solar panels
solar panels

» Energy Efficiency on the Main Campus

This chapter of the 2015 Audit focuses on Chapman University’s monthly energy consumption on the main campus and projects future consumption with the new construction of the Musco Center for the Arts and Center for Science and Technology. It is important for the university to evaluate methods of optimizing demands in the summer and winter months, such that buildings maintain efficiency with future building construction and reduce energy bills for each fiscal year. Read more recommendations for energy efficiency on main campus in Chapter 1 of the audit, written by Jennifer Bowen.

  • Monthly Energy Usage
  • Temperature Adjustments
  • Battery Storage
  • Solar Energy
  • In order for the university to reduce seasonal and base load, the monthly distribution of electricity and natural gas consumption must be evaluated.

    graph  
    • Seasonal loads of energy consumption are sources that change demand based on outside weather and building operation schedule.
    • These sources of energy include space heating and air conditioning.
    • Together these sources use approximately 19% of electricity and 85% of natural gas consumption.
    • The average total cost of electricity for the summer months from June to September is $204,000 per month, while that for the winter months is $104,000 per month.

    • Minimizing electricity usage for air conditioning during the summer months would significantly impact the monthly electricity bill.
    graph

      
    • The average total cost of electricity for the summer months from June to September is $204,000 per month, while that for the winter months is $104,000 per month.
    • Minimizing electricity usage for air conditioning during the summer months would significantly impact the monthly electricity bill.
  • It is recommended the university increase cooling temperatures by 4 ºF in the summer months and decrease warming temperatures by 2 ºF in the winter months.

    graph

    • Increasing indoor cooling temperatures to 76 ºF during the summer months (April – September) would save the university $82,584 each year.
    • Decreasing indoor heating temperatures to 66 ºF during the winter months (October – March) would save the university $28,210 each year.
    • These temperature adjustments would notably reduce the seasonal load and the subsequent total energy cost during the summer months.
  • Battery storage is one method of reducing peak demand during high consuming hours of the day, which can have significant money saving impacts. Shown in the figure is the Stem Solutions Energy System, an example of battery storage. It uses strategic energy storage to reduce peak energy consumption by buildings. 

    computers

    • Battery storage may be used to consume electricity during off-peak hours of the day, store electricity, and power academic buildings during peak hours.
    • The peak demand or highest usage during a 15-minute interval from the billing month is between the hours of 1 p.m. and 5 p.m.
    • The installation of the Stem Energy System in Hashinger Science Center could cover the electricity redistribution to all the main campus buildings.
    • This energy conservation strategy would save the university approximately $79,781 in the first year and $979,212 over ten years.
  • Installation of solar panels on Argyros Forum, Leatherby Library, and Hutton Sports Center would save the university approximately $65,438 per fiscal year. The figure below shows a sample of which buildings on Chapman's main campus could have panels on their roof.

    map

    • Argyros Forum would have a $26,514 net savings.
    • Leatherby Library would have a $15,043 net savings.
    • Hutton Sports Center would have a $23,881 net savings.