addition, the program requires a doctoral level supervised internship, which is typically completed in the third year of the program.

Students are also required to choose a professional practice emphasis. This might include developing expertise in working with a particular population (e.g., children with Autism, bilingual/bicultural youth, etc.) or developing skills in a domain of practice (e.g., providing school based mental health services, approaches to response to intervention, etc.). Students will purposefully choose activities that focus on the development of expertise in this area. This can include but is not limited to academic papers and projects, in–service opportunities, field–based practice experiences, etc. Students will document these experiences in a professional portfolio prepared at the end of their doctoral internship.

Requirements for the degree

The course of study for the Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in cultural and curricular studies, disability studies or leadership studies is 57 credits. The course of study for students in the school psychology emphasis is 48 credits. The course of study for all emphases includes the classes in four areas of study: foundations and philosophy, inquiry, dissertation and an emphasis (see below). Cultural and curricular studies and disability studies students must also take one additional course in either the inquiry or emphasis areas to reach a total of 57 credits.

cultural and curricular studies emphasis

foundations and philosophy core (6 credits)

requirements

EDUC 750

Professional Productivity in Education

3

EDUC 751

Theories Framing Inquiry

3

inquiry core (18 credits)

requirements (15 credits)

EDUC 760

Quantitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 761

Qualitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 762

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods (two three credit courses)

6

EDUC 764

Dissertation Research Planning

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 762.

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods

3

CSP 772

Data–Based Decision Making in School Psychology

3

emphasis (21 credits)

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 753

Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 779

Curriculum Theory

3

EDUC 780

Critical Pedagogies in Curriculum

3

EDUC 784

Current Controversies in Education: Cultural and Curricular Studies

3

electives (9 credits)

Three 700 level courses relevant to the cultural and curricular studies emphasis area

9

dissertation core (12 credits)

requirements

EDUC 793

Selected Topics in Dissertation Research (two one credit courses)

2

EDUC 799

Dissertation Research (two five credit courses)

10

total credits

 

57

disability studies emphasis

foundations and philosophy core (6 credits)

requirements

EDUC 750

Professional Productivity in Education

3

EDUC 751

Theories Framing Inquiry

3

inquiry core (18 credits)

requirements (15 credits)

EDUC 760

Quantitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 761

Qualitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 762

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods (two three credit courses)

6

EDUC 764

Dissertation Research Planning

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 762.

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods

3

CSP 772

Data–Based Decision Making in School Psychology

3

emphasis (21 credits)

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 770

Seminar in Disability Studies

3

EDUC 772

International Perspectives on Disability

3

EDUC 776

Current Controversies in Disability Studies

3

EDUC 778

Seminar in History of Disability Studies

3

electives (9 credits)

Three 700 level courses relevant to the disability studies emphasis area

9

dissertation core (12 credits)

requirements

EDUC 793

Selected Topics in Dissertation Research (two one credit courses)

2

EDUC 799

Dissertation Research (two five credit courses)

10

total credits

 

57

leadership studies emphasis

foundations and philosophy core (6 credits)

requirements

EDUC 750

Professional Productivity in Education

3

EDUC 751

Theories Framing Inquiry

3

inquiry core (18 credits)

requirements (15 credits)

EDUC 760

Quantitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 761

Qualitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 762

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods (including Action Research Practicum and Topics in Advanced Research for Leadership Studies) (two three credit courses)

6

EDUC 764

Dissertation Research Planning

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 762

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods

3

CSP 772

Data–Based Decision Making in School Psychology

3

emphasis (21 credits)

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 705

Moral and Ethical Leadership

3

EDUC 706

Leading Organizational Transformation: Theory and Practice

3

EDUC 707

Leading from Within: Theory and Foundations of Leadership

3

EDUC 708

Change: Politics, Policy and Advocacy

3

electives (9 credits)

Three 700 level courses relevant to the leadership studies emphasis area

9

dissertation core (12 credits)

requirements

EDUC 793

Selected Topics in Dissertation Research (two one credit courses)

2

EDUC 799

Dissertation Research (two five credit courses)

10

total credits

 

57

school psychology emphasis

foundations and philosophy core (6 credits)

requirements

EDUC 750

Professional Productivity in Education

3

EDUC 751

Theories Framing Inquiry

3

inquiry core (6 credits)

requirements

EDUC 760

Quantitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

EDUC 761

Qualitative Approaches to Inquiry

3

advanced inquiry courses (9 credits)

requirements

CSP 762

Research Methods in School Psychology

3

EDUC 762

Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods

3

CSP 772

Data Based Decision Making in School Psychology

3

emphasis (15 credits)

requirements

CSP 770

Seminar: Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 771

Advanced Seminar in Approaches to Prevention and Intervention

3

CSP 773

Systems Based Service Delivery

3

CSP 775A

Advanced Internship in School Psychology

CSP 775B

Advanced Internship in School Psychology

 

approved elective courses, (selected with the consent of the student's advisor and program director)

3

dissertation core (12 credits)

requirements

EDUC 793

Selected Topics in Dissertation Research (two one credit courses)

2

EDUC 799

Dissertation Research (two five credit courses)

10

total credits

 

48

Optional Ph.D. minor area of specialization

The Ph.D. in Education offers the option of selecting an additional 12–credit minor area of specialization. Students may choose a minor from those listed below or with the approval of the Ph.D. program advisor configure their own 12–credit minor area of specialization to complement their degree.

cultural and curricular studies minor

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 753

Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 779

Curriculum Theory

3

EDUC 780

Critical Pedagogies in Curriculum

3

EDUC 784

Current Controversies in Education: Cultural and Curricular Studies

3

disability studies minor

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 770

Seminar in Disability Studies

3

EDUC 772

International Perspectives on Disability

3

EDUC 776

Current Controversies in Disability Studies

3

EDUC 778

Seminar in History of Disability Studies

3

leadership studies minor

requirements (12 credits)

EDUC 705

Moral and Ethical Leadership

3

EDUC 706

Leading Organizational Transformation: Theory and Practice

3

EDUC 707

Leading from Within: Theory and Foundations of Leadership

3

EDUC 708

Change: Politics, Policy and Advocacy

3

school psychology minor

four of the following (12 credits)

CSP 770

Seminar: Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 771

Advanced Seminar in Approaches to Prevention and Intervention

3

CSP 772

Data–Based Decision Making in School Psychology

3

CSP 773

Systems Based Service Delivery

3

CSP 774

Seminar: Current Topics in School Psychology

3

Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling

The College of Educational Studies offers a Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling. The program prepares students to serve as counselors in public schools for grades K–12 and meets requirements for a California state credential authorizing service as a school counselor. Students with a previously earned master’s degree in counseling or a related field may earn a California state credential in school counseling without enrolling in the master of arts program. Candidates who do not have a prior earned master’s degree must concurrently enroll in the Master of Arts in Counseling. The program is designed as a full–time, two–year or four–semester program. With approval of an alternative program of study, candidates may attend part time and complete the program in three years or six semesters.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

Acceptance into the graduate programs in counseling is based on multiple criteria, including previous academic achievement, performance on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), experience working with children and in schools, knowledge of the profession of school counseling and commitment to the program's mission and goals. The program has a special interest in candidates who have experience in multilingual and multicultural settings. In keeping with the university's mission, the M.A. in School Counseling program is committed to providing a personalized education of distinction. To meet this goal, the program will enroll a limited number of students each academic year in the fall semester only. After initial screening of the application materials, selected prospective students will be invited for an in–person interview with faculty. Accurate annual deadline information is available on the program Web site. To be considered for admission to the M.A. in School Counseling program, all candidates must submit the documents listed below:

  1. Online graduate application.
  2. Supplemental application part of the online application.
  3. An autobiographical essay that will be used to assess the applicant's writing skills, commitment to the program's mission and professional goals. The essay should be approximately 750 words in length, double–spaced. Further description is provided in the online application.
  4. Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) results in the verbal, quantitative and analytical writing sections.
  5. A current resume that includes information on experiences working with children and/or families.
  6. Official transcripts from the undergraduate degree granting institution of higher education.
  7. Two letters of recommendation, which must be on Chapman University recommendation forms (found in the online application) and may include a supplemental letter. If possible, one recommendation form should be from someone who has experience with the candidate in an academic setting and knowledge of the candidate’s academic potential and a second recommendation form should be from someone who knows the candidate in a work setting, preferably one where the candidate works with children.

Program prerequisites

All candidates must pass the CBEST prior to beginning their practicum field placement.

Students entering the program are also expected to complete the following three credit prerequisite course: EDUC 401/503–Foundations of Education. Students who have a teaching credential may petition to have prior course work substituted for EDUC 401/503. Candidates without a prior earned credential must take EDUC 401/503 at Chapman University. Prerequisite course work need not be completed prior to entering the program.

Transfer policy

Up to six credits may be transferred into the program from other regionally accredited graduate institutions upon approval of a petition by the program coordinator and the dean of the college. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Demonstration of mastery

Faculty members review students each semester to determine if they demonstrate the skills, knowledge and professional attitudes necessary to be successful school counselors. Students who demonstrate these qualities will be invited to continue in the program. If faculty members have concerns about students in any of these areas, they will be asked to meet with an advisor and may be dismissed from the program. Students are required to earn a score of 150 on the Professional School Counselor exam of the Education Testing Service Praxis Examination. Students who do not attain a score of 150 after two attempts may petition the program coordinator to take an alternative comprehensive examination. To earn the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in school counseling, students must also complete an exit interview and present a professional portfolio.

Fieldwork requirement

Students in the M.A. in School Counseling program must complete a minimum of 200 hours of practicum fieldwork (CSP 515) and 600 hour of internship/final fieldwork (CSP 620 and 621). The majority of these hours must be completed in a K–12 public school setting. All hours must be under the supervision of an experienced professional with a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in school counseling. The school counseling internship credential is required for all Pupil Personnel Services Credential candidates who seek to be paid during their field experience. All students are expected to gain experiences with children and youth of a variety of ages, ability levels, cultural heritages and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling degree

CSP 500

Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 511

Introduction to the Ethical Practice of Professional School Counseling

3

CSP 512

Advanced Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 513

Group Counseling Leadership and Intervention

3

CSP 514

Cultural and Community Issues in Counseling and School Psychology

3

CSP 515

Practicum in Counseling and Intervention

(200 hours practicum)

3

CSP 516

Human Development

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 616

Leadership and Systems Change

3

CSP 617

Career Counseling and Development

3

CSP 618

Best Practices in Professional School Counseling

3

CSP 620

Supervision and Mentoring in School Counseling I

3

CSP 621

Supervision and Mentoring in School Counseling II

3

CSP 640

Consultation and Collaboration

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

48

Professional Clinical Counseling Emphasis (post degree school counseling)

Students may add the licensed professional clinical counselor emphasis after their Master of Arts in Counseling and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling degree has been conferred. This emphasis requires an additional 18 credit hours and is designed to meet the educational requirements for the California license in professional clinical counseling. See academic policy section of catalog for further information. The 18–credit emphasis is in addition to the 48–credit program for a total of 66 credits.

requirements (18 credits)

CSP 517

Mental Health in the Schools

3

CSP 519

Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals

3

CSP 602

Responding to Spousal or Partner Abuse

1

CSP 603

Human Sexuality

1

CSP 604

Aging and Long–Term Care

1

CSP 605

California Law and Professional Ethics for Professional Counselors and Psychotherapists

1

CSP 624A

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling I

1

CSP 624B

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling II

1

CSP 626

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse for the Professional Counselor

3

CSP 636

Assessment for Counselors

3

total credits

 

18

Professional Clinical Counseling Emphasis

The College of Educational Studies also offers a Master of Arts degree in Counseling with an emphasis in professional clinical counseling. These programs are designed to meet the educational requirements of the State of California Board of Behavioral Sciences as set forth in Business and Professionals Code Sections 4999.33. Recent graduates in School Counseling and School Psychology may also be eligible to pursue licensure by taking additional courses. Please contact the program coordinator for more information. For more information and application materials related to LPCC licensure, please contact the Board of Behavioral Sciences (www.bbs.ca.gov).

requirements (66 credits)

CSP 500

Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 511

Introduction to the Ethical Practice of Professional School Counseling

3

CSP 512

Advanced Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 513

Group Counseling Leadership and Intervention

3

CSP 514

Cultural and Community Issues in Counseling and School Psychology

3

CSP 515

Practicum in Counseling and Intervention (200 hours practicum)

3

CSP 516

Human Development

3

CSP 517

Mental Health in the Schools

3

CSP 519

Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

CSP 602

Responding to Spousal or Partner Abuse

1

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 603

Human Sexuality

1

CSP 604

Aging and Long–Term Care

1

CSP 605

California Law and Professional Ethnics for Professional Counselors and Psychotherapists

1

CSP 616

Leadership and Systems Change

3

CSP 617

Career Counseling and Development

3

CSP 618

Best Practices in Professional School Counseling

3

CSP 620

Supervision and Mentoring in School Counseling I

3

CSP 621

Supervision and Mentoring in School Counseling II

3

CSP 624A

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling I

1

CSP 624B

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling II

1

CSP 626

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse for the Professional Counselor

3

CSP 636

Assessment for Counselors

3

CSP 640

Consultation and Collaboration

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

66

Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology/Master of Arts in Educational Psychology and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology

The College of Educational Studies offers an Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology and a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology. Students may also earn a Master of Arts in Educational Psychology. The school psychology program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and the International Association of School Psychologists. The program prepares students to serve as psychologists in schools for ages preschool through high school. The program is designed as a full–time, three–year or six–semester program. With approval of an alternative program of study, candidates may attend part–time and complete the program in four years or eight semesters.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Students earn the Master of Arts in Educational Psychology after:

  1. Completing 54 credits of required course work for the M.A. degree.
  2. Preparing a professional portfolio.
  3. Passing an oral interview.

Students earn an Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology and a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology after:

  1. Completing 69 credits.
  2. Preparing a second professional portfolio.
  3. Passing a final oral interview.
  4. Earning a score of 165 on the ETS Praxis examination in school psychology.

Admission to the program

Acceptance into the graduate programs in school psychology is based on multiple criteria. These criteria include:

  1. Previous academic achievement: Candidates are expected to hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university.
  2. Commitment to the program mission: Candidates are required to submit an autobiographical statement that describes the life experiences that have shaped their choice of school psychology as a profession and their commitment to the program mission as described below: The mission of Chapman University is to provide a personalized education of distinction that leads to inquiring, ethical and productive lives as global citizens. The school psychology program at Chapman University builds on this mission by preparing knowledgeable, skilled and reflective school psychologists who are effective change agents for individuals, families and communities. Graduates of the school psychology program have strong interpersonal and collaborative skills and are prepared to be advocates for youth of varying abilities, cultural heritages and socioeconomic backgrounds. It is important that graduates are capable and committed to being leaders in the field of school psychology.
  3. Knowledge of the profession.
  4. Experience working with children and families: Candidates must submit a current resume outlining their experiences working with children and families. the program has a special interest in candidates who have experience in multilingual and multicultural settings.

Admissions procedures and deadlines

In keeping with the university's mission, the pupil personnel services program is committed to providing a personalized education of distinction. To meet this goal, the program will only enroll a limited number of students each academic year. After initial screening of the application materials, selected prospective students will be invited for an in–person interview with faculty. Accurate annual deadline information is available on the program Web site. To be considered for admission to the school psychology program, all candidates must submit the documents listed below:

  1. Online Graduate Application.
  2. Supplemental Application (part of the online application).
  3. An autobiographical statement of approximately 750 words in length, double–spaced. It will be reviewed by faculty to assess the applicant's suitability for the program. Further description is provided in the online application.
  4. A current resume or vita that includes information outlining experiences working with children and/or families.
  5. Official transcripts from the undergraduate degree granting institute of higher education.
  6. Two letters of recommendation. Both letters should be accompanied by Chapman University recommendation forms. At least one recommendation must be from someone who has experience with the candidate in an academic setting and knowledge of the candidate’s academic potential. A second recommendation must be from someone who knows the candidate in a work setting, preferably one where the candidate works with children. Information from the recommendations is used to help make judgments regarding a prospective candidate’s suitability and potential for professional success in the field of school psychology, including the appropriate personal characteristics.
  7. Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores.

Joint admissions into Ed.S. in School Psychology and Ph.D. in Education

Applicants may apply for regular admission to the Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology and simultaneous conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. in Education with an emphasis in school psychology. If interested in this option, applicants must indicate their choice on the supplemental application for the Ed.S. in School Psychology program. Applicants must complete the regular admission process for the Ed.S. program and have their files reviewed by the director of the Ph.D. in Education program. If approved by the school psychology faculty and the director of the Ph.D. in Education program, applicants will receive full admission to the Ed.S. program and conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. in Education. To receive conditional acceptance to the Ph.D. program, applicants must achieve regular admission to the Ed.S. program. Applicants will be assigned an Ed.S. and doctoral advisor.

After completion of 24 credits, including at least one 700–level doctoral class, students may apply for regular acceptance to the Ph.D. program by completing a new graduate application (no fee is required). Applicants will be considered for regular acceptance if they have:

  1. No outstanding incompletes.
  2. Achieved a minimum 3.750 grade point average in program course work.
  3. Earned an A– or its equivalent on the First Year Research Paper in the Ed.S. program.

Applications will be reviewed by the director of the Ph.D. in Education program and the school psychology program faculty. If students are approved by both the faculty and the director, they will receive regular acceptance into the Ph.D. program. Students who have not met the criteria may complete the Ed.S. degree, even if they do not achieve regular acceptance into the Ph.D. program.

Program prerequisites

All candidates must pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test prior to beginning their practicum field placement.

Fieldwork requirement

Students in the school psychology program must complete a minimum of 600 hours of practicum fieldwork (CSP 534, 535) and 1,200 hours of internship/final fieldwork (CSP 622, 623). The majority of these hours must be completed in a K–12 public school setting. All hours must be under the supervision of an experienced professional with a Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology.

Transfer policy

Up to six semester credits of graduate course work may be transferred into the program from other regionally accredited graduate institutions upon approval of a petition by the program coordinator and the dean or associate dean of the College of Educational Studies. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Demonstration of mastery

Faculty members review students each semester to determine if they demonstrate the skills, knowledge and professional attitudes necessary to be successful school psychologists. Students who demonstrate these qualities will be invited to continue in the program. If faculty members have concerns about students in any of these areas, they will be asked to meet with an advisor and may be dismissed from the program. Candidates can earn the M.A. in Educational Psychology after completing 54 credits, preparing a professional portfolio and passing an oral interview. Students earn the Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology and the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology after completing 69 obtaining a score of 165 on the ETS Praxis examination in school psychology, preparing a second professional portfolio and passing an oral interview. Students who do not attain a score of 165 after two attempts may petition the program coordinator to take an alternative comprehensive examination.

Requirements for the Educational Specialist Degree in School Psychology/Master of Arts in Educational Psychology

requirements (69 credits)

CSP 500

Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 510

Introduction to the Ethical Practice of School Psychology

3

CSP 512

Advanced Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 513

Group Counseling Leadership and Intervention

3

CSP 514

Cultural and Community Issues in Counseling and School Psychology

3

CSP 516

Human Development

3

CSP 517

Mental Health in the Schools

3

CSP 534

Practicum in School Psychology I

3

CSP 535

Practicum in School Psychology II

3

EDUC 544

Legal Aspects of Special Education

3

EDUC 601

Assessment and IEP Development

3

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 615

Learning and Learning Disabilities

3

CSP 616

Leadership and Systems Change

3

CSP 619

Academic Development and Intervention

3

CSP 622

Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology I

3

CSP 623

Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology II

3

CSP 637

Cognitive and Neuropsychological Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 638

Advanced Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 639

Advanced Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 640

Consultation and Collaboration

3

CSP 641

Best Practices in School Psychology

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

69

Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling for School Psychology Candidates

Graduates of the College of Educational Studies' school psychology program who also wish to receive the Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Counseling must:

  1. Complete the following course work: CSP 511, CSP 617, CSP 618, CSP 620.
  2. Prepare a professional portfolio.
  3. Pass an oral exit interview.

Professional Clinical Counseling Emphasis

The College of Educational Studies offers an Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology with an emphasis in professional clinical counseling. This program is designed to meet the educational requirements of the State of California Board of Behavioral Sciences as set forth in Business and Professionals Code Sections 4999.33. Please contact the program coordinator for more information. For more information and application materials related to LPCC licensure, please contact the Board of Behavioral Sciences (www.bbs.ca.gov).

requirements (84 credits)

CSP 500

Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 510

Introduction to the Ethical Practice of School Psychology

3

CSP 512

Advanced Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

3

CSP 513

Group Counseling Leadership and Intervention

3

CSP 514

Cultural and Community Issues in Counseling and School Psychology

3

CSP 516

Children and Youth in Developmental Context

3

CSP 517

Human Development

3

CSP 519

Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals

3

CSP 534

Practicum in School Psychology I

3

CSP 535

Practicum in School Psychology II

3

EDUC 544

Legal Aspects of Special Education

3

EDUC 601

Assessment and IEP Development

3

CSP 602

Responding to Spousal or Partner Abuse

1

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 603

Human Sexuality

1

CSP 604

Aging and Long–Term Care

1

CSP 605

California Law and Professional Ethnics for Professional Counselors and Psychotherapists

1

CSP 615

Learning and Learning Disabilities

3

CSP 616

Leadership and Systems Change

3

CSP 617

Career Counseling and Development

3

CSP 619

Academic Development and Intervention

3

CSP 622

Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology I

3

CSP 623

Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology II

3

CSP 624A

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling I

1

CSP 624B

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling II

1

CSP 626

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse for the Professional Counselor

3

CSP 637

Cognitive and Neuropsychological Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 638

Advanced Assessment for Intervention

3

CSP 639

Advanced Positive Behavioral Supports

3

CSP 640

Consultation and Collaboration

3

CSP 641

Best Practices in School Psychology

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

84

Professional Clinical Counseling Emphasis (post degree school psychology)

Students may add the licensed Professional Clinical Counselor emphasis after their Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology/Master of Arts in Educational Psychology and Pupil Personnel Services Credential in School Psychology degree has been conferred. This emphasis requires an additional 15 credit hours and is designed to meet the educational requirements for the California license in Professional Clinical Counseling (LPCC). See academic policy section of catalog for further information. 15 credit emphasis in addition to the 69–credit program for a total of 84 credits.

requirements (15 credits)

CSP 519

Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals

3

CSP 602

Responding to Spousal or Partner Abuse

1

CSP 603

Human Sexuality

1

CSP 604

Aging and Long–Term Care

1

CSP 605

California Law and Professional Ethnics for Professional Counselors and Psychotherapists

1

CSP 617

Career Counseling and Development

3

CSP 624A

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling I

1

CSP 624B

Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling II

1

CSP 626

Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse for the Professional Counselor

3

total credits

 

15

Master of Arts in Leadership Development

The mission of the Master of Arts in Leadership Development program is to develop caring, critical and creative leaders committed to the growth of their own leadership capacity as well as that of groups, organizations, institutions and the networks in which they work and live. This graduate program is designed to enhance professional practice for those who envision themselves as leader in building and sustaining healthy, equitable systems and change in the public, non–profit and private sectors. Such leaders seek to understand and to work ethically in virtual, global and local settings.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have achieved the required admission grade point average as specified in the admission section. Entrance tests are waived for students who hold a masters degree or higher with a grade point average equivalent to a 3.000 or above on a four point scale. Applicants with a grade point average between 2.500 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Transfer of course work

Six credits of graduate transfer work is the maximum allowed. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Continuous enrollment fee

Students who have previously registered for EDUC 698 but who have not completed the requirements are required to submit a continuous enrollment fee for each semester the capstone course remains outstanding.

The fee for continuous enrollment is equal to one credit of tuition charged per program and will allow students to remain in active status as well as enable them to utilize university resources for completion of the capstone requirements.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Leadership Development degree

Please consult with your advisor to determine which courses are best suited to your needs and career goals.

core courses (15 credits) must be taken at Chapman

EDUC 505

Foundations of Effective Leadership Development

3

EDUC 607

Leadership and Collaboration in Democratic Organizations

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

EDUC 655

Democracy, Leadership for Education and Social Change

3

EDUC 688

Leadership for Diversity, Equity and Community

3

elective courses (12 credits)

four of the following

EDUC 514

Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work

3

EDUC 595A

The Leader's Journey

3

EDUC 599

Individual Study (in Leadership) (repeatable)

1–3

EDUC 605

International and Global Education

3

EDUC 606

Multiple Literacies for 21st Century Education

3

CSP 616

Leadership and Systems Change (must have an organizational setting)

3

EDUC 616

Literature and Literacy

3

EDUC 626

Images of Leadership in Literature and Film

3

EDUC 629

Experimental Course

3

EDUC 634

Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourse and Social Action

3

EDUC 649

Educating with Multiple Technologies

3

EDUC 653

Current Controversies in American Education

3

EDUC 656

Seminar in Learning Theory

3

EDUC 681

Management of Personnel, Resources and Operations

3

EDUC 687

Leadership and Organizational Development

3

EDUC 699

Individual Study

1–3

capstone experiences (3 credits)

EDUC 698

Education Thesis/Project

3

total credits

 

30

Master of Arts in Special Education

The mission of the program is to develop change agents, professionals who will pursue social justice side–by–side with people with disabilities. Candidates should be prepared to believe in and be advocates for the absolute dignity of all people, including those with labels of disability.

The Preliminary Education Specialist Credential is embedded in the master’s degree.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

Admission to the program may be achieved by completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have achieved the required admission grade point average as specified in the admission section. Applicants with a grade point average between 2.500 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Transfer of course work

Up to six credits may be transferred into the program. Requests for transfer are submitted on a petition to transfer graduate degree course work. Requests must meet transfer policies specified in the academic policies and procedures section and must be approved by the program coordinator and the dean of the College of Educational Studies.

Demonstration of mastery

option one: comprehensive examination

Students must be advanced to candidacy, have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 and have completed all core courses, 41 credits, to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to take the comprehensive examination. The student must pass a written comprehensive examination that covers all of the required course work. The examination may be attempted upon completion of the program core courses. (See the academic policies and procedure section for additional guidelines.)

option two: EDUC 599 Individual Study

Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.000 to meet the minimum eligibility requirements to enroll in the Individual Study. The Individual Study focuses upon the creation, implementation, monitoring and assessing of a field–based intervention designed to improve school functioning. While research methodology may be employed, the project’s central purpose is to have the student become an agent in school change efforts. It is a means for the student to “project” himself/herself into educational reconstruction in a meaningful way. The writing style of the project must also comply with the American Psychological Association Style Manual, current edition. (See the academic policies and procedure section for additional guidelines.)

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Special Education degree

education core (39 credits)

requirements (30 credits)

EDUC 544

Legal Aspects of Special Education

3

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 561

The Profession of Teaching in Special Education

3

EDUC 570

Foundational Issues in Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 601

Assessment and IEP Development

3

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

EDUC 650

Transitions Across the Life Span

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 519

Strategies and Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

3

EDUC 560

Teaching Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 590*

Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate I

3

EDUC 591*

Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe I

3

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 592*

Student Teaching Mild/Moderate II

3

EDUC 593*

Student Teaching Moderate/Severe II

3

general education core (8 credits)

requirements

EDUC 500

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

3

EDUC 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

education electives (6 credits)

two of the following**

EDUC 599

Individual Study (requires consent of instructor)

3

EDUC 638

Advanced Strategies Mild/Moderate

3

CSP 639

Advanced Positive Behavioral Supports

3

EDUC 660

Advanced Strategies Moderate/Severe

3

total credits

 

53

* EDUC 590 and 592 or EDUC 591 and 593 will be waived for those students who hold a current credential in special education or those who are in the master's only program.

** With advisor's consent other College of Educational Studies master level courses may count as electives.

Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential)

Admission to the program

The Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education is a master's degree program where all graduate level credential courses are embedded as part of the program of study and where additional graduate classes are completed prior to demonstration of mastery for the degree. This program is designed for individuals who wish to begin their teaching career with both a teaching credential and a master's degree. The program aims to prepare candidates for positions in diverse school settings. Major themes found in both the credential and advanced core courses include teacher as constructivist, nurturer, moral educator, reflective practitioner, mediator of diversity and change agent.

Students are not eligible to transfer to the M.A. in Teaching after beginning the credential program. They must apply for the program on their admission application. M.A. in Teaching applicants must meet admissions requirements for the appropriate credential program in addition to master's level requirements.

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have a minimum admission grade point average of 3.000. Applicants with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Students with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 may be admitted in provisional standing for a maximum of one semester; provisional standing for the M.A. in Teaching specifies that students can enroll only in 400 or 500 level courses and can complete a maximum of 12 credits. Students who are below a 2.750 grade point average will be denied admission to the M.A. in Teaching.

Transfer of course work

Six credits of graduate transfer work is the maximum allowed. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Demonstration of mastery

M.A. in Teaching degree candidates must demonstrate mastery of the program elements through the successful completion of an approved culminating experience, typically a portfolio and an action research project. This demonstration of mastery occurs at the end of the program, after completing all course work and field work and includes a presentation before a panel of educators. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in all M.A. in Teaching course work prior to enrolling in EDUC 654 and 698.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential) degree

credential core (41 credits)

EDUC 500/500B

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading/Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading Bilingual (Spanish) Emphasis

3

EDUC 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

EDUC 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 540/540B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I/Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I–BCLAD

3

EDUC 540P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

1

EDUC 541/541B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II/Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II: BCLAD

3

EDUC 541P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

1

EDUC 542

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

3

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

EDUC 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 582

Student Teaching Multiple Subjects (3 + 3 or 6)

6

additional requirements for the credential core

All candidates must pass the CSET and any other required examinations. These examinations, with passing scores, must be on file in the education office by the deadline for application to student teaching. Successful completion of the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) must be verified by the credential analyst after student teaching prior to endorsement for a California credential. Six semester credits of a foreign language or equivalent experience are desired. Successful completion of the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) must be verified by the credential analyst after student teaching prior to endorsement for a California credential.

total credits for the credential

 

41

Credential credits must be completed before continuing with 600–level courses.

Master of Arts in Teaching additional course work

advanced core (12 credits)

Courses must be taken at a minimum, over two semesters. During the initial semester, following the completion of the credential program course work, students enroll in:

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

 

One additional 600–level elective course

3

the following semester, students enroll in:

EDUC 698

Education Thesis/Project

3

 

One additional 600–level elective course

3

total credits

 

53

Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish/English Bilingual Emphasis Option)

The College of Educational Studies Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education with a multiple subject bilingual emphasis program at Chapman University is designed to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and field experiences necessary to teach in California's diverse bilingual school settings. Candidates learn theory, content and methods to provide outstanding bilingual instruction that will help to improve the academic and linguistic proficiency of future generations of English learners through quality schooling. This program has an emphasis on equity in education and social justice, which comes through in all of our courses and field activities. While bilingual teacher candidates work towards their SB2042 certification, they simultaneously participate in the bilingual emphasis, which enhances their teacher preparation through a rigorous program to certify their capacity to teach in bilingual Spanish/English settings in California schools. Candidates demonstrate competence in bilingual theory, content and methodology through signature assignments aligned to the bilingual authorization standards. Candidates demonstrate language and culture competence by examination.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encouraged to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have a minimum admission grade point average of 3.000. Applicants with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Students with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 may be admitted in provisional standing for a maximum of one semester; provisional standing for the M.A. in Teaching specifies that students can enroll only in 400 or 500 level courses and can complete a maximum of 12 credits. Students who are below a 2.750 grade point average will be denied admission to the M.A. in Teaching.

Transfer of course work

Six credits of graduate transfer work is the maximum allowed. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Demonstration of mastery

M.A. in Teaching degree candidates must demonstrate mastery of the program elements through the successful completion of an approved culminating experience, typically a portfolio and an action research project. This demonstration of mastery occurs at the end of the program, after completing all course work and field work and includes a presentation before a panel of educators. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in all M.A. in Teaching course work prior to enrolling in EDUC 654 and 698.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish/English Bilingual Emphasis Option) degree

credential core (41–44 credits)

EDUC 500B

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading Bilingual (Spanish) Emphasis

3

EDUC 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

EDUC 502B

Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy and Learning for Bilingual Settings

3

EDUC 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 540B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I: BCLAD

3

EDUC 540P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

1

EDUC 541B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II: BCLAD

3

EDUC 541P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

1

EDUC 542

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

3

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

EDUC 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 582

Student Teaching Multiple Subjects (3 + 3 or 6)

3–6

additional requirements for the credential core

For the bilingual emphasis, CSET LOTE III and V Spanish language and culture sections must also be successfully completed in addition to the CSET, RICA and other assessments. These examinations, with passing scores, must be on file in the education office by the deadline for application to student teaching. Successful completion of the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) must be verified by the credential analyst after student teaching prior to endorsement for a California credential.

total credits for the credential

 

41–44

Credential credits must be completed before continuing with 600–level courses.

Master of Arts in Teaching additional course work

advanced core (12 credits)

Courses must be taken at a minimum, over two semesters. During the initial semester, following the completion of the credential program course work, students enroll in:

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

 

One additional 600–level elective course

3

the following semester, students enroll in:

EDUC 698

Education Thesis/Project

3

 

One additional 600–level elective course

3

total credits

 

53–56

Students may take a single course in a given semester, but they should keep in mind that they may not receive financial aid for taking only three credits a semester.

Master of Arts in Teaching: Secondary Education (Single Subject Credential)

In California, the appropriate credential to teach a specific subject in a departmentalized classroom at the middle school or high school level is the Single Subject Credential. This credential authorizes public school teaching in a departmentalized classroom. The Single Subject Credential is also utilized by those who wish to be subject area specialists in any K–12 setting (such as fine/performing arts, physical education and other elective areas). The Master of Arts in Teaching: Secondary Education program allows the candidate to obtain both the Single Subject Credential and the master's degree through an integrated program of course work, fieldwork and student research.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Special note: Because the M.A. in Teaching: Secondary Education program is an integrated program, students may not subsequently enroll in the M.A. in Teaching: Secondary Education program if they begin as a “credential–only” student. Additionally, students who already possess a Single Subject, Multiple Subject or Special Education Credential from California or any other U.S. state are not eligible for admission to the M.A. in Teaching: Secondary Education program.

Admission to the program

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have a minimum admission grade point average of 3.000. Applicants with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Students with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 can be admitted in provisional standing for a maximum of one semester; provisional standing for the M.A. in Teaching specifies that students can enroll only in 400 or 500 level courses and can complete a maximum of 12 credits. Students who are below a 2.750 grade point average will be denied admission to the M.A. in Teaching.

Transfer of course work

Six credits of graduate transfer work is the maximum allowed. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

State examination requirements for the Single Subject Credential

  1. Passing score on all sections of the CBEST prior to enrollment in EDUC 583.
  2. Subject matter competence can be met by passage of appropriate California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET) or completion of approved program of subject matter course work, verified by a signed waiver from an accredited California four–year college or university, prior to enrollment in EDUC 583.
  3. Passing scores on the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) applicable to the student's subject area. Typically, students must take and pass CalTPA one, two, three and four prior to completion of the credential program and issuance of the credential by the State of California.

Demonstration of mastery

M.A. in Teaching: Secondary Education degree candidates must demonstrate mastery of the program elements through the successful completion of a thesis/project, including a presentation of the thesis/project to a panel of educators that includes the student’s thesis/project advisor. This demonstration of mastery occurs at the end of the student’s last semester in the program, after completing all course work and fieldwork. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.000 in all M.A. in Teaching course work prior to the submission of the thesis/project to the thesis/project advisor for presentation and approval.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching: Secondary Education (Single Subject Credential) degree

credential core (41 credits)

EDUC 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 504

Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

3

EDUC 504P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

1

EDUC 524

Secondary Teaching and Learning I

3

EDUC 524P

PRAXIS: Secondary Teaching and Learning I

1

EDUC 525

Secondary Teaching and Learning II

3

EDUC 530

Secondary Subject Matter Methods

3

EDUC 530P

PRAXIS: Secondary Subject Matter Methods

1

EDUC 532

Content Area Literacy

3

EDUC 532P

PRAXIS: Content Area Literacy

1

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

EDUC 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 583

Student Teaching Single Subjects (3 + 3 or 6)

6

total credits for the credential

 

41

Master of Arts in Teaching additional course work

advanced core (12 credits)

Courses must be taken, at a minimum, over two semesters. During the initial semester following the completion of the credential program course work students enroll in:

EDUC 698

Education Thesis/Project

3

recommended electives (9 credits)

select courses pertinent to the thesis and/or to student's roles as secondary educator.

CSP 500

Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Intervention

3

CSP 516

Human Development

3

EDUC 519

Strategies and Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

3

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

EDUC 625

Global Perspectives: Teaching and Learning in a Changing World

3

EDUC 631

Differentiation for Academically Diverse K–12 Classrooms

3

EDUC 634

Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourse and Social Action

3

EDUC 635

Education Workshop Series

3

EDUC 648

Instructional Technology: Science and Mathematics

3

EDUC 649

Educating with Multiple Technologies

3

EDUC 654

Introduction to Educational Research

3

EDUC 655

Democracy, Leadership for Education and Social Change

3

EDUC 656

Seminar in Learning Theory

3

EDUC 659

Seminar in Curriculum Studies

3

Other 600–level electives not appearing on the list above may be taken with approval of the thesis advisor.

To maintain continuous enrollment, students not enrolled in other M.A. in Teaching advanced course work must register for one credit of EDUC 698A each fall and spring semester until the thesis/project is successfully completed and the M.A. in Teaching degree awarded (maximum six credits total for EDUC 698).

total credits

 

53

Music Education emphasis

Students pursuing the Master of Arts in Teaching: music education emphasis degree, the program requirements do not include EDUC 530P. The following substitutions must occur. Music courses will be taught by music education faculty.

MUS 533

Foundations of Music Education (replaces EDUC 503)

3

MUS 534

Managing School Programs (replaces EDUC 530)

3

MUS 698

Thesis/Project (replaces EDUC 698)

3

total credits

 

52

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Athletic trainers are health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients. The services provided by athletic trainers comprise prevention, diagnosis and intervention of emergency, acute and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations and disabilities. Athletic training is recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA) as a healthcare profession. The Master of Science in Athletic Training will begin in summer 2015 and will be a full–time, cohort–model program. As a cohort–model program, admission into the M.S. in Athletic Training program is highly competitive and limited.

The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) currently accredits Chapman University's undergraduate athletic training program and the M.S. in Athletic Training program will also seek to obtain CAATE accreditation. The M.S. in Athletic Training program has been developed to meet the rigorous educational competencies set by the National Athletic Trainers' Association and CAATE's standards for the accreditation of professional athletic training programs. Based on philosophical foundations, experiential learning and evidence–based practice, the comprehensive didactic and clinical education curriculum prepares students to challenge the Board of Certifications, Inc. (BOC) Certification Examination and for careers as certified athletic trainers in numerous practice settings. Specific program requirements, retention policy, technical standards and program handbook can all be found on the M.S. in Athletic Training Web site.

Mission

The mission of the M.S. in Athletic Training program is to provide a distinctive comprehensive health care education that focuses on the care of physically active individuals and prepares students to become ethical, scholarly certified athletic trainers who are leaders in the profession.

Goals

  1. Produce high quality, ethical and professional certified athletic trainers for employment in diverse allied health settings.
  2. Prepare students to successfully complete the Board of Certification (BOC) national certification exam.
  3. Foster the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills using an evidence–based approach.

Program outcomes

  1. Meet national accreditation standards set by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) and educational competencies as determined by the National Athletic Trainer' Association (NATA).
  2. Pass the Board of Certification (BOC) national certification exam at a minimum of 90 percent for first–time test takers.
  3. Critically appraise evidence on various patient interventions and determine the appropriateness for further use.
  4. Present capstone research project at a local, regional or national athletic training conference.
  5. Apply clinical skills during patient care and be assessed as minimally competent by either a lab instructor or preceptor or both.
  6. Value the diverse skills and attributes of a certified athletic trainer by completing a minimum of 1,200 clinical hours under the supervision of assigned preceptors.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

The M.S. in Athletic Training program has two routes for admission, with each route requiring the prospective student to complete the required course prerequisites. These routes are: 1) a student who has obtained a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university or 2) the 3 + 2 accelerated program in coordination with the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology at Chapman University.

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Application to Master of Science in Athletic Training program through the Chapman University Office of Graduate Admission.
  2. Cover letter and resume.
  3. Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended.
  4. Cumulative GPA of 3.000 or higher in last 60 undergraduate credits.
  5. Prerequisite course GPA of 3.000 or higher with no course grade below a "C" and all prerequisites taken in the previous seven years.
  6. Official GRE Scores.
  7. Hours verification form (200 hours volunteering under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer).
  8. Three letters of recommendation which describe academic and clinical abilities (one must be from a certified athletic trainer).
  9. International students only–applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree outside of the United States are required to achieve an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), minimum 550 (paper–based) or 80 (Internet–based).

Prerequisite courses

Prerequisite course syllabi are required at the time of application.

  1. Human Anatomy + Lab
  2. Human Physiology + Lab
  3. Human Nutrition
  4. Personal Health
  5. Kinesiology or Biomechanics
  6. Exercise Physiology + Lab
  7. General Psychology

Recommended courses

  1. Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
  2. General Physics
  3. General Chemistry + Lab

Additional information

  1. If a combined Anatomy/Physiology course is taken, two–semester or three–quarter courses are required.
  2. Prerequisite courses may be repeated only once; the second grade will then be used to calculate GPA.
  3. Pass/Credit grades for prerequisite courses will be converted to a "C" if letter grading options are not available.
  4. Courses which have received advanced placement credit (AP or CLEP) may fulfill prerequisite requirements. The credit hours and grade points will not be computed in the GPA calculation.
  5. Students who are offered admission are required to financially commit and enrollment deposit with the Office of Graduate Admission. Generally, the deposit must be received within two weeks of notification of admission.
  6. Students must satisfactorily complete all remaining prerequisite course requirements in accordance with the admission requirements before beginning M.S. in Athletic Training course work.
  7. Accepted students are required to meet technical standards and specific health requirements (e.g., vaccinations). Information on these standards and requirements, as well as such information as program costs, financial aid and acceptance and BOC pass rates may be found on the program's Web site.
  8. Persons who have been dismissed from another athletic training program are not eligible for consideration for admission to Chapman University.
  9. Applicants who decline or are denied admission may reapply in any subsequent year. Admission requirements are subject to change and admission in one year does not guarantee admission in any subsequent year.
  10. Persons who cannot pass an FBI/Department of Justice Background Check are not eligible for clinical education rotations and are not admissible to the program.
  11. Chapman University considers all applicants without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, gender, marital status, sexual orientation, special needs, veteran status or any other characteristic protected by applicable state or federal civil rights laws. Some information requested in the application is requested for federal or accreditation reporting and will not be used in a discriminatory manner.

Postadmission documentation

After admission into the Master of Science in Athletic Training program, the following documentation must be submitted to the athletic training program director prior to the beginning of any course work:

  1. CPR Certification; Emergency Cardiac Care or CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer (note: online CPR courses and Lay Responder Certification are not accepted).
  2. NATA Student Membership.
  3. Immunizations record (e.g., hepatitis B, TB–test within the past two months, etc.).
  4. Federal background check (can be completed upon arrival on campus).

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders with Speech Language Pathology Services Credential

The Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders program prepares students for clinical or supervisory positions in healthcare and education. It meets all the knowledge and skills required by the American Speech Language Hearing Associations (ASHA) and was granted accreditation in 2013 by the Council of Academic Accreditations of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Programs. Through skillful leadership, mentoring and individualized instruction, students develop competency as speech–language pathologists prepared to assess and treat children and adults with mild to severe communication disorders and disabilities such as stuttering, hearing loss, deafness, cleft palate, articulation disorders, voice abnormalities, stroke, progressive neurological disorders and traumatic brain injury.

Candidates learn to counsel spouses, families, siblings and educators on how to work with children and adults who use hearing aids, augmentative and alternative communication systems and other assistive technology to communicate.

The program is based on research, theory and field experience courses, 400 clinical clock hours of practicum, fieldwork and intern programs. Candidates provide assessment and treatment for persons with communication disorders from birth through adulthood during supervised off–site clinical practicum. Candidates may be placed in hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation agencies, private practice or schools for this practicum.

Graduates will be eligible for a Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) by the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association (ASHA), a California Services credential in speech/language pathology and a California state license in speech language pathology.

Admission to the program and prerequisites

To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. Application to the Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders program, using the national CSDCAS form.
  2. Undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders or the post baccalaureate equivalent (leveling courses).
  3. Official transcripts from the baccalaureate degree granting institution.
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores taken within the last five years.
  5. Three letters of recommendation, including one from an academic source, which describe the applicant's professional and academic abilities.
  6. A personal essay that will be used to assess the applicant's writing skills, career commitment and professional goals.
  7. After initial screening of the application materials, selected prospective students will be invited for an in–person interview with faculty.

Transfer of course work

With program director approval. Due to the cohort model used, transfers are not encouraged.

Demonstration of mastery

Mastery is determined by:

  1. Passing grades of "B–" or higher in all academic courses.
  2. Completion of a minimum of 400 clinical clock hours of supervised practicum across the lifespan.
  3. Completion of capstone course which includes comprehensive exams, an approved project or a thesis.
  4. Recommendation by the program director to apply for the California services credential, the state license and take the National Praxis Exam.

Requirements for the Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders degree

CSD 500

Research Methods

3

CSD 501

Articulation and Phonology

3

CSD 502

Clinical Procedures and Professional Issues

3

CSD 503

Language Disorders in Children

3

CSD 504

Fluency

3

CSD 505

Autism Spectrum Disorders and Early Childhood Assessment

3

CSD 506

Neuroanatomy

3

CSD 507

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Cognitive Aspects of Communication

3

CSD 508

Diagnostics and Assessment

3

CSD 509

School–Based Issues

3

CSD 510

Adult Language Disorders

3

CSD 511

Disorders of Swallowing/Dysphagia

3

CSD 512

Multicultural and Second Language Acquisition

3

CSD 513

Voice, Resonance and Craniofacial Disorders

3

CSD 514

Motor Speech Disorders

3

CSD 515

Advanced Audiology

3

CSD 516

Counseling

3

CSD 610

Observation

1

CSD 620

Clinical Practicum

1

CSD 630

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 640

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 650

Clinical Practicum

3

CSD 660

Clinical Practicum

1

CSD 698

Capstone (Includes thesis or project and comprehensive exam)

1

total credits

 

64

Public School Credential Programs

Chapman University has been approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) to offer the following credentials: Single Subject, Multiple Subject, Professional Clear for a Ryan Multiple Subject and Ryan Single Subject, Special Education (Education Specialist Preliminary Credential–mild/moderate and moderate/severe and level II mild/moderate and moderate/severe), speech, language pathology services and pupil personnel services with specialization in school counseling or school psychology. A Spanish/English bilingual emphasis credential is available for elementary programs only.

Title II compliance

Chapman University College of Educational Studies complies with all federal government reporting requirements pursuant to Section 207 of the Higher Education Act passed by Congress in 1998. Please see our Web site www.chapman.edu/CES for complete information.

Student Teaching: Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education

Applications for student teaching must be filed with the College of Educational Studies at the beginning of the semester/term prior to the one in which a student plans to student teach. Subject matter competency or passage of CSET must be met prior to enrolling in student teaching.

  1. Student teaching consists of one semester of full–day student teaching.
  2. Student teaching placements must be completed in public schools.
  3. Student teaching placements are made by the education director, not by students.
  4. All student teachers will be supervised by university personnel.
  5. Student teaching placements in special education classrooms are not acceptable for the Single Subject only or Multiple Subject only credentials. Summer school placements are not acceptable unless in year–round public schools.
  6. Single subject experience must be in the appropriate subject area. Neither substitute teaching, work as a teacher’s aide, nor various specialist–type teaching experiences may apply. An exception may be made in a situation in which a district hires a full–time permanent substitute assigned to a single classroom for a full school year and the substitute is evaluated by the same procedure as a contract teacher, if begun prior to admission.
  7. Special education teacher candidates, including special education interns, must meet with their advisor prior to application for student teaching.

Student appeal process

Each student has the right of academic appeal. Appeal should first be made to the coordinator of the appropriate credential program. Further appeal may be made to the dean of the College of Educational Studies and then to the appropriate committee. There is no appeal beyond the Office of the Chancellor.

Educational placement files

The Career Development Center will assist teachers and school personnel to establish a “Self–Managed Educational Placement File.” Handouts are available in the Career Development Center.

Teacher Credential Programs

A California Multiple Subject, Single Subject or Special Education (Education Specialist) teaching credential requires both proof of subject matter competence and completion of an approved credential program. Students seeking to obtain any one or more of the teaching credentials must make formal application and be admitted to teacher credential program before beginning course work.

Students admitted to credential programs are not automatically admitted to master’s degree programs, but must declare their intent when applying. Students interested in completing a master’s degree program must submit an application and meet all criteria for admission.

Requirements for admission

  1. Have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Applicants to the Single Subject Credential must also have a cumulative grade point average of 2.750 in their major field to be admitted.

    Applicants with a grade point average between 2.500 and 2.740 may be enrolled, but are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests. A passing score will fulfill both the admission and the major grade point average requirements. They may not enroll in any course work until one of the tests is passed.

  3. Possess personal qualities deemed suitable for teaching. (Note: Candidates who have been convicted or plead nolo contendere for any violation of the law, other than a minor traffic offense, may not be eligible for a California credential and must check with the program coordinator).
  4. Complete the following application procedures:
    1. Apply and be admitted to the university through the Graduate Admission Office.
    2. Submit formal application, complete an intake interview, submit all required documents and be accepted into the credential program before enrolling in any education course (other than EDUC 401 or 503, 446 or 546, 451 or 551, 470 or 570, 471 or 571).

If credential courses other than clear credential prerequisites or courses have been taken within the last seven years at another institution, a letter attesting to the candidate’s good standing must be received from that institution prior to admission to the College of Educational Studies.

General requirements

Residency

Students entering credential programs will be required to complete a minimum of 2/3 of their credential course work at Chapman. Teacher preparation course work taken at other institutions will not be automatically transferable to Chapman. Special circumstances may be petitioned. Course work older than seven years will not be accepted.

A candidate for the Clear Credential who has a Preliminary Credential from Chapman is considered to have met the residency requirement and will only need the EDUC 571 course from Chapman. The candidate could take the human development and wellness and educational technology courses elsewhere if they meet state requirements. A student who is applying for the Clear Credential from a university other than Chapman must take six credits from Chapman.

Scholarship

There are several state required examinations for California teachers, e.g., the RICA for multiple subject and special education candidates. These examinations, with passing scores, must be on file in the education office by the deadline for application to student teaching. Successful completion of the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) must also be verified by the credential analyst after student teaching prior to endorsement for a California credential. For course grading policy please refer to the academic policies and procedures section of this catalog.

Professional standards

Because the education graduate programs involve preparing people to work with the public, the school assumes the responsibility for reasonably assuring that individuals who complete the program are not only academically competent, but also capable of functioning within the established ethical and professional standards of the profession. A student in the education graduate programs must adhere to the standards of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and should understand that he/she is being trained in a program that is not only academic, but also professional in nature.

According to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) regulations, the institution has an obligation to public schools to dismiss candidates who are unsuited to be teachers. The institution reviews each candidate’s competence throughout the program in all aspects, including written and oral communication skills and attitude and informs candidates of their strengths and weaknesses, provides opportunities for corrective learning, places marginal candidates on probation, dismisses candidates who are determined to be unsuited as teachers and considers candidate appeals.

The University has both the right and obligation, to evaluate continually and, if necessary, to terminate the student’s participation in the graduate programs at any point for ethical violations and/or personal unsuitability for the profession.

Certificate of clearance and TB test verification

A certificate of clearance application and a current TB test verification must be submitted to the College of Educational Studies by the end of a student's first semester of attendance. TB test verification must have been taken within two years of submittal of documentation.

California Basic Education Skills Test (CBEST)

A passing score on the CBEST is a prerequisite for student teaching in all credential programs. Students should submit a copy of their CBEST scores directly to the education director of the College of Educational Studies. Students in the Multiple Subject and Special Education Credential programs may take the CSET Writing Skills Test in lieu of the CBEST.

Subject matter competence

All students who have not completed an approved subject matter preparation program must pass the CSET or another approved examination. The subject matter competence requirement must be fulfilled prior to student teaching, e.g., passing the CSET. Passing scores or appropriate documentation indicating fulfillment of the subject matter competence requirement must be on file in the College of Educational Studies by the application deadline for student teaching.

U. S. Constitution competency

All credential candidates must complete an approved course with a grade of "C" or better covering the U. S. Constitution or pass a college level exam in this area (POSC 110 meets this requirement).

CPR requirements

All SB 2042 candidates must provide verification of CPR training for infant, child and adult prior to applying for the Preliminary Credential. All Ryan candidates must provide this verification prior to applying for the professional clear.

Special Education Preliminary Credentials Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe

Chapman University offers Special Education (Education Specialist) Preliminary Credentials in two disability areas: mild/moderate and moderate/severe.

Requirements

  1. Passing score on the CBEST examination or passing score on the CSET writing skills test.
  2. Subject matter preparation requirement: subject matter requirements in special education are met by completing the subject matter requirements from either single subject or multiple subject programs. If the candidate already holds another basic teaching credential (i.e., multiple subject or single subject), no additional subject matter requirement is necessary.
  3. Passing score on the RICA exam prior to application for credential (exam should be taken after EDUC 400 or 500).
  4. All candidates completing any Special Education Preliminary Credential must clear their credential within five years of obtaining their first special education teaching position following the completion of the Preliminary Credential.
  5. All students entering any preliminary education specialist program must attend an orientation.

Special Education Preliminary Credentials Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe requirements

requirements (35 credits)

EDUC 400 or 500

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

3

EDUC 400P or 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 402 or 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 402P or 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

EDUC 451 or 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 470 or 570

Foundational Issues in Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 471 or 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 544

Legal Aspects of Special Education

3

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 561

The Profession of Teaching in Special Education

3

EDUC 601

Assessment and IEP Development

3

EDUC 602

Positive Behavioral Supports

3

EDUC 650

Transitions Across the Life Span

3

select one of the following emphases (9 credits)

mild/moderate emphasis

EDUC 519

Strategies and Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

3

EDUC 590

Student Teaching Mild/Moderate I

3

EDUC 592

Student Teaching Mild/Moderate II

3

moderate/severe emphasis

EDUC 560

Teaching Students With Moderate/Severe Disabilities

3

EDUC 591

Student Teaching Moderate/Severe I

3

EDUC 593

Student Teaching Moderate/Severe II

3

total credits

 

44

Special Education Credentials Level II Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe

Induction into the Special Education Credentials Level II program must occur after the completion of the Level I Education Specialist Credential. The Level II program consists of 15 credits (five courses) and the completion of the candidate’s personal goals and objectives outlined in the Professional Induction Plan (IPP). To complete the Level II program, the candidate must teach two full–time years in the disability area for which they are receiving the credential (see your advisor for specific details); the time begins after the person receives their Level I Credential. The entire Level II program must be completed within five years.

Special Education Credentials Level II Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe requirements (15 credits)

requirements (12 credits)

CSP 639

Advanced Positive Behavioral Supports

3

EDUC 650

Transitions Across the Life Span

3

EDUC 690

Professional Induction Planning and Assessment

6

one of the following (3 credits)

EDUC 638

Advanced Strategies Mild/Moderate

3

EDUC 660

Advanced Strategies Moderate/Severe

3

total credits

 

15

In addition, to clear their Preliminary Credential, candidates must complete the approved courses in health education for teachers, mainstreaming and classroom application of computers. These courses must not be more than seven years old at the time of their application for the Level II Credential.

Multiple Subject Credential

The Multiple Subject Credential authorizes the holder to teach all subjects in a self–contained classroom, K–12, as well as in preschool and adult education. It is the credential sought by those who wish to teach elementary education (K–6).

Multiple Subject Credential requirements

  1. Passing score on the CBEST.
  2. Passage of CSET prior to Student Teaching (EDUC 482 or 582).
  3. If a candidate has not passed CBEST or CSET upon application, then proof of registration must be provided.
  4. Passing score on the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA) exam prior to application for a credential (not to be taken before completion of EDUC 400 or 500).

NOTE: Six semester credits of a foreign language or equivalent are highly recommended.

course requirements

EDUC 400 or 500

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

3

EDUC 400P or 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 401 or 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 402 or 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 402P or 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

EDUC 440 or 540

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

3

EDUC 440P or 540P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

1

EDUC 441 or 541

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

3

EDUC 441P or 541P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

1

EDUC 443 or 542

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

3

EDUC 446 or 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 451 or 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 470 or 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 471 or 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 482 or 582

Student Teaching Multiple Subjects

6

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

total credits

 

41

Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish/English/Bilingual Emphasis Option)

The College of Educational Studies Multiple Subject Credential with bilingual emphasis program at Chapman University is designed to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills and field experiences necessary to teach in California's diverse bilingual school settings. Candidates learn theory, content and methods to provide outstanding bilingual instruction that will help to improve the academic and linguistic proficiency of future generations of English learners through quality schooling. This program has an emphasis on equity in education and social justice, which comes through in all of our courses and field activities. While bilingual teacher candidates work towards their SB2042 certification, they simultaneously participate in the bilingual emphasis, which enhances their teacher preparation through a rigorous program to certify their capacity to teach in bilingual Spanish/English settings in California schools. Candidates demonstrate competence in bilingual theory, content and methodology through signature assignments aligned to the bilingual authorization standards. Candidates demonstrate language and culture competence by examination.

In keeping with the College of Educational Studies commitment to developing global citizenship, students are encourage to consider participating in at least one international learning experience during the course of their program.

Admission to the program may be achieved by the completion of the following requirements:

  1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.
  2. Have a minimum admission grade point average of 3.000. Applicants with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 are required to submit passing scores from one of the following standard admission tests:

Students with an admission grade point average between 2.750 and 2.990 may be admitted in provisional standing for a maximum of one semester; provisional standing for the M.A. in Teaching specifies that students can enroll only in 400 or 500 level courses and can complete a maximum of 12 credits. Students who are below a 2.750 grade point average will be denied admission to the M.A. in Teaching.

Transfer of course work

Six credits of graduate transfer work is the maximum allowed. (See the academic policies and procedures section for transfer guidelines.)

Requirements for the Elementary Education (Multiple Subject Credential with Spanish/English/Bilingual Emphasis Option)

credential core (41–44 credits)

EDUC 500B

Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading/Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading Bilingual (Spanish) Emphasis

3

EDUC 500P

PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

1

EDUC 501

Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

3

EDUC 501P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

1

EDUC 502B

Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy, Learning for Bilingual Settings

3

EDUC 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 540B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I–BCLAD

3

EDUC 540P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

1

EDUC 541B

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II/BCLAD

3

EDUC 541P

PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

1

EDUC 542

Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

3

EDUC 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

EDUC 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 582

Student Teaching Multiple Subjects (3 + 3 or 6)

3–6

additional requirements for the credential core

For the bilingual emphasis, CSET LOTE III and V Spanish language and culture sections must also be successfully completed in addition to the CSET, RICA and other assessments. These examinations, with passing scores, must be on file in the education office by the deadline for application to student teaching. Successful completion of the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) must be verified by the credential analyst after student teaching prior to endorsement for a California Credential.

total credits for the credential

 

41–44

Students may take a single course in a given semester, but they should keep in mind that they may not receive financial aid for taking only three credits a semester.

Single Subject Credential

In California, the appropriate credential to teach a specific subject in a departmentalized classroom at the middle school or high school level is the Single Subject Credential. This credential authorizes public school teaching in a departmentalized classroom. The Single Subject Credential is also utilized by those who wish to be subject area specialists in any K–12 setting (such as fine/performing arts, physical education and other elective areas).

Single Subject Credential state examination requirements

  1. Passing score on all sections of the CBEST prior to enrollment in EDUC 483 or 583.
  2. Subject matter competence can be met by passage of appropriate California Subject Examinations for Teachers (CSET) or completion of approved program of subject matter course work, verified by a signed waiver from an accredited California four–year college or university, prior to enrollment in EDUC 483 or 583.
  3. Passing scores on the California Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPAs) applicable to the student's subject area. Typically, students must take and pass CalTPA one, two, three and four prior to completion of the credential program and issuance of the credential by the state of California.

requirements (41 credits)

EDUC 401 or 503

Foundations of Education

3

EDUC 404 or 504

Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

3

EDUC 404P or 504P

PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

1

EDUC 424 or 524

Secondary Teaching and Learning I

3

EDUC 424P or 524P

PRAXIS: Secondary Teaching and Learning I

1

EDUC 425 or 525

Secondary Teaching and Learning II

3

EDUC 430 or 530

Secondary Subject Matter Methods

3

EDUC 430P or 530P

PRAXIS: Secondary Subject Matter Methods

1

EDUC 432 or 532

Content Area Literacy

3

EDUC 432P or 532P

PRAXIS: Content Area Literacy

1

EDUC 446 or 546

Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

3

EDUC 451 or 551

Educational Applications of Technology

3

EDUC 470 or 570

Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

3

EDUC 471 or 571

Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

3

EDUC 483 or 583

Student Teaching Single Subjects

(taken with EDUC 425 or 525)

6

EDUC 550

Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

1

total credits (excluding prerequisites)

 

41

Professional Clear Credential

For holders of a Ryan credential, in order to obtain a Professional Clear Credential, the Commission on Teacher Credentialing requires completion of a fifth year of study beyond the bachelor’s degree. The fifth year must consist of at least 30 semester credits and include approved courses in health education (covering drugs, alcohol, tobacco and nutrition (EDUC 546), mainstreaming (EDUC 571), classroom applications of computers (EDUC 551) and valid certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which covers adults, children and infants.

  1. A fifth year of study will consist of the following types of course work:
    1. Courses in a teacher preparation program taken after conferral of the bachelor’s degree.
    2. Courses in a master’s degree program.
    3. Courses leading to advanced credentials, such as school administration.
    4. Courses used for additional subject matter preparation e.g., programs, supplemental authorizations. A Chapman Preliminary Credential meets the residence requirement.
  2. To receive Chapman University’s recommendation for the Professional Clear Credential, courses must meet the following guidelines:
    1. Be taken after the bachelor’s degree or have been given post–baccalaureate status from the institution where it was taken (must be indicated on an official transcript from that institution).
    2. Be upper–division or graduate level except for a maximum of six lower–division credits. Lower–division credits may only be composed of the health education course and/or courses used to meet the requirements for a supplemental authorization.
    3. One of the following grade requirements must be met:
      1. A grade of "B–" or higher.
      2. Pass (based on pass/no pass scale).
      3. Credit (based on credit/no credit scale).
    4. A candidate must have completed a minimum of nine semester credits at Chapman University. A Chapman Preliminary Credential meets the residency requirement.
    5. At the time of application for the Professional Clear Credential, the approved courses in health education, mainstreaming and classroom application of computers must not be more than seven years old.
    6. Courses must be appropriate to the candidate’s credential area or educational goals.
    7. Students who were enrolled at Chapman prior to January 1, 1998 and completed a CCAC approved mainstreaming course prior to that date may use that course toward the completion of the Professional Clear Credential only. The course will not be accepted toward the M.A. in Special Education or any Special Education Credential at Chapman. Students are required to sign a statement indicating acknowledgment of this restriction. Students who first enrolled in course work after January 1, 1998 are required to complete EDUC 571 for credential recommendation.
    8. Some “extension” credit may be accepted. Such course work will not be accepted for a master’s degree.

Students who obtained a Preliminary Credential under 2042 legislation, if employed in a California public school district, must obtain the Professional Clear Credential through their district's BTSA/induction program.

Students not employed in a California public school district may obtain a Professional Clear Credential through a program offered at a county office of education or a university that operates such a program.

Course Descriptions – Athletic Training

AT 501 Seminar in Evidence-Based Practice I: Foundations of EBP

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. This foundational course is designed to introduce EBP concepts, how their application is essential to sound clinical decision-making, and knowledge/skills necessary for entry-level athletic trainers to use a systematic approach to answer clinically relevant questions. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

AT 510 Emergency Management and Standards of Care in Athletic Training

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Performance and evaluation of acute care skills for a patient with an immediate emergent situation in athletic training. Evaluates accreditation competencies and position statements on standards of care for patients. Skills include, but not limited to, management of: cervical spine, heat-illness, airway/cardiac, and blood-borne pathogens. (Offered summer.) 2 credits.

AT 515 Introduction to Patient Care and Clinical Skills

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. Introduction to clinical skills utilized to provide successful patient-care in healthcare settings. Practical application of documentation, taping and wrapping for extremities, stretching, therapeutic modalities, equipment fitting, basic care for acute injuries, and basic concussion evaluation methods. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

AT 550 Athletic Training Clinical Experience I

Prerequisite, MS in athletic training major. An introduction to clinical education experiences in the athletic training program. Includes basic application of skills including diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and documentation of patient care in various settings. Students will also develop professional behaviors and communication through collaboration with athletic trainers and other healthcare professionals. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

Course Descriptions – Communication Sciences and Disorders

CSD 500 Research Methods

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Research methods, design, analysis within evidence-based-practice. Evaluate research studies in communication sciences and disorders; apply results of research-based intervention in practice of speech-language pathology. Understand roles as evaluators and consumers of research, learn to critically read literature, apply findings, and identify own research to advance science. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 501 Articulation and Phonology

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth study of normal development of articulation/phonology, the nature and causes of abnormal articulation/phonology, and the assessment and treatment of these processes. Student develops skills in phonetic transcription of errors, administration and evaluation of articulation test results, and planning treatment procedures. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 502 Clinical Procedures and Professional Issues

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Develop an understanding of the clinical process, clinical terminology, reviewing files, reviewing general disorder areas, understanding communication abilities of clients, positive and negative clinician traits, writing behavioral objectives, teaching and treatment techniques, data collection and analysis, and preparing for first clinical experience. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 503 Language Disorders in Children

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Disorders of language in children ages 3-21; impact on academic performance, high and low incidence disorders; prevention, screening, assessment, identification, and treatment. Principles/techniques of assessment, intervention focus on the periods of emergent language, language for learning, advanced adolescent language, integrated with students’ clinical practicum. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 504 Fluency

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies detailed information regarding stuttering and fluency disorders in children and adults. Theories of stuttering will be reviewed, culminating in demonstrations of assessment and treatment of disfluency and stuttering, cluttering behaviors that interfere with communication in school or work behaviors and cause emotional stress. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 505 Autism Spectrum Disorders and Early Childhood Assessment

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis, etiologies, and characteristics across the lifespan. Topics will include current, controversial, traditional treatments: applied behavior analysis, theory of mind, weak central coherence, "Extreme Male" theory, biomedical issues, special diets, chelation, and Pivotal Response Theory. Also includes early childhood assessment critical to diagnosis and intervention. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 506 Neuroanatomy

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course provides detailed information regarding the peripheral and central nervous systems as they relate to normal speech and voice production, language, cognition and swallowing. Students will gain an increased awareness of neuropathologies that contribute to neurogenic communication disorders and dysphagia. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 507 Augumentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Cognitive Aspects of Communication

Prerequisite, CSD major. Course studies include augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), related assistive technology used to aid individuals with complex communication needs (e.g., severe physical impairments, sensory impairments, severe communication disorders, etc.); impact of cognitive, educational, physical, psychosocial, and linguistic aspects of human behavior on AAC use, assessment, intervention, research issues. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 508 Diagnostics and Assessment

Prerequisites, CSD major, satisfactory completion of clinical observation and enrolled in the first clinical placement. Art and science of diagnostic assessment; knowledge/skills to assess communication disorders across the lifespan; interpret assessment findings, communicate results. Test development/measurement validity, reliability, standardized scores. Active test administration; combine case history assessment information to develop client profiles leading to diagnosis, recommendation, treatment goals. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 509 School-Based Issues

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course studies issues experienced in the educational system where many speech language pathologists work, including understanding/appreciation of varying processes/procedures, Legislative foundations, referral/assessment process, Student Study Team, IEP process, RTI, service delivery options, state curriculum standards, specialized services, review of SLP role in public school. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 510 Adult Language Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD major. Detailed information regarding acquired speech, language and cognitive-communicative disorders, and the neurological conditions that cause them. Students will become familiar with procedures for assessment, treatment, and management of patients in locations ranging from the intensive care unit to outpatient services. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 511 Disorders of Swallowing/Dysphagia

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the normal swallow in children and adults. Neurological and oncologic disorders which affects the swallowing process. Evaluation of the patient with dysphagia includes clinical and instrumental analysis. Treatment plans based on history and evaluation results will be designed and examined. Historical and current research and its effects upon the assessment and management of swallowing disorders. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 512 Multicultural and Second Language Acquisition

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. Current theories on language acquisition and practical application pertaining to culturally and linguistically diverse persons with communication disabilities. Develop cultural competence in assessment, intervention, and family/community interactions; support successful school and healthcare experiences across lifespan; will address use of interpreters and community resources for language difference, disorder, and disability. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 513 Voice, Resonance, and Craniofacial Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD majors only. In-depth-study of etiology, interdisciplinary assessment, remediation of communicative impairments in children, and adults with craniofacial anomalies. Etiological factors and methodology for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of functional and organic disorders of voice across the lifespan and in diverse populations. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 514 Motor Speech Disorders

Prerequisite, CSD 506. In-depth study of motor speech disorders in children/adults resulting from developmental, acquired and progressive conditions caused by damage to the central and peripheral nervous system. Neurological bases of speech production; detailed information regarding general speech characteristics found in apraxia of speech and dysarthrias. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 515 Advanced Audiology

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course is designed for the speech-language pathologist to understand the clinical procedures in audiology. The course will be divided into three major sections: 1) anatomy, physiology, and disorders of the ear, 2) amplification and prosthetics in audiology and audiologic rehabilitation, 3) special issues in audiology such as Auditory Processing Disorders (APD), counseling issues, and educational audiology. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 516 Counseling

Prerequisite, CSD major. This course will introduce students to the counseling skills needed by speech-language pathologists in their daily interactions with clients/patients and their families. A broad overview of counseling theories and techniques will be provided, with an emphasis throughout the course on "positive psychology" and a wellness perspective. Students will understand the emotional needs of individuals with communication disorders and their families and how communication disorders affect the family system. Counseling needs of individuals with specific disorders will be discussed, including those with fluency disorders, autism spectrum disorders, hearing loss, acquired/adult language and cognitive disorders, and congenital disorders. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 610 Observation

Prerequisite, CSD major. Students will acquire 25 hours of observation required by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) in assessment and intervention with culturally/linguistically diverse populations across the life-span. Professional and ethical issues in settings include hospitals, schools, clinics, skilled-nursing facilities, homes. Fee: $400. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

CSD 620 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, CSD major. Students will acquire 45 hours of clinical experience in both assessment and intervention in the areas of phonology, language disorders of children, fluency, and autism spectrum disorders. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations across the life-span in a variety of settings. (Offered spring semester.) 1 credit.

CSD 630 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, CSD majors only. Students will acquire 45 hours of clinical experience in patient counseling, diagnostics, assessment, intervention for individuals with cognitive impairment and those who use, or are candidates for AAC devices. Clinical contact with culturally/linguistically diverse populations across the life-span in a variety of settings. (Offered summer.) 3 credits.

CSD 640 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, CSD major. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in a school-based speech and language services setting. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 650 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, 640, CSD majors only. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in health-care/medical setting. Clinical contact will include specialty areas of dysphagia and motor speech disorders with linguistically and culturally diverse populations. CSD 650 may include a paid clinical internship in a health-care setting. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSD 660 Clinical Practicum

Prerequisites, CSD 610, 620, 630, 640, 650, CSD major only, consent of instructor. Students will acquire 105 hours of clinical experience in paid externship in health-care or school setting. Clinical contact will include linguistically and culturally diverse populations. Students in CSD 660 may focus on a specialty area: voice, cranio-facial disorders, cognitive disabilities. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

CSD 698 Capstone

Prerequisites, CSD major, consent of instructor, all coursework in CSD, plus a completed program evaluation for MS degree. Students write a thesis or project, take the comprehensive exam and prepare for national praxis exam in speech language pathology. Successful completion of this course results in program director recommendation for speech language pathology preliminary SLP service credential, clinical fellowship year (CF), required professional experience (RPE), national praxis examination. Fee for comprehensive exam. (Offered summer.) 1 credit.

Course Descriptions – Counseling and School Psychology

CSP 500 Introduction to Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

Prerequisite, acceptance into the graduate program in professional school counseling, or school psychology. This course introduces students to theories of counseling and mental health interventions. The emphasis will be on developing skills in a solution focused approach to counseling and interviewing. Major units of study include theories of change, resiliency, legal and ethical issues in counseling, and characteristics of a “strength-based” or “solution-focused” approach to counseling. Students will have the opportunity to learn and practice the communication skills necessary for establishing rapport, collaboratively creating appropriate goals, and evaluating progress in counseling. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 510 Introduction to the Ethical Practice of School Psychology

Prerequisite, acceptance into the graduate program in school psychology. This is the introductory course to the specialist program in school psychology at Chapman University. It introduces students to the roles school psychologists play in public schools, ethical and legal guidelines that shape the profession, and emergent practices. Students are required to spend a minimum of 10 hours of fieldwork interviewing and observing an experienced school psychologist. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 511 Introduction to the Ethical Practice of Professional School Counseling

Prerequisite, acceptance into the graduate program in school counseling. This is the introductory course to the graduate program in school counseling at Chapman University. It introduces students to the comprehensive developmental professional school counseling model advocated by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the roles counselors play in the public schools, the ethical and legal guidelines that shape the profession, and emergent practices in individual and group assessment, academic advisement, career counseling, crisis intervention, personal/social counseling, consultation, and systems change. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 512 Advanced Counseling and Mental Health Interventions

Prerequisites, CSP 500, and CSP 510, or 511. Students will review the concepts and skills introduced in CSP 500 and learn how to integrate strategies and techniques from art and play therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy into a solution focused brief therapy model. Students will also learn how to respond to crises, including loss and threats to harm self and others. In addition, students will learn how to assist children and families to access community resources when needed. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 513 Group Counseling Leadership and Intervention

Prerequisites, CSP 500, and 510, or 511, or concurrent enrollment. This course emphasizes theories, methods and an experiential understanding of group counseling, leadership, and intervention with children and parents. Emphasis is placed on using these skills with children and youth of various age levels and in multicultural settings. Student will be expected to gain sufficient field experience to design, implement, and evaluate a group counseling intervention with children, youth, or parents in a school or agency setting. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 514 Cultural and Community Issues in Counseling and School Psychology

Prerequisite, acceptance into the graduate program in counseling, or school psychology. This course requires a minimum of 15 hours of field experience in a community setting. Readings, written assignments, and in-class activities focus on the unique challenges diversity brings to the provision of counseling and psychological services to children, youths, and parents. Students will learn the history, culture, and expectations of various ethnic and cultural groups and develop the cross-cultural communication skills necessary to work effectively with families of varying cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Students will also explore how issues such as immigration, poverty, and racism affect pupil development, counseling practices, and the development of effective interventions. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 514A Counseling and Intervention in Multicultural Settings: Travel Course

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course involves travel to different countries and focuses upon the unique challenges diversity brings to the provision of counseling and psychological services. Students will learn the history, culture, and expectations of the host country and develop the cross-cultural communication skills necessary to effectively work with families of varying cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Students will also explore how issues such as immigration, poverty, sexism, and racism affect counseling practices and the development of effective interventions. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 515 Practicum in Counseling and Intervention

Prerequisites, CSP 500, 511, certificate of clearance. This course provides opportunities for counseling students to practice intervention skills under close supervision. Students will apply the knowledge and techniques learned in previous course work to the resolution of individual, group, and systems level problems. A minimum of 200 hours of fieldwork in an approved public school or agency setting is required. In addition to the required field-based experiences, students meet with a university instructor for a minimum of twenty-four hours of group seminar discussion and supervision. May be repeated for credit. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 516 Human Development

Prerequisite, counseling, or school psychology graduate program. This course requires a minimum of 15 hours fieldwork observing individuals in various settings. Students examine the processes of typical and atypical development in the context of family, school, and culture. Major units of study include developmental theory as applied to children and adults, the characteristics and effective interventions for common psychosocial problems of school aged youth, and assessment of children and youth and adults via observation and interview. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 517 Mental Health in the Schools

This course will cover a variety of topics related to mental health in the school setting. Students will learn about common disorders of childhood, including those covered in the DSM-IV. Emphasis will be placed on identification, prevention, and intervention. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 519 Psychopharmacology for Mental Health Professionals

Prerequisite, acceptance to the graduate program in school counseling, or school psychology, or emphasis in professional clinical counseling, or consent of instructor. This course meets one of the requirements for the emphasis in professional clinical counseling. The course is an overview of psychopharmacology, including the biological bases of behavior, neurophysiology, and an understanding of brain functions as related to behavior and learning. Emphases are placed on the biological principles of psychopharmacology, basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed medications, and on the professional and ethical issues on the use of medications for the treatment of mental health disorders. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 534 Practicum in School Psychology I

Prerequisites, CSP 500, 510, 512, 516, 637, EDUC 601. CSP 534 and 535 require a total of 600 hours of practica fieldwork. 450 hours must be in a school setting. 150 hours may be done in an approved community agency. Students also meet with a university instructor for lecture, seminar discussions, and group supervision. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 535 Practicum in School Psychology II

Prerequisite, CSP 534. CSP 535 requires completion of 600 hours of practica fieldwork. 450 hours must be in a school setting. 150 hours may be done in an approved community agency. Students also meet with a university instructor for lecture, seminar discussions, and group supervision. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 602 Responding to Spousal or Partner Abuse

This course covers spousal and partner abuse and will review assessment, detection and intervention strategies to prevent or respond to emotional harm, assault, rape and sexual assault and homicide. Cultural factors, at-risk characteristics, same-gender abuse dynamics, safety planning and community resources are also included. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 603 Human Sexuality

The study of human sexuality reviews social activities, behaviors, series of actions, and societal topics. This course offers a broad examination of human sexuality from the perspective of the practitioner, including the characteristics and method of assessment for people living with HIV/AIDS. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 604 Aging and Long–Term Care

This course examines the biological, social, and psychological aspects of aging including changes in health, relationships and issues related to medical, financial, housing and long–term care. Also included is the growing problem of elder abuse and neglect, including warning signs and assessment for abusive situations. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 605 California Law and Professional Ethics for Professional Counselors and Psychotherapists

This course examines professional, legal, and ethical issues for counselors, including scope of practice for LPCC, counselor-client privilege, confidentiality, duty to warn, and California laws and regulations governing the practice of counseling in clinical settings. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 615 Learning and Learning Disabilities

Prerequisites, CSP 637, 638. Corequisite, CSP 534, or 535, or 622, or 623. This course will further students’ understanding of the learning processes that occur in all children, including those with learning disabilities. Students will review methods and models for the identification of learning disabilities, and conduct an assessment focused on identification of a learning disability. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 616 Leadership and Systems Change

Corequisite, CSP 620, or 621, or 622, or 623. This course will focus on the knowledge and leadership skills necessary to become effective change agents. Students will learn data-based decision making as it is applied to designing, implementing, coordinating, and evaluating interventions to enhance systems within schools. Topics include: principles of collaboration and team work, facilitating teams of pupil, teacher, administrators, parents, and community members to meet pupil needs, program development and evaluation, and enhancing organizational climate and staff morale though consultation and in-service education. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 617 Career Counseling and Development

This course focuses upon the process of career choice, including the skills of assessment, decision-making, goal setting, vocational assessment, career information, and career education programs. Students will learn school-to-career systems appropriate for all students, including those with disabilities. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 618 Best Practices in Professional School Counseling

Corequisite, CSP 620, or 621, or permission of the program coordinator. Students will review the knowledge, skills, and standards of the graduate program in professional school counseling in final preparation for their employment as professional counselors. Students will prepare for the Comprehensive Examination, complete their program portfolios, develop a capstone project, and create an in-service education program suitable for presentation to school personnel or community members as part of this course. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 619 Academic Development and Intervention

Prerequisite, CSP 637 with a grade of B or better. Corequisites, CSP 534, 535. With consent of instructor CSP 622, 623 may satisfy corequisites. This course will further students’ understanding of the various ways to assess academic skills in students, including curriculum-based approaches and response to intervention. Students will also learn to select, implement, and monitor evidence-based interventions for all academic areas. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 620/621 Supervision and Mentoring in School Counseling I/II

Prerequisites, CSP 515, approval of internship site by program coordinator, or advisor. Supervised field experience in professional school counseling, which leads to competency in direct and indirect services to pupils in the areas of academic, career/vocational, and personal and social development. In addition to the required field experience, student interns participate in a minimum of fifteen hours of on-campus group supervision and seminar each semester. By the completion of CSP 620, and 621, students are expected to gain a total of 600 hours of experience. These hours may be done part-time over the course of an academic year or full time over a period of one semester. Students must complete a minimum of two hundred (200) clock hours at two of three school levels (elementary, middle, and high school). At least 400 clock hours must be completed and supervised in public school settings with K-12 pupils. A maximum of 200 of the 600 clock hours may be completed in an approved alternative setting outside public schools. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3, 3 credits.

CSP 622 Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology I

Prerequisites, successful completion of CSP 534, 535, and approval of fieldwork site by program coordinator, or advisor. Supervised fieldwork in school psychology. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,200 hours of fieldwork. A minimum of 800 of these hours must be completed in an approved K-12 public school setting. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 clock hours across three of four settings, including (a) preschool, (b) elementary, (c) middle school or junior high, and (d) high school. These hours may be done on a full-time basis over the course of one academic year, or on a part time basis over no more than two consecutive academic years. In addition to the required field experience, students are expected to participate in an on-campus seminar and group supervision each semester. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 623 Supervision and Mentoring in School Psychology II

Prerequisites, successful completion of CSP 534, 535, and approval of fieldwork site by program coordinator, or advisor. Supervised fieldwork in school psychology. Students are required to complete a minimum of 1,200 hours of fieldwork. A minimum of 800 of these hours must be completed in an approved K-12 public school setting. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 clock hours across three of four settings, including (a) preschool, (b) elementary, (c) middle school or junior high, and (d) high school. These hours may be done on a full-time basis over the course of one academic year, or on a part time basis over no more than two consecutive academic years. In addition to the required field experience, students are expected to participate in an on-campus seminar and group supervision each semester. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 624A Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling I

Recommended corequisite, CSP 620, or 621, or 622, or 623. Fieldwork required for licensure as an LPCC. A minimum of 280 hours of supervised l counseling in a clinical setting that is required by the completion of CSP 624A and 624B. Approved site supervisors must have two years’ experience in mental health counseling. Students participate in an on-campus group supervision. All fieldwork sites and supervisors must be approved. P/NP. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 624B Supervision and Mentoring in Professional Clinical Counseling II

Prerequisite, emphasis in professional clinical counseling. Fieldwork required for licensure as an LPCC. A minimum of 140 hours of supervised counseling in a clinical setting that is required by the completion of CSP 624B. Approved site supervisors must have two years’ experience in mental health counseling. Students participate in an on-campus group supervision. All fieldwork sites and supervisors must be approved. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1 credit.

CSP 626 Assessment and Treatment of Substance Abuse for the Professional Counselor

Theoretical and clinical approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholism, chemical dependency, and co-occurring disorders. Students review current research and program design with the goal of increasing professional awareness and skills in treating the chemical dependent family or individual. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 636 Assessment for Counselors

This course teaches the clinical application of assessment instruments and processes designed specifically for counseling practice. Topics include the basic concepts of standardized and non-standardized assessment strategies, including statistical concepts, social and cultural factors related to assessment, and ethical strategies for selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment instruments and techniques in counseling. Students will gain skills in the use of clinical interviews, observations, and results of measures of behavior and personality to create treatment plans and monitor client progress. This course meets one of the requirements for the emphasis in Professional Clinical Counseling. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 637 Cognitive and Neuropsychological Assessment for Intervention

Prerequisites, successful completion of CSP 510, EDUC 601, or consent of instructor. This course will introduce students to a comprehensive model of cognitive assessment. Students will also learn to write effective assessment reports and orally present assessment results to parents and teachers. Application of these skills in multicultural settings will be stressed. Fee: $200. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 638 Advanced Assessment for Intervention

Prerequisite, CSP 637 with a grade of B or better. This course builds on the skills and knowledge obtained in CSP 637. The focus of this course is on gathering comprehensive assessment data and using this data to develop academic and behavioral interventions for children and youth with school-related problems. Application of these skills in multicultural settings will be emphasized. Students will practice developing accurate referral questions, interpreting data from a variety of sources to arrive at fair and accurate conclusions, developing effective intervention strategies, and clearly communicating assessment findings. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 639 Advanced Positive Behavioral Supports

Prerequisite, EDUC 602. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to (a) identify and assess problem behavior in school settings, (b) design and implement behavioral interventions, including physiological and pharmacological variables, (c) design and implement comprehensive behavior support plans, (d) monitor and evaluate implementation of behavior support plans, and (e) apply behavioral procedures on a school-wide basis. Students will learn to develop both systems level and individual behavioral intervention plans for persons with serious behavioral problems. 25 hours of fieldwork observing pupils and gathering observation data is required. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 640 Consultation and Collaboration

Corequisite, CSP 620, or 621, or 622, or 623. This is an advanced course in collaborative models of individual and team consultation. Study units and course activities focus on advocating for students by learning to work with individuals, families, community resources, and school based teams to identify problems, design and monitor the efficacy of interventions, and facilitate collaborative problem-solving processes. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 641 Best Practices in School Psychology

Corequisite, CSP 622, or 623. Students will review the knowledge, skills, and standards of the graduate program in school psychology in final preparation for their employment as school psychologists. Students will prepare for the comprehensive examination, complete their program portfolios, and develop a systems change project as part of this course. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 682 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

CSP 714A Counseling and Intervention in Multicultural Settings: Travel Course

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course involves travel to different countries and focuses upon the unique challenges diversity brings to the provision of counseling and psychological services. Students will learn the history, culture, and expectations of the host country and develop the cross-cultural communication skills necessary to effectively work with families of varying cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Students will also explore how issues such as immigration, poverty, sexism, and racism affect counseling practices and the development of effective interventions. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 762 Research Methods in School Psychology

Prerequisites, EDUC 760, 761 with a grade of B or higher, Ph.D. program in education. Completion of at least one EDUC 762 (advanced methods) course is recommended. This course will further students’ understanding of the various methods of inquiry used in the field of school psychology. Students will learn study design and limitations for quantitative and qualitative research in school psychology, and will draft the methods portion of their future dissertation study. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 770 Seminar: Assessment for Intervention

Prerequisite, acceptance to the doctoral program in the College of Educational Studies, or instructor approval. This seminar focuses on research, theories, and practices related to assessment-for-intervention in school-based settings. Students will learn evidence-based assessment practices in the areas of instructional environments, cognitive and neuropsychological functioning, academic skills, and social development. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

CSP 771 Advanced Seminar in Approaches to Prevention and Intervention

Prerequisite, admission to the Ph.D. in education. This seminar provides a theoretical, empirical, and practical foundation for the prevention and treatment of academic and mental health problems in school settings. Student will explore current research and strength-based practices that enhance resiliency and the academic, cognitive, and social emotional competencies of school aged children and youth. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CSP 772 Data-Based Decision Making in School Psychology

Prerequisite, admission to the Ph.D. in education. The purposes of this course are to provide advanced inquiry training in research methods and applications of evidence-based assessment and intervention. Emphases are placed on decision making processes in diagnosis, classification, intervention planning, and the evaluation of outcomes for individual and group interventions. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CSP 773 Systems Based Service Delivery

Prerequisite, admission to the Ph.D. in education. This seminar focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of school-based systems and structures that prevent problems and facilitate positive growth and well being for children. Emphasis is placed on the school psychologist's role in enhancing the capacity of systems to better meet the needs of all learners. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

CSP 774 Seminar: Current Topics in School Psychology

Prerequisite, admission to the Ph.D. in education. The purpose of this seminar is to provide a forum to address the changing world of education and school psychological practice. Emphases will be placed on topics that are on the forefront of current practice and point toward future theory and practice. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

CSP 775A Advanced Internship in School Psychology

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education, emphasis in school psychology. Building upon the students’ prior experiences in school psychology, students develop advanced expertise in a area of school psychology practice as well as the approaches to supervision of specialist level interns. Students will gain a minimum of 750 hours of supervised fieldwork towards the NASP requirement of 1,500 hours at the doctoral training level. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

CSP 775B Advanced Internship in School Psychology

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education, emphasis in school psychology. Building upon the students’ prior experiences in school psychology, students develop advanced expertise in a area of school psychology practice as well as the approaches to supervision of specialist level interns. Students will gain a minimum of 750 hours of supervised fieldwork towards the NASP requirement of 1,500 hours at the doctoral training level. (Offered as needed.) 1½ credits.

Course Descriptions – Education

EDUC 400 Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

(Same as EDUC 500/500B.)

EDUC 400B Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading Bilingual (Spanish) Emphasis

(Same as EDUC 500, 500B.)

EDUC 400P PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

(Same as EDUC 500P.)

EDUC 401 Foundations of Education

(Same as EDUC 503.)

EDUC 402 Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

(Same as EDUC 501.)

EDUC 402P PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

(Same as EDUC 501P.)

EDUC 403 Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy and Learning for Bilingual Settings

(Same as EDUC 502, 502B.)

EDUC 404 Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

(Same as EDUC 504.)

EDUC 404P PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

(Same as EDUC 504P.)

EDUC 424 Secondary Teaching and Learning I

(Same as EDUC 524.)

EDUC 424P PRAXIS: Secondary Teaching and Learning I

(Same as EDUC 524P.)

EDUC 425 Secondary Teaching and Learning II

(Same as EDUC 525.)

EDUC 430 Secondary Subject Matter Methods

(Same as EDUC 530.)

EDUC 430P PRAXIS: Secondary Subject Matter Methods

(Same as EDUC 530P.)

EDUC 432 Content Area Literacy

(Same as EDUC 532.)

EDUC 432P PRAXIS: Content Area Literacy

(Same as EDUC 532P.)

EDUC 434 Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourse and Social Action

(Same as EDUC 634.)

EDUC 435 Education Workshop Series

(Same as EDUC 635.)

EDUC 440 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

(Same as EDUC 540, 540B.)

EDUC 440P PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

(Same as EDUC 540P.)

EDUC 441 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

(Same as EDUC 441B, 541, 541B.)

EDUC 441B Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II: BCLAD

(Same as EDUC 441, 541, 541B.)

EDUC 441P PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

(Same as EDUC 541P.)

EDUC 443 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

(Same as EDUC 542.)

EDUC 446 Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

(Same as EDUC 546.)

EDUC 451 Educational Applications of Technology

(Same as EDUC 551.)

EDUC 470 Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

(Same as EDUC 570.)

EDUC 471 Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

(Same as EDUC 571.)

EDUC 482 Student Teaching Multiple Subjects

(Same as EDUC 582.)

EDUC 483 Student Teaching Single Subjects

(Same as EDUC 583.)

EDUC 499 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of the dean of the College of Educational Studies, approval of petition. An opportunity for specialized study in an area of concern to the student and a certain amount of flexibility in programming for superior students. Not intended as a substitute for an established course. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 500 Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

(Same as EDUC 400/400B.) Prerequisite, multiple subjects, or special education credential, or the related master degree program. Corequisite, EDUC 400P, or 500P. This course explores the components of balanced, comprehensive literacy instruction, and the research basis for the provisions of effective literacy teaching and learning relevant to students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds, as well as students with identified disabilities. Twenty hours of coaching while tutoring one-to-one with an elementary age student ensures the opportunity to bridge theory with practice. Study units are grounded in the principles of the Teacher Performance Expectations and the California Academic Standards for Language Arts. Bilingual emphasis also offered as EDUC 400B/500B. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 500A Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

This course explores the components of a balanced, comprehensive literacy instruction and the research basis for effective literacy teaching and learning relevant to students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds, those with reading and writing difficulties, as well as students with identified disabilities. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 500B Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading Bilingual (Spanish) Emphasis

(Same as EDUC 400/400B.) Prerequisite, multiple subjects bilingual emphasis, or special education credential program. Corequisite, EDUC 400P, or 500P. This course explores the components of balanced, comprehensive literacy instruction, and the research basis for the provisions of effective literacy teaching and learning relevant to students from varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds, as well as students with identified disabilities. Twenty hours of coaching while tutoring one-to-one with an elementary age student ensures the opportunity to bridge theory with practice. Study units are grounded in the principles of the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and the School of Education Vision Tree. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 500P PRAXIS: Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading

(Same as EDUC 400P.) Prerequisite, multiple subjects, or special education credential, or the related master degree program. Corequisite, EDUC 500. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 500, Literacy and Learning: Elementary Reading in the Multiple Subject Credential Program. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 501 Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

(Same as EDUC 402.) Corequisite, EDUC 402P, or 501P. This course explores current theories on language acquisition and the practical applications of theoretical knowledge. Students focus on issues involved in first and second language acquisition and literacy development from a socio-psycholinguistic point of view, including socio-cultural and political factors. It addresses the State ELD standards, assessment, development program options. A minimum of 15 hours of experience in the field is required. (Approved course under AB1059, meets the requirements of SB2042-State Standard 13) (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 501P PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Elementary Students

(Same as EDUC 402P.) Corequisite, EDUC 501. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 501, second language acquisition for elementary students in California schools in the multiple subject and special education credential programs. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 502 Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy and Learning for Bilingual Settings

(Same as EDUC 403, EDUC 502B.) This course is designed specifically for candidates seeking the bilingual emphasis multiple subject credential. It reinforces first and second-language acquisition theory as it relates to diverse alternative bilingual settings in California including dual immersion, developmental/maintenance, and transitional bilingual education. Each of the models is introduced and used for exploration in how they best meet the needs of students in each of these alternatives in California. Policy and practice is reviewed and used as a backdrop for understanding the current controversy in public schools as well as the role of parents. Best practices for developing and reinforcing bilingualism and biliteracy are clearly presented and used for planning and delivering instruction. Students engage in a Spanish language literacy and integrated content project in a designated bilingual program school with a group of students in one of the three models. Spanish fluency is required for the course. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 502B Spanish Language Acquisition, Literacy and Learning for Bilingual Settings

(Same as EDUC 403, 502.)

EDUC 503 Foundations of Education

(Same as EDUC 401.) This is a three-part course designed to provide a foundational understanding of the field of education in three broad but interconnected areas: the intertwined history and philosophy of education, the sociology of education, and the development and learning of children/adolescence as it relates to the K-12 classroom. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 504 Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

(Same as EDUC 404.) Corequisite, EDUC 504P. This course explores current theories on language acquisition and the practical applications of theoretical knowledge as they pertain to students in secondary school. The course focuses on dealing with language acquisition and assessment and literacy development from a socio-psycholinguistic point of view. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 504P PRAXIS: Second Language Acquisition for Secondary Students

(Same as EDUC 404P.) Corequisite, EDUC 504. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 504 second language acquisition for secondary students. A minimum of 15 hours of field experiences is required for this PRAXIS course. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 505 Foundations of Effective Leadership Development

Examines theory and practice of leadership development, with focus on ways to create sustained positive change in individuals and institutions. Topics include: Servant leadership, bureaucracy, classical leadership theories, systems thinking, personal mastery, leaders as teachers, team learning, articulating vision (values, strengths and legacy), emotional intelligence. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 510 Valuing Differences in Society: Travel Course to Cambodia

This course travels to Cambodia. Educators must understand the challenges faced by minority students, and to understand the complexities involved in adapting pedagogical approaches to meet the needs of diverse learners. This immersion course aims to develop an appreciation of what like to be different, both at home and abroad. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 514 Leading as a Way of Serving: Pursuing Your Purpose in Life and Work

Prerequisite, leadership development major, or consent of instructor. Contrasts Western conceptions of leadership with Eastern, Native American, and feminist models. Participants examine the principles and practices of servant leadership at the individual and institutional levels. Leadership theories are supplemented by a servant leadership research case study, experiential exercises, self-assessments, and a required weekend retreat. Fee: $250. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 519 Strategies and Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

This course will provide a knowledge base and opportunities for candidates to develop and prepare to implement instructional programs and support strategies designed to meet the unique needs of learners with mild/moderate disabilities through collaboration with multidisciplinary team members and family, observation, and assessment to develop student profiles of unique strengths and needs, learning characteristics and styles, and behavioral needs for developing effective programs of instructions that are aligned with research based strategies for intervention and support. A minimum of 15 hours of authentic field experience is required for this course. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 524 Secondary Teaching and Learning I

(Same as EDUC 424.) Prerequisite, credential student. Corequisite, EDUC 524P. It is recommended that students take EDUC 504 during the same semester. This course covers the historical background and present functions and organization of the American secondary school, characteristics of and appropriate methods of teaching and learning in the 12-18 age group, methods of assessing student progress, classroom management models, and the creation of instructional environments appropriate for the development of language and content literacy in the multicultural, multiethnic, and multilingual classroom. Guided by the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs), students will 1) create a long-range curriculum plan incorporating integrated or thematic teaching/learning and other SDAIE strategies founded upon the need for students to be social and communicative in their learning; 2) acquire the ability to thoughtfully critique and construct educational assessments in their content area; 3) consider implications for the creation of a positive, safe classroom environment; and, 4) develop a classroom organization and management plan. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 524P PRAXIS: Secondary Teaching and Learning I

(Same as EDUC 424P.) Corequisite, EDUC 524. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 524, secondary teaching and learning I in the single subject credential program. A minimum of 20 hours of field experiences is required for this PRAXIS course. P/NP. (Offered fall semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 525 Secondary Teaching and Learning II

(Same as EDUC 425.) Prerequisite, final semester of the credential program. Corequisite, EDUC 583. This course aims to solidify students’ ability to develop lesson plans that address California content standards in their disciplines; to use several models of assessment practices; to apply various learning theories; to create a positive environment for all learners; and to successfully complete the California Teacher Performance Assessment (CalTPA) examinations. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 530 Secondary Subject Matter Methods

(Same as EDUC 430.) Prerequisite, EDUC 524. Corequisite, EDUC 530P. This course, taught separately for each content area by clinical faculty, is about understanding and experiencing content area instruction. Using the California Content Standards as the base, candidates learn to create constructivist content lesson plans, adapt different models of teaching to meet student needs, plan for interdisciplinary curriculum development, adapt lessons for specially designed academic instruction in English (SCAIE), use multiple measure, including formal and informal academic and language assessments to inform planning, modifications and use of support personnel, and classroom community building. A minimum of 15 hours of field experiences is required for this course, in addition to the field experience in EDUC 530P: PRAXIS. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 530P PRAXIS: Secondary Subject Matter Methods

(Same as EDUC 430P.) Prerequisite, EDUC 524. Corequisite EDUC 530, secondary subject matter methods in the single subject credential program. A minimum of 20 hours of field experiences is required for this PRAXIS course. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 532 Content Area Literacy

(Same as EDUC 432.) Corequisite, EDUC 532P. An introductory course in the study of literacy processes and their relationship to the secondary school curricula and adolescent lives. Areas of focus will include the integration of reading and writing in the content areas, literacy assessment, vocabulary strategies, comprehension strategies, the use of fiction and non-fiction across the curriculum, literacy resources, including online resources, and variations in literacy instruction for students from diverse linguistic and socio-economic backgrounds. (Offered every semester.) 3 credit.

EDUC 532P PRAXIS: Content Area Literacy

(Same as EDUC 432P.) Corequisite, EDUC 532. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 532, content area literacy in the single subject credential program. A minimum of 20 hours of field experiences is required for this PRAXIS course. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 540 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

(Same as EDUC 440, 540B.) Corequisite, EDUC 540P. Bilingual (Spanish) section offered as EDUC 540B. This course provides understanding of the dynamics of California classrooms. The course focuses on creating a democratic learning community while adhering to the California content standards and performance. Students learn about long and short-term planning, models of teaching, and interdisciplinary curriculum development. Students become familiar with ways to increase learning opportunities by catering to diverse learning styles and needs. Students will employ specially designed academic instruction and language assessments to inform planning, learn to make modifications and how to use support personnel. Classroom experiences model instructional strategies and practices from the California State Frameworks and skills required for instruction using the California Standards for Language Arts and History/Social Science. This course will help prepare teacher candidates for the Teaching Performance Assessments. A minimum of 15 hours of field experience is required for each course. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 540B Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I: BCLAD

(Same as EDUC 440, 540.)

EDUC 540P PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I

(Same as EDUC 440P.) Corequisite, EDUC 540, or 540B. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 540, or 540B Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom I in the Multiple Subject Credential Program. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 541 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

(Same as EDUC 441, 441B, 541B.) Prerequisite, EDUC 540. Corequisite, EDUC 541P. Bilingual (Spanish) emphasis section offered as EDUC 541B. This course provide understanding of the dynamics of California classrooms. The course focuses on creating a democratic learning community while adhering to the California content standards and performance. Students learn about long and short-term planning, models of teaching, and interdisciplinary curriculum development. Students become familiar with ways to increase learning opportunities by catering to diverse learning styles and needs. Student will employ specially designed academic and language assessments to inform planning, learn to make modifications and how to use support personnel. Classroom experiences model instructional strategies and practices from the California State Frameworks and skills required for instruction using the California Standards for Math and Science. This course will help prepare teacher candidates for the Teaching Performance Assessments. A minimum of 15 hours of field experience is required for each course. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 541B Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II: BCLAD

(Same as EDUC 441, 441B, 541.)

EDUC 541P PRAXIS: Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II

(Same as EDUC 441P.) Corequisite, EDUC 541, or 541B. This course is the fieldwork component that accompanies EDUC 541, or 541B Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom II in the Multiple Subject Credential Program. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 542 Teaching and Learning in the Culturally Diverse Classroom III

(Same as EDUC 443.) Prerequisite, EDUC 541. Corequisite, EDUC 582. This course serves as the culminating class to accompany the student teaching experience. The course supports candidates in their planning and delivery of instruction and constructivism; using diverse models of teaching; implementing interdisciplinary curriculum development; application and reflection of planning and delivering a thematic unit as well as content lessons in specific disciplines addressing the California Academic Content Standards. The course requires students to write and modify plans for English learners and students with special needs. It prepares students to address the tasks outlined in the Teacher Performance Assessments 3 and 4. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 544 Legal Aspects of Special Education

This course focuses on the evolution of Federal and California State Laws relating to students and adults with disabilities. Areas of emphasis will be IDEA, NCLB, ADA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, California Code of Education, and relevant case law and legal commentary. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 546 Human Development and Wellness in Diverse Classrooms

(Same as EDUC 446.) Prerequisite, admitted to teacher credential program. This course provides teachers with a basic understanding of their role in promoting emotional, physical, and mental health and wellness within their classroom communities. Topics that will be examined include child and adolescent development, typical versus atypical behaviors, learning theory, promoting students' self-esteem and positive outlook, identifying and preventing risk behaviors/conditions (including bullying, suicide, eating disorders, chronic and communicable disease, dating violence, parental abuse/neglect, and illegal/improper drug use), and building a healthy and sustainable classroom culture and community. The course also examines the California Education Codes regarding parents' rights in the areas of sexuality education, laws regarding child abuse reporting and legal responsibilities regarding student safety. EDUC 546 does not include CPR training. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 550 Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

In this course candidates will review the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs), which are elements of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) 2042 teacher preparation program standards. Multiple and single subject credential candidates will examine the following domains: making subject matter comprehensible to students; assessing student learning, engaging, and supporting students in learning; planning instruction and designing learning experiences for students; creating and maintaining effective environments for students; and developing as a professional educator. During the course, multiple and single subject credential candidates will complete the teaching performance assessments (TPAs), which are required by the California commission on teacher credentialing. Successful completion of the TPAs is a credential requirement. P/NP. Fee: $295. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 551 Educational Applications of Technology

(Same as EDUC 451.) An overview of the range of educational applications of computer technology including computer literacy, computer-assisted instruction, telecommunications, electronic grade books, problem solving, teacher utilities, networked learning environments, simulations, word processing, computer-managed instruction, test construction, computer maintenance, the electronic scholar, lesson authoring, schools of the future. Meets the professional clear requirements for classroom application of computers. Some sections of this course are taught online. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 556 Evaluating Teaching Performance Expectations

In this course candidates will review the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs), which are elements of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) 2042 Teacher Preparation Program Standards. Multiple and single subject credential candidates will examine the following domains: making subject matter comprehensible to students; assessing student learning, engaging, and supporting students in learning; planning instruction and designing learning experiences for students; creating and maintaining effective environments for students; developing as a professional educator. During the course, multiple and single subject credential candidates will complete the teaching performance assessments (TPAs), which are required by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Successful completion of the TPAs is a credential requirement. P/NP. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 560 Teaching Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities

This course will provide a knowledge base and opportunities for candidates to develop and prepare to implement instructional programs and support strategies designed to meet the unique needs of learners with moderate/severe disabilities through collaboration with multidisciplinary team members and families, observation, and assessment to develop student profiles of unique strengths and needs, learning characteristics and styles, and behavioral needs for the development of effective programs of instruction aligned with evidence-based strategies for intervention and support. A minimum of 15 hours of authentic field experience is required for this course. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 561 The Profession of Teaching in Special Education

The roles and responsibilities of teaching in special education will be addressed in this class. Specifically, school structures, creating productive and inclusive classrooms, case management, developing purposeful individualized education plans, assessment, curriculum design, lesson planning, time management, organization, and collaborative partnerships will be explored. A minimum of 15 hours of fieldwork are required for this class. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 570 Foundational Issues of Voice, Diversity, Equity and Social Justice

(Same as EDUC 470.) This course was designed to give a foundational backdrop to multicultural education and experiences that sensitize and prepare future teachers for California's diverse public schools. The content includes diverse perspectives and ways to knowing, learning and teaching. It promotes respect for diversity and its many dimensions. Students are encouraged to use this class as a laboratory to uncover assumptions and belief systems that have influenced how people understand those who may seem different. Students are encouraged to share their personal stories and insights. Due to the availability of speakers, current events, and students expressed needs, the course is dynamic and up to date, bringing the class participants and the reality of California schools face to face. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 571 Collaboration for Inclusive Schooling

(Same as EDUC 471.) This course focuses on collaboration, inclusive schooling, and learning characteristics of students with disabilities, working with diverse families of students with disabilities, legal aspects of special education, and becoming an effective change agent in schools. Fifteen hours of authentic experiences in the field will be required. This course meets the mainstreaming requirements for the Multiple/Single Subject Teaching Credentials, the Administrative Services Credential, and satisfies, in part, course requirements for the following programs: Multiple Subjects/Single Subject credential, PPS credential - School Psychology Specialization and Ed.S. Specialist Degree in School Psychology, Special Education Preliminary Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Preliminary Credentials, and the Masters of Arts in Special Education. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 582 Student Teaching Multiple Subjects

(Same as EDUC 482.) Prerequisites, consent of instructor, EDUC 500, 501, 540, 541, 570, 571. Corequisites, EDUC 542, passage of CBEST, CSET, admission to teacher education program, successful completion of constitution course or test requirement, successful completion of RICA, certificate of clearance. This fieldwork experience is designed to be completed during the final term of candidates’ enrollment in the teacher education program and while candidates are concurrently enrolled in EDUC 542. Candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 weeks of all day, everyday teaching in an appropriate K-12 classroom of a master teacher. Student teaching assignments are situated in public schools. Candidates must student teach in a public school in which 25% of the student body is of an ethnicity different from that of the candidate. Candidates are required to assume full teaching responsibilities for a period of at least four weeks. This course may be taken for 6 credits in one semester or taken twice for 3 credits each over two semesters. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3–6 credits.

EDUC 583 Student Teaching Single Subjects

(Same as EDUC 483.) Prerequisites, consent of instructor, EDUC 504, 524, 530, 532, 570, 571. Corequisite, EDUC 525. The candidates must also verify the following: successful completion of CSET, successful completion of the constitution course or test requirement, successful completion of the prerequisite courses (no grade lower than B-), certificate of clearance (TB and Livescan), the application must be signed and approved by the education director. This student teaching, fieldwork experience is to be completed during the final term of a candidate’s enrollment in the teacher education program and while the candidate is concurrently enrolled in EDUC 525. The candidate is required to complete a minimum of eighteen (18) weeks teaching in an appropriate single subject classroom, usually in grades 7-12, of a designated master teacher. The student teaching assignment must include instruction to English learners and it is recommended that the class composition include a minimum of 25% English learners. The assignment must meet the grade level diversity requirement (i.e., two of the following three grade spans: 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12, if grade level diversity has not been met through previous experience). The candidate is required to assume full teaching responsibility for the entire class. This course may be taken for 6 credits in one semester or taken twice for 3 credits each over two semesters. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester). 3–6 credits.

EDUC 590 Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate I

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, passing score on CBEST, admission to teacher credential program, passage of CSET or the appropriate SSAT and PRAXIS subject assessments examinations, successful completion of all course work and other program requirements. The focus of the student teaching placement must be working with students who have mild/moderate disabilities. The university supervisor regularly evaluates candidates. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 591 Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe I

Prerequisites, consent of instructor, passing score on CBEST, admission to teacher credential program, passage of CSET or the appropriate SSAT and PRAXIS subject assessments examinations, successful completion of all course work and other program requirements. The focus of the student teaching placement must be working with students who have moderate/severe disabilities. The university supervisor regularly evaluates candidates. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 592 Student Teaching: Mild/Moderate II

Prerequisites, EDUC 590, consent of instructor/advisor. The focus of the student teaching placement must be working with students who have mild/moderate disabilities. The university supervisor regularly evaluates candidates. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 593 Student Teaching: Moderate/Severe II

Prerequisites, EDUC 591, consent of instructor/advisor. The focus of the student teaching placement must be working with students who have moderate/severe disabilities. The university supervisor regularly evaluates candidates. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 595A The Leader's Journey

Prerequisite, admitted into MLD program. Travel course to London, which focuses on the journey we take when we embrace the challenge of leading and serving. Visits in London will involve a case study approach about leadership decisions that require significant risk, ethical judgment, and courage. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 599 Individual Study

Prerequisites, consent of dean of the College of Educational Studies, approval of petition. Supervised individual study or research on a special problem or in a selected area of education. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 601 Assessment and IEP Development

The course is designed both for special education teachers and school psychologists. Students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to use and communicate assessment results. A variety of individualized assessment and evaluation approaches appropriate for students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on the development of appropriate educational decisions on the basis of a variety of standardized and non-standardized techniques, instruments, and processes that are appropriate to the diverse needs of individual students. Students will learn to (a) identify individual strengths and weaknesses, and (b) make appropriate instructional recommendations both for report writing and for IEP goals and objectives. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 602 Positive Behavioral Supports

This course reviews the history, theory, and implementation of providing positive behavioral supports to children with and without disabilities in a context of ethical interaction and reflective practice. Students will learn a variety of observational and planning tools for construction of authentic and responsive intervention strategies that lead to productive and inclusive learning communities. A minimum of 25 hours of observation and field experience is required for this course. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 604 Scholarly Practitioner: Action Research I

Prerequisite, EDUC 582. The purpose of this course is to support teachers as they conduct research in schools and classrooms. The course is designed to enable participants to carry out an action inquiry, to understand the fundamental principles of action research and to locate the significance of the approach in everyday practice and educational policy. A major part of the course work involves developing an action research project, either on one's own practice or in conjunction with practitioners in the field, whether in schools or in other parts of the community. The course will engage the participants in systematic inquiry into their own practice; framing appropriate questions, gathering and interpreting data, and analyzing data. Students will learn about action research by doing it and by reading examples of action research. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 605 International and Global Education

This course is designed to give educators/leaders a broader and deeper familiarity with today's world, and the tools they need in order to prepare their students to understand the ever-changing world in which they live. It will include three interconnected strands: (1) examination of educational challenges in other countries; (2) current problems and issues that cut across national boundaries; and (3) how global awareness can be incorporated into the organization. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 606 Multiple Literacies for 21st Century Education

This core course explores the area of literacy with an expanded definition and vision of what it means to become literate in the 21st Century. The definition includes reading, writing, listening and speaking about meaningful content with text and images in print, but it is broadened to include other media such as multiple technologies, fine and performing arts, and the environment. Students study multiple forms of becoming literate in increasingly diverse and complex societies. They examine theory, pedagogy and policy in the historic, social, cultural and political contexts of local and global perspectives. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 607 Leadership and Collaboration in Democratic Organizations

Effective leaders practice ethical decision-making, capacity-building, and critical reflection for themselves, others and the system itself. This course examines group dynamics, the change process, and facilitative models that support positive interdependence and worthwhile change. Students will recognize and understand that effective leadership is dependent on a focused collaborative approach that engages all members of the organization in the work of leadership. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 611 Clinical Field Experience in Reading and Writing

Prerequisites, EDUC 612, 615, 616, 618, or consent of instructor. This course provides a culminating experience for assuming a K-12 leadership role in building and sustaining a culture of inquiry around literacy development at a site. Educators investigate how to serve as responsible agents for systemic change. Candidate's inquiry will connect to a site's learning community needs and continue to work on equity with diverse populations, particularly seeking to support those with literacy needs. Students conduct research or develop a thesis on some aspect of literacy education such as multiple literacies, balanced and differentiated programming, formal and informal assessments, powerful curriculum/instruction and civic engagement through critical and creative literacy development from diverse perspectives. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 612 Reading and Language Arts in First and Second Languages

Prerequisite, EDUC 500, or 532. This course is designed to facilitate a critical analysis of the social and political ideology undergirding the development of reading and language arts programs. Students will apply this analysis to planning implementation and evaluation effective classroom curriculum and instruction for all students, enabling them to become active readers, writers, speakers, and listeners. Through field experience, students will have the opportunity to observe and analyze a variety of instructional and intervention models on the school settings, to consider how each embodies perspectives and interest that influence literacy practices and programs. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 614 Scholarly Practitioner: Action Research II

Prerequisite, EDUC 604. The purpose of this course is to continue to support teachers as they conduct, in their schools and classrooms, research that was started in EDUC 604. The course is designed to enable participants to complete an action inquiry, to understand the fundamental principles of action research and to locate the significance of the approach in everyday practice and educational policy. A major part of the course work involves conducting an action research project, either on one's own practice or in conjunction with practitioners in the field, whether in schools or in other parts of the community. The course will engage the participants in systematic inquiry into their own practice; framing appropriate questions, gathering and interpreting data, and analyzing data. Students will learn about action research by doing it and by reading examples of action research. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 615 Assessment and Teaching in Reading and Language Arts

Prerequisite, EDUC 500, or 532. This course is designed to help teachers seeking the reading certificate understand assessment as an integral part of the teaching/learning cycle. Teachers will learn to use multiple, research-based assessments, both formal and informal, to assess students' strengths and needs. They will use assessment findings to then plan effective instruction in a balanced, comprehensive literacy program for both secondary and elementary students. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 616 Literature and Literacy

Prerequisite, EDUC 500, or 532, and consent of instructor. This course is designed to help teachers understand literature as way of knowing, the role of literature in the curriculum, and instructional strategies for using literature effectively. Topics include theories of literature response, criteria for the selection of quality literature across a range of genre, criteria for using literature to meet a range of student needs and interests, e.g. beginning, struggling, successful, and English language learners. Topics will also include issues in using choosing and using multicultural literature, censorship, and the use of technology with regard to literature and reading. Finally students will explore effective strategies for gaining home support for literacy development, especially with regard to home reading. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 618 Language Development in First and Second Languages

Prerequisite, EDUC 500, or 532. This course is designed to introduce students to theory and research in oral and written language development in first and second language acquisition. Students will study the structure of language - phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics - as well as language contextualization discourse, and orthographic systems. Multiple perspectives for the analysis of language acquisition, evaluation of current educational practice, and planning for effective classroom experiences will be addressed. Teachers will understand how to transfer primary reading skills to English language reading skills. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 625 Global Perspectives: Teaching and Learning in a Changing World

(Same as PCST 425.) For teachers, future teachers, and students of international/peace studies who are considering teaching as a career. Students examine developments in the global economy, the global environment, cultural and political systems, and technology. Students also explore ways in which these themes and topics can be incorporated into the K-12 curriculum through the design of appropriate learning activities. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 626 Images of Leadership in Literature and Film

The class will read and analyze novels, plays, and short stories and view films which are set in a variety of institutions (communities, businesses, schools, hospitals, politics, the military, the law, sports), and which show leadership in its many forms or as their primary theme. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 628 Designing Mathematical Instruction and Intervention

This course will provide students with knowledge of mathematical development from early numeracy through computation with whole and rational numbers, as well as how best to support all learners in inclusive classrooms to learn rigorous mathematics with understanding, as called for in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 629 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in graduate studies. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 631 Differentiation for Academically Diverse K-12 Classrooms

Prerequisites, EDUC 401, 500, 532, 618, 654, or consent of instructor. The content of the course enables candidates to increase their knowledge, skills and strategies acquired during their preliminary preparation for English language learners, students with disabilities in the general education classrooms and students in the general education classroom who are at risk. The course will address the development, refinement and application of differentiated instructional strategies and management techniques that enable students to master grade level State-adopted academic content standards at high performance levels. The course content reflects best practices that are characterized by a strong theoretical base as well as accommodate individual student readiness levels, language development levels, interests and learning styles. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 634 Teaching Difficult Histories, Critical Discourse and Social Action

(Same as EDUC 434.) This course is designed to develop the knowledge and skills required to teach about “difficult histories” such as genocides, wars, and terrorism by examining history/social science curriculum and appropriate instructional methods. Students explore ways to teach about the dangers of indifference and the values of participation in a democracy by confronting the complexities of history. Specifically, students will develop their knowledge of a critical discourse educational model including 1) understanding multiple perspectives; 2) contextualizing facts; and, 3) connecting information to K-12 students’ lives for relevancy. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 635 Education Workshop Series

(Same as EDUC 435.) This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore special topics and subjects of special interest. May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 638 Advanced Strategies Mild/Moderate

Application of contemporary theories and literature related to assessment and curriculum development and strategies for instruction of individuals with mild/moderate disabilities. Includes increased emphasis on specific areas of learning disabilities, language disorders, developmental disabilities, autism, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. Information will be at an advanced level, focusing on collaborative strategies and research validated models of instruction. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 644 Aesthetics and Learning: Florence, Italy

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. This course is taught in Florence, Italy. Students explore the catalytic change in intellectual and aesthetic processes, moving from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, the confluence of forces that shaped the creative explosion of the arts in both the sacred and everyday lives of people. They investigate the paradigm shift to a new perspective, one that supports the human potential to create the aesthetic in all modes of living. Students experience art and make connections to their own aesthetic processes. Fee: TBD. (Offered interterm.) 3 credits.

EDUC 648 Instructional Technology: Science and Mathematics

A focused look at methods of using selected Web 2.0 tools and software applications to infuse of technology into the instruction of science and mathematics topics. Provides hands-on experiences and research opportunities in the practical use of technology-based tools for making science and mathematics more accessible to learners in both classroom and online settings. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 649 Educating with Multiple Technologies

A focused look at selected current topics centered on the infusion of technology in the field of education. Provides experiences in the practical use of technology-based tools for teaching and learning, providing a foundation for educators to become adept in the selection, evaluation, and implementation of current technological tools. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 650 Transitions Across the Life Span

This course focuses on the transition of persons with disabilities from home to school settings and from school to employment and adult life. Specific curriculum and teaching methodologies will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on understanding quality of life outcomes, such as job development, home and school life, friendships and social networks, self-determination, choice, and family issues. Adult service agencies, related legislation, and assessment will also be covered. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 652 History and Philosophy of Education

This course will allow practicing educators to dig deeply into the development of formal schooling in western civilization and the United States, tracing both current teaching practices and recent reform efforts back to their roots so as to better understand why schools are the way they are today. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 653 Current Controversies in American Education

This course will provide K-12 educators with a chance to closely examine emerging trends and movements about which there is lively disagreement (e.g., privatization, national standards, voucher plans, Afrocentric curriculum, etc.) (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 654 Introduction to Educational Research

This course is designed to develop students’ knowledge and skills in educational research and inquiry, including qualitative and quantitative research methods, basic statistical analyses, psychometric concepts, critical evaluation of research and its methodology, cross-cultural methods of inquiry, and the ethical standards guiding educational research. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 655 Democracy, Leadership for Education and Social Change

This course examines the relationships among democratic theory, leadership practices, and social change. Specific attention is paid to theories of democracy, the democratic nature of historical and current policy efforts, the contradictions and dilemmas of leadership and how they might influence social change. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 656 Seminar in Learning Theory

It is recommended that MAT candidates complete their teaching credential before enrolling in this course. Students study various learning theories and their implications for instruction. Students also examine the areas of human learning, human exceptionalities; and the cognitive, affective, and biological basis of behavior; and developmental psychology, including those areas germane to pupils with special as well as regular educational needs. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 657 Seminar in Comparative Education

An introduction to educational philosophies, methods, patterns of control, financing, organization and relationship of these factors with the larger society in selected countries of the world, including the United States. Comparison and a comprehensive social science methodology is emphasized. Students examine historical, political, economic and social factors. Systems compared are drawn from all regions of the world. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 658 Seminar in the Social Foundations of Education

This course will give a sociological and historical view of schooling as an institution. The American educational system will be studied as a reflection of the society it serves. By studying schools, we can learn something about ourselves as a people and, by studying our society, we can come to understand our system of schooling--how it developed and something of its current dilemmas and ethical problems. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 659 Seminar in Curriculum Studies

Historical, philosophical, and sociopolitical influences on the curriculum of American public schooling are examined. Curriculum design and evaluation strategies will be considered. The role of teachers and educational support staff in curriculum decision-making, and their potential role as leaders of educational change, are included. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 660 Advanced Strategies Moderate/Severe

Application of contemporary theories and literature related to curriculum development and strategies for instruction of individuals with moderate/severe disabilities. This includes increased emphasis upon specific areas of severe disabilities such as severe/profound intellectual disabilities, multiple disabilities, deaf/blind, physical disabilities, severe emotional disturbance, and autism. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 661 Understanding Conflict

Conflict is an inevitable phenomenon in most settings of our lives—personal, professional, and cultural. This course offers prominent perspectives, knowledge, discussions, and research on conflict. Students will explore, examine, and develop ways to better understand and negotiate conflict. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 662 Creative Inquiry/Self Design

Creative Inquiry/Self Design supports MAE/MLD students in developing expertise in the research and practice in an area of knowledge within leadership development. Students develop inquiry skills to design a creative a inquiry project aimed at transforming leadership in organizations, communities, and workplace settings. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 678 Curriculum and Foundations Capstone Course

Prerequisites, EDUC 654, 655, 656, 657, 658, 659, and two of the following, EDUC 570, 571, 625, 626, 634, 652, 653. The MAE degree with an emphasis in Curriculum and Foundations culminates in a capstone project which requires the candidate to demonstrate mastery of program objectives at a high level of excellence. Each student will design a project which is particularly suited to his or her professional interests and development. Preliminary work on the project will begin with the conceptualization and design phase during the first semester of the program, while the student is enrolled in EDUC 654 Research and Evaluation. Additional segments of the project may be completed within the requirements of other core or emphasis courses when appropriate. It is expected that by the time the student enrolls in EDUC 698, he or she will be ready to complete the remaining work on the project and present it to a panel of peers and faculty during the last month of the semester. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 681 Management of Personnel, Resources and Operations

This course is designed around the policies and procedures of human, fiscal, business, and technology management in public schools. Effective oversight of daily operations and personnel administration provide the foundation in establishing a safe, productive, and fiscally sound educational environment. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 682 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 683 Supervision of Instruction and Assessment

Students study various theoretical paradigms and the historical content of teaching as well as multiple styles of learning. Assessment models are reviewed as they relate to current policies and standards. Students construct alternative models to current practices in the supervision of instruction. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 686 Legal and Financial Aspects of Education

Students examine the current legal framework of American schooling including common law, federal and state law, court decisions, and county counsel and attorney general rulings. The course also covers school finance, sources and types of funding, budgetary procedures at the site and district level, and political issues connected with school finance. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 687 Leadership and Organizational Development

The purpose of an educational organization, such as a school, is for people to join together to create good work that results in powerful learning for all children. This course covers group dynamics, the change process and facilitative leadership models that support positive interdependence and worthwhile change. Effective leaders practice ethical decision-making, capacity-building, and critical reflection for themselves, others and democratic communities of learners. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 688 Leadership for Diversity, Equity and Community

To examine principles of organizational equity, diversity and their implementation in educational settings. Students examine personal and collective biases regarding: race, gender, class, sexual orientation, ability, age, culture, language and religion. Through coursework and fieldwork, they learn to build leadership capacity to ensure academic and social equity for all learners of the organizations community. (Offered every year). 3 credits.

EDUC 690 Professional Induction Planning and Assessment

Prerequisite, educational specialist credential mild/moderate or moderate/severe. This course is intended for students in the Chapman University Professional Level II Education Specialist Credential Program. Candidates will critically plan and assess their knowledge and skills as they relate to their Professional Induction Plan, their chosen expertise area of specialization, and develop a comprehensive professional development plan. This course will allow the candidate to integrate her/his knowledge into a unified understanding of the professional field of special education. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 3-6 credits.

EDUC 691 Supported/Directed Field Work

Prerequisites, admission to the educational leadership and administration program, completion of other requirements in the credential. This class should be taken near the end of the program. Students perform field practice in education administration for at least 100 hours. (This will include field work hours accrued in other administrative credential courses.) They will acquire a working knowledge of duties and problems of education administrators or supervisors; students will observe and apply principles taught in leadership/administration courses as outlined in CTC standards. Course may be repeated for credit in separate semester with approval from department. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 698 Education Thesis/Project

Prerequisites, 24 graduate credits in education and/or completion of a teacher credential program; and complete Thesis/Project Approval Form, consent of instructor. EDUC 698 is required course work required for the MAT advanced core. This course focuses on student's development of a formal master's thesis or field-based project, and the skills to complete this work in adherence to the conventions of educational scholarship. Continuous enrollment required until completion of thesis/project. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 698A Education Thesis Project: Thesis Completion

Prerequisites, 3 credits of EDUC 698, consent of instructor. EDUC 698A is required for candidates working to complete their masters thesis if they are not enrolled in any other MAT electives. This course will fulfill the requirement to maintain continuous enrollment through completion of the masters and allow access to university research resources needed to complete the thesis/project. Continuous enrollment required until completion of thesis/project. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 699 Individual Study

Supervised individual study or research with respect to a specific topic or problem dealing with education. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 705 Moral and Ethical Leadership

A seminar cohort group will study the knowledge necessary for an ethical leadership role in order to build and sustain positive moral cultures in educational settings. The focus will be upon identifying our own ethical beliefs and then recognizing ethical issues and dilemmas in praxis. Students will learn how moral agency works in developing democratic personhood and democratic communities. The big ideas, gleaned from major theories, will inform participants as they deal with the authentic problems and challenges of ethical decision-making in their administrative practices. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 706 Leading Organizational Transformation: Theory and Practice

A systems perspective on the leadership challenges of guiding organizational transformation. Topics include: Evolving workplace practices (telecommuting, virtual-teaming), dysfunctions of bureaucracy, images of the healthy organization, managing transitions, team development, leadership resilience and adaptivity, personal mastery, mental models, inspiring shared vision, appreciative inquiry, deep change. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 707 Leading from Within: Theory and Foundations of Leadership

Considers the self as a foundation for leadership development and practice. Reviews classical and contemporary leadership theories, culminating in development of a personal philosophy of leadership. Topics include: Being and doing; emotional intelligence; understanding yourself and others (temperament, interaction style), integrity, strengths, values, servant leadership. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 708 Change: Politics, Policy, and Advocacy

Examines role of leader as change agent, contrasting formal authority and social influence. Studies organizations as political entities; subject to, and shaping public policy. Topics include: Planned change, effective advocacy, power, influence, formal/informal systems, organizations as instruments of social control and/or social change, organizational culture. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 712 Educational Change

A seminar cohort group will examine the differing perspectives, strategies, and principles that have influenced educational change in the relation to the current strategies of comprehensive school restructuring. The big ideas gleaned from the investigation will assist participants in their understanding of ethical challenges in today's democratic society. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 717 Organization, Culture and Community

A seminar cohort group will construct the knowledge necessary for an organizational leadership role to build and sustain positive collaborative cultured in educational settings. The focus will be upon understanding the diverse constituencies that compose the ecology of the school and how to get such groups to work together, both interdependently and intergratively, for the common good of a democratic community. The big ideas, gleaned from theory, will inform participants as they deal with the authentic problems and challenges of community-building in their administrative practices. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 722 Special Topics in Multicultural Education: Cambodia Travel Course

This course travels to Cambodia. Educators must understand the challenges faced by minority students, and to understand the complexities involved in adapting pedagogical approaches to meet the needs of diverse learners. This immersion course aims to develop an appreciation of what like to be different, both at home and abroad. Fee: TBD. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 729 Experimental Course

This course is designed to provide additional opportunities to explore experimental areas and subjects of special interest in the doctoral program. Repeatable if course topic is different. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 750 Professional Productivity in Education

This foundational course explores the issue of professional productivity in education including responsibilities such as writing scholarly publications (journal articles, books, chapters); making professional presentations at state, national, and international professional conferences and before school boards, and state and federal governing bodies; developing course syllabi for university courses; grant proposal writing; and applying for Institutional Review Board approval to conduct research. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 751 Theories Framing Inquiry

This course develops an understanding of the philosophies upon which different research paradigms or epistemologies are founded, particularly positivism, post-positivism, realism, neo-realism, interpretivism, phenomenology, hermeneutics, narrative orientations, critical theory, and postmodernism. Included within the course is grounding in the first stage of the research process, a thorough understanding of the art of analyzing the literature, and articulating writing as the construction of knowledge. (Offered spring semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 752 Critical Historical Discourses: Challenging Orthodoxies

Prerequisite, good standing Ph.D. program in education. This course examines the historical discourse of U. S. education through a critical lens that views history as fluid, dynamic, shifting, nonlinear, and socially constructed. The narrative of educational history and the interpretation of that history within the context of present history are emphasized. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 753 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. The course provides an overview of the philosophical and historical foundations of US education. This contextual grounding provides the student with a heuristic frame within which to situate other coursework encountered in the Ph.D. program. Emphasis will be placed on appropriate uses of primary and secondary sources. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 760 Quantitative Approaches to Inquiry

Prerequisite, EDUC 751. An examination and application of widely used parametric and nonparametric statistical methods in the design and analysis of education research. Experimental and quasi-experimental designs will be presented and analyzed for their suitability to various research questions. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, survey research, analysis of clinical trials, treatment outcome designs, matched pairs and crossover designs, and statistical tests involving various data distributions. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 761 Qualitative Approaches to Inquiry

Prerequisites, EDUC 750, 751. This is an intensive course in the use of field-based and general qualitative research methods in the social study of education. The aim of the course is to help participants acquire skill and gain experience in using a wide range of methodological and analytical research techniques. The emphasis of the course is on the collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of qualitative data. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 762 Special Topics in Advanced Research Methods

Prerequisite, EDUC 760, or 761. This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and understanding of advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods of inquiry. The focus of the course will vary and will include special topics in qualitative and quantitative research. (Offered every semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 764 Dissertation Research Planning

Prerequisites, EDUC 762, consent of instructor. This course facilitates the development of a dissertation proposal prior to enrolling in Dissertation Research (EDUC 799). The course familiarizes the Ph.D. candidate with the process of developing the dissertation once the proposal has been accepted. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 770 Seminar in Disability Studies

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course will examine and analyze how disability is defined and represented in our society. Disability will be explored as a social, linguistic, physiological, cultural, economic, and political phenomenon. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 771 Seminar in Educational Change: Theories, Models, and Challenges

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course examines the history, research, and theory of educational change efforts in the United States during the past 50 years and provides students with tools that can be used in the analysis of contemporary and future efforts aimed at bringing about improvement in the schools of the nation. It culminates in a case study analysis of a change effort at either the macro (federal or state) or micro (school district or school site) level, which could constitute the early stage of a dissertation study. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 772 International Perspectives on Disability

Prerequisites, EDUC 750, 770, or consent of instructor, and Ph.D. program in education. This course examines disability related issues from an international lens. Specifically, issues such as cultural construction of disability, participation in inclusive and exclusive communities, disability related declarations, laws and policy development, organizations, educational practices, and international partnerships and collaborative projects are explored. Candidates are encouraged to establish relationships with a variety of international disability related public and private organizations in this course. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 773 Seminar in the Neurobiological Basis of Learning

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course will examine and analyze how disability is defined and represented from a neurobiological and neuropsychological perspective. Disability will be explored using the neuro-anatomical correlates of anatomy, physiology, difference and disorder. Cognitive, behavioral, and physical disability will be explored in an interdisciplinary approach utilizing lecture, guest speakers, field observation and experience in medical and educational settings. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 774 The Art and Science of Teaching in Higher Education

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course examines the responsibilities, challenges, and realities of teaching in the academy as well as critical issues facing colleges and universities and strategies for addressing these issues. Particular attention is paid to pedagogy that facilitates learning and the development of socially conscious, ethical, and reflective practitioners, through critical exploration and diverse styles of discourse. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 775 Supervision and Mentoring in Higher Education

Prerequisite, EDUC 774. This course provides students with structured opportunities to co-teach or teach a course under the direct supervision of a faculty member in the College of Educational Studies or supervise students in fieldwork placements. May be repeated up to 3 terms. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 776 Current Controversies in Disability Studies

Prerequisites, EDUC 750, Ph.D. program in education. This course will identify and examine current issues, controversies, trends, and emerging theory and practice in the field of disability and the implications these have for the field, educational leaders and the people they serve, and other stakeholders. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 777 Seminar on Families, Schools, and Community Support

Prerequisite, Ph.D. in program education. Drawing upon the perspectives of families, schools, and the general culture, this course will explore the multiple intersections of family and disability history, educational issues, and personal perspectives This course will focus on the relationships between educators (and other professionals) and families of children with disabilities. We will examine the current research on building relationships that work collaboratively to increase the capacity of families and schools to support inclusive approaches to education and community participation for all students. Throughout the course, we will also discuss how the growing diversity of families (e.g., structure, race, cultural heritage and values) affects the issues of home-school interactions. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 778 Seminar in History of Disability Studies

This course will use the history of disability and special education to explore how disability studies develops a critical and interdisciplinary framework within which to interpret the meanings of disability in American culture. The main purpose of the course is to provide a historical context for approaching contemporary issues in the education and support of people with disabilities and their families. A secondary purpose of the course is to familiarize students with methods for the retrieval and critical interpretation of primary historical source material. The course will draw upon both the intellectual and social history of disability. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 779 Curriculum Theory

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course advances the understanding of contemporary theoretical underpinnings of curriculum. This course explores the nature of curriculum theory, differentiates curriculum theory from curriculum planning, contextualizes curriculum theory within historical boundaries, and explores alternative models of curriculum theory. (Offered fall semester.) 3 credits.

EDUC 780 Critical Pedagogies in Curriculum

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. Critical pedagogy takes as a central concern the issue of power in the teaching and learning context. This course focuses on how and in whose interests knowledge is produced and 'passed on' and views the ideal aims of education as emancipatory through the lenses of major critical theorists. The focus is on social injustice and how to transform inequitable, undemocratic, or oppressive institutions and social relations. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 781 Curriculum, Culture and Politics

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course focuses on the contemporary issues, trends, and research findings in Curriculum Studies. A major goal of this course is to stimulate thoughtful practice about and engage in politically sensitive curriculum inquiry. Through our various readings, we will explore ways in which the metaphorical ways of expressing the life of the mind have occupied the theories of curricularists for half a decade. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 782 Socially Justice Ideology and Democratic Education

Prerequisites, EDUC 750, 751, 779. This course examines various approaches to conceptualizing, interpreting, and operationalizing social justice. The course will review the historical development of the concept of social justice in an inter-disciplinary manner. Particular attention will be given to the ways institutions, such as higher education and other traditions have theorized and operationalized social justice, including a global perspective. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 783 Advanced Comparative Analysis of Educational Systems

Prerequisites, EDUC 750, 751, Ph.D. program in education. This course builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the Inquiry Core, by taking as its focus a critical examination of the theories and methodologies commonly used in the field of comparative education. Applying these theories and methodologies to the critical analysis of educational problems and ways that they have been solved in other nations provides the basis for a fresh approach to policymaking and reform in the U.S. Both developed and developing nations will be examined in terms of the critical issues facing their systems of schooling. This course can be linked to a semester of study and research in another country, leading to further advanced work in comparative education. The course project - a carefully developed research design - may also serve as the first step in a dissertation proposal for those students who become interested in comparative education as their area of specialization within the CCS emphasis. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 784 Current Controversies in Education: Cultural and Curricular Studies

Prerequisite, Ph.D. program in education. This course will identify and examine current issues, trends, controversies, and emerging theory and practice in the field of cultural and curriculum studies and the implications these have for the field, for educational leaders, for the people they serve, and for other stakeholders. (Offered every year.) 3 credits.

EDUC 785 Seminar in Cultural and Curricular Studies

Prerequisite, good standing in Ph.D. in Education program. This course examines the intersectionalities between and among cultural and curricular issues within the field of education. Course content is dependent upon the focus of both the instructor and the students. This focus is deeply integrated with the student’s dissertation research, adding to the substantial scholarship in particular fields. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 3 credits.

EDUC 789 Individual Study

This course will be an independent research project conducted by a Ph.D. student under the supervision of a CES faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.) 1–3 credits.

EDUC 793 Selected Topics in Dissertation Research

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Corequisite, EDUC 799. This is a series of one-unit classes in specialized subjects while students are conducting their dissertation research. Topics include, but are not limited to: literature reviews, research methodologies, validity and reliability, post hoc data analyses, data displays, sampling error, dissertation narrative preparation, preparation for publication, and selected problems in dissertation research. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1 credit.

EDUC 797 Preparing for the Ph.D. in Education Dissertation

Prerequisite, completion of Ph.D. program classes. Taken by students who have finished classes but are not ready to begin dissertation research. EDUC 797 can be taken up to two consecutive semesters, after which EDUC 799 is required. Fee: $150. (Offered every semester.) 0 credits.

EDUC 799 Dissertation Research

Prerequisite, advancement to candidacy in the Ph.D. program in education. This independent research study culminates in doctoral dissertation. 10 credits taken in two consecutive semesters, 5 credits per semester. If after 10 credits the dissertation is not completed, students must remain enrolled by taking 1 credit of EDUC 799 per term for up to 2 terms. P/NP. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–5 credits.

Course Descriptions – Leadership Studies

LEAD 682 Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Students engage in independent, faculty-mentored scholarly research/creative activity in their discipline which develops fundamentally novel knowledge, content, and/or data. Topics or projects are chosen after discussions between student and instructor who agree upon objective and scope. P/NP or letter grade option with consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. (Offered every semester.) 1–3 credits.