» Language and Communication

+ - Arabic Studies

Global View: The Arabic Studies Cluster is designed to advance Chapman's mission of providing students with a personalized education of distinction that leads to inquiring, ethical, and productive lives as global citizens.

The Arabic language represents the cultural context of a major world civilization with historical influence on a number of significant world languages and sciences while continuing to maintain contemporary interest.

Focus: The Arabic Cluster provides students the opportunity to gain a foundation of the Arabic language within its broader context of rich history, literature and culture of the Arab World and other nations where the Arabic language plays a major societal role. Students are exposed to several manifestation of the Arabic Culture such as food, music, film, poetry and social customs.

Cluster Coordinator/email:  Chair, Department of World Languages and Cultures, and Professor of Languages, Dr. John Boitano

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors

Courses: Take two classes from Segment I, ARAB 301 (Segment II), and one class from Segment III.

Segment I: Students are required to take two of the following classes:
ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic I
ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic II [ARAB 101]
ARAB 202: Intermediate Arabic II [ARAB 201, or consent of instructor]
ARAB 299: Independent Study [freshman or sophomore standing only and consent of instructor]

Segment II: Students are required to take Arabic 301-Advanced Arabic
ARAB 301: The Language and Culture of the Arab World: Contemporary Perspective [ARAB 201, or equivalent proficiency, or consent of instructor.]

Segment III: Students are required to take one of the following classes:
ARAB 399: Independent Study
HIST 304: The Ancient Mediterranean World
(cross listed with REL 304)
HIST 363: The Arab World: Colonialism to Revolution (cross listed with POSC 363)
POSC 326: Politics of the Contemporary Middle East (cross listed with HIST 325)
POSC 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross-listed as PCST 353)
POSC 358: Islam and the West (cross listed with PCST 358 and REL 358)
REL 303: Readings in Qur'an and Hadith

The following courses may count when they contain a substantial Arabic Studies component, and they must have the cluster coordinator's approval:
HIST 399: Individual Study and Research (related topic to be approved by cluster coordinator)
POSC 399: Individual Study and Research (related topic to be approved by cluster coordinator)

+ - Chinese Studies

Focus: The Chinese Cluster provides students with the opportunity to gain a foundation in the Chinese language within its broader context of rich history, literature, and culture of the Chinese-speaking World as well as other nations where the Chinese language plays a major societal role. Students are exposed to several manifestations of Chinese Culture such as food, music, film, and social customs. The goal of this cluster is to enrich students with a better understanding of Chinese culture and Chinese language.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Instructor of Languages, I-Ting Chao 

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must complete three courses from Section I and one course from section II.

Section I (take 3 of the following courses)
CHIN 201: Intermediate Chinese I  [CHIN 102, or equivalent, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
CHIN 202: Intermediate Chinese II [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
CHIN 301: Chinese Culture and Society [CHIN 202, or consent of instructor]
CHIN 347: Business Chinese [CHIN 201, or consent of instructor] 


Section II (take 1 of the following courses)
ART 374: Change and Exchange in the Contemporary Arts of China, Korea and Japan
FS 443A: Asian Cinema
 [FTV 140, and FS 244, or 245]
HIST 352: Chinese Civilization
POSC 324: Asian Politics

REL 336: Buddhism
SOC 326: Mind, Self, and Society in Tibetan Buddhism

+ - The French/Francophone Studies

Focus: Promotes the interdisciplinary study of the rich histories, literatures, and cultures of the French-speaking world.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of World Languages and Cultures, and Professor of Languages, Dr. John Boitano

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in French

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

ART 461: 19th and 20th Century French Art (Cannes)
FREN 201: Intermediate French I [FREN 102]
FREN 202: Intermediate French II  [FREN 201]
FREN 323: French Popular Music: A Mirror of Society [FREN 201]
FREN 340: Cuisine in French Literature and Film [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 341: Literary and Cinematographic Images of the French Past: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 348: Francophone Literatures of the World [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 349: French Theatre Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 350: French Poetry Across the Ages [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 351: French Writers of the Holocaust [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 352: French Writers of the Nouveau Roman (New Novel) [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 353: Topics in Historical Tours: Paris, A Literary History [FREN 201, or consent of instructor] (cross listed with HIST 346H)
FREN 354: French Opera in the Time of the Sun King: The “Libertti” of Quinault and Music of Lully [FREN 201, or consent of instructor] (cross listed with MUS 354)
FREN 355: Memories of World War II in French Films [FREN 201]
FREN 365: Of Avatars and Apes: The Supernatural and Science in French Fiction [FREN 201]
FREN 375: French Literature [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 378: French Civilization [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 387:Remakes and Adaptations in Films: From France to Hollywood [FREN 201]
FREN 389: The French Philosopher and the French Enlightenment [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FTV 311: Cinema Francais/French Cinema (Cannes)
POSC 303: La Vie Politique en France/French Political Life (Cannes)
SOC 309: La Societe Francaise/French Society (Cannes)
TH 310: Expression Theatrale/Acting: Theatrical Expression (Cannes)

+ - Germanic Studies

Focus: This cluster affords students the opportunity to acquire a foundation in the German language as well as a broad understanding of the history, culture, and literature of the German-speaking nations.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Professor of Languages, Dr. Walter Tschacher

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in German.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

GER 202: Intermediate German II [GER 201]
GER 341: German Literature in Film [GER 201]
GER 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 345: German Conversation [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 347: Business German [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 375: German Literature [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 378: German Culture and Civilization [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 307)

+ - Italian Studies

Focus: This multidisciplinary cluster allows students to explore the language, culture, film, literature, music, and history of Italy.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Paul and Marybelle Musco Professorship; Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Federico Pacchioni

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must complete a minimum of two courses from Section I. The remaining two courses may be taken from Section I or Section II. REMINDER: Cluster courses must be outside the student's major discipline, and no cluster course can be shared with other GE categories. No courses in the major's primary discipline can be used in the cluster, even if the course is not being used in the major.

Section I
ITAL 201: Intermediate Italian I [ITAL 102] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
ITAL 202: Intermediate Italian II [ITAL 201] (This course cannot be doubled counted in 7LC)
ITAL 301: Conversation and Composition: Regional Culture and Tradition [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 311: A Road Through Time: The Italian Region of Emilia-Romagna [ITAL 201] (Travel Course)
ITAL 340: The History and Culture of Food in Italy [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 342: Advanced Italian: Grammar and Stylistics [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 345: Conversation and Composition: Introduction to Contemporary Society [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 347: Business Italian: Professional Language and Culture [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 349: The Forms of Italian Theatre: History and Practice [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 352: The Fantastic in Italian Literature [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 353: The Short Narrative in Italian Culture: Oral Tradition, Literature, and Cinema [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 375: Masterpieces of Italian Literature [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]
ITAL 385: From Page to Screen: Literature and Film in Italy [ITAL 201, or consent of instructor]

Section II
ART 354: Art, Politics and Murder: 15th and 16th Century Florence and the Medici
ART 355: Art and the Senses: Visual Culture of the Most Serene Republic of Venice in the 15th and 16th Century
ART 356: Princely Art: Renaissance Court Art and Culture of Mantua, Milan, Ferrara and Rome
ART 366: Popes and Princes: Art and Culture in Papal Rome (1400-1700)
ART 379: Rome: The Development of the City (Travel Course)
ART 386: Monarchy, Republic, Empire: Etruscan and Roman Art
FTV 361I: Structure of an International Film Festival [consent of instructore]
HIST 306: The Middle Ages (cross listed with REL 306)
HIST 308: Early Modern Europe
HIST 358: Jewish Life from Napolean to Hitler
HON 321: New Math and the Italian Renaissance
HON 371: The World of Fellini’s Cinema
HON 373: The Puppet Metaphor Across Media
IES 444: Aesthetics and Learning: Florence Italy [consent of instructor] (Travel Course)
ITAL 341: Italian Cinema: Politics, Art and Culture (cross listed with FS 443f)
ITAL 348: The Italian American Experience in Literature and Film (cross listed with HUM 348)
ITAL 387: Italian American Cinema (cross listed with FS 444M)
MUS 301: Music History and Literature I [junior standing, and pass MUS 102, 133 with a "C" or better]

(The following course may count when it contains substantial Italian language component and it must have the cluster coordinator's approval.)
ENGL 449: Literature in Translation (Italian topics only, a special substitution) [Written Inquiry]

+ - Japanese Studies

Focus: This cluster gives students the opportunity to learn about Japanese language, culture, and history.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Assistant Professor of Japanese, Dr. Michael Wood

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Requirements: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students must take at least one language class out of the four courses required to complete this cluster.

ART 265: Exchange and Evolution of Arts in China and Japan
HIST 190:  From the Shaolin Temple to Shonen Manga: Modern East Asia
HIST 260: Asian History and Film
HIST 262: History of the Samurai
HIST 263: Modern Japan
HIST 354: From Samurai to Pokemon: A Social History of Modern Japan
HIST 355: Disease, Power and Sex: Medicine and the Body in East Asia
JPN 101: Elementary Japanese I
JPN 102: Elementary Japanese II [JPN 101]
JPN 201: Intermediate Japanese I [JPN 102, or consent of instructor]
JPN 202: Intermediate Japanese II [JPN 201, or consent of instructor]
JPN 291: Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity [consent of instructor]
JPN 301: Intensive Kanji Study [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 343: Advanced Japanese Grammar and Composition [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 345: Japanese Conversation [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 347: Business Japanese [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 348: Reading Japanese History [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 349: Advanced Japanese: Topics in Literature and Cinema [JPN 343, or consent of instructor]
JPN 491: Student-Faculty Research/Creative Activity [consent of instructor]
JPN 499: Independent Study [consent of instructor, or seniors who have fulfilled advanced courses in Japanese]
REL 336: Buddhism

(The following course may count for this cluster if there is a substantial Japanese language component, and with the cluster coordinator's approval.)
ENG 449: Literature in Translation [written inquiry]

The following courses are no longer available for seletion:
HIST 329.1: Japanese History: Prehistory to the Present
JPN 478: Japanese History and Civilization [JPN 345, or consent of instructor]

+ - Leadership and Communications Studies

Focus: This cluster enables students to develop their understanding of leadership and examine the relationship between leadership and effective communication. Students may explore leadership communications in an area of personal and/or professional interest (for example, political communication, business communication in the global marketplace, conflict and negotiation).

Cluster Coordinator/email: Director, Leadership Studies Program; Associate Professor of Leadership Studies and Education, Dr. Mark Maier

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Communication Studies.

Courses: Students choose four of the following, at least one of which is in Leadership (LEAD) and at least one in Communication Studies (COM).  Up to 2 courses may be drawn from the over 50 “Satellite/Leadership-related” electives listed below. At least two courses must be at the upper division level. (Note: The listing of a course here does not guarantee admission or access to the course. Programs reserve the right to restrict admission to selected courses to students in their programs. Students may NOT apply courses from their major field towards the cluster.)

Leadership courses (Take at least ONE):
LEAD 101: Introduction to Leadership: Principles & Practices
LEAD 301: Theory and Practice of Leadership [leadership minor, or cluster, or consent of instructor, or program coordinator]
LEAD 314: Developing Effective Teams: Understanding Yourself and Others [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 315: The Multi-Cultural Organization: Gender and Diversity in the Workplace [admission to the Leadership Studies Program, or declared cluster in leadership, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 320: Great Leaders: Ethics, Passion & Service [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 380: Service in Action Practicum [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of the instructor]
LEAD 385: Leadership, Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 396: Gender & Leadership [LEAD 101, or 301, or 414, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 429: Experimental Course [LEAD 101, or leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 475: Introduction to Students Affairs in Higher Education [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or integrated educational studies major, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 485: Leadership in the Eye of the Storm: Hurricane Katrina Case Study [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 490: Leadership in Action, Independent Internship
LEAD 495: Special Topics in Leadership & Organization Studies [leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster, or consent of instructor]
LEAD 499: Individual Study [junior standing, consent of instructor, and leadership studies minor, or declared leadership-related cluster]

Communication courses (Take at least ONE):
COM 101: Public Speaking
COM 110: Interpersonal Communication
COM 151: Mass Communication
COM 210B: Theories of Persuasion for Non-Majors
COM 211: Intercultural Communication
COM 310: Business and Professional Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 311: Gender and Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 351: Propaganda and Public Opinion [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 410: Organizational Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 295 with a minimum grade of C]
COM 411: Communication in the Global Workplace [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 211, or consent of instructor]
COM 412: Communication and Workplace Technologies [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 295 with a minimum grade of C.]
COM 415: Communication and Virtual Organizing [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 295 with a minimum grade of C]
COM 440: Conflict, Negotiation and Power [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 110]
COM 452: Political Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
COM 480: Nonverbal Communication [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 295 with a minimum grade of C]
COM 485: Media & Relationships [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-, COM 295 with a minimum grade of C]
COM 493: Ethical Controversies in Communication [COM 100, or consent of instructor]
SCC 100: Introduction to Strategic Corporate Communication
SCC 410: Training and Consulting in the Corporate Context [SCC 100, 200]
SCC 415: Communication and Organizational Change [SCC 100, 200]

Satellite Courses:  Electives in Leadership- and/or Communication-Related Courses
(Any TWO of the following and/or any of the above LEAD and COM/SCC courses, as available):
ANTH 230: Indigenous Rights: Peace and Justice in the Americas (cross listed with ANTH 330)
ANTH 361: Conflict and Social Change in Latin America  (cross listed with PCST 366)
ART 376: Artist as Leaders: Creating Art,Creating Change
BUS 486: Business Across Cultures [ECON 200, 201]
HIST 270: Creating Leadership in African History
HIST 273: Bold Mamams and Audacious Entrepreneurs
HIST 297: the Holocaust in History and Film
HIST 330: America and Its Revolution: Bonfires of Change
HIST 347: Topics in Transformative Encounters
HIST 353: The Atlantic Slave Trade
HIST 359: Elie Wiesel: Life and Works (cross listed with REL 359)
HIST 365: Topics in the Holocaust (cross listed with REL 365)
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
IES 101: Self and Identity
IES 102: The Social Construction of Difference
IES 103: Philosophy of Helping
IES 300: Valuing Differences in American Society
IES 301: Organizations, Ethics and Society
MGMT 360: Human Resources Management [MGMT 316]
MGMT 365: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
MGMT 480: Human Behavior in Organizations [MGMT 316]
MGMT 485: Seminar in Business Consulting [MGMT 316]
PCST 150: Introduction to Peace Studies
PCST 251: Intercultural Conflict and Communication (cross listed with POSC 251)
PCST 253: Mediation and Conflict Resolution (cross listed with PCST 453)
PCST 352: Race and Change in South Africa and the United States (cross listed with POSC 352)
PCST 353: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East (cross listed with POSC 353)
PCST 354: Nonviolent Social Change (cross listed with POSC 354)
PCST 450: Conflict Resolution: Advanced Theory and Practice
PHIL 316: Business and Professional Ethics
PHIL 325: Albert Schweitzer: His Life and Thought (Cross listed with PCST 325 and REL 325)
POSC 304: Citizenship in Theory and Practice
POSC 310: The Presidency
POSC 318: Women and Politics
POSC 332: Democracy and Democratization (cross listed with PCST 332)
POSC 343: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties
POSC 372: Racial and Ethnic Politics in the U.S.
POSC 376: Organization Theory [POSC 110 or consent of instructor]
POSC 486: Political Leadership
REL 217: The Holocaust and Religious Faith
REL 240: Interfaith Leadership, Understanding and Engagement
REL 307: Germany and the Holocaust (cross listed with HIST 307)
REL 322a: Philosophical Theology (cross listed with PHIL 322a)
REL 330: Women and Religion
REL 375: Violence and Nonviolence in Society and Religion
SOC 300: Society, Organizations and Leadership
SOC 306: Social Movements [SOC 101]
SOC 310: Feminist Art-Theory-Power (Same as WMST 310)
SOC 325: Social Change [SOC 101]
SOC 326: Mind, Self and Society in Tibetan Buddhism
SOC 335: Society and the Environment [SOC 101, or ENV 102, or consent of instructor]
SOC 345: Social Psychology [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]
SOC 346: Solving Social Problems in Costa Rica: Globalization and Americanization in a Developing Country [one year of college Spanish language studies or equivalent]
SOC 350: Gender in a Global Perspective [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]
SOC 370: Race and Ethnicity [SOC 101 or consent of instructor]

As of June 1, 2016, the following course is no longer avialable for selection in this cluster:
COM 312: Group Communication
KINE 261: Women in Sport
KINE 262: The Social, Political, and Economic Functions of the Olympics
KINE 386: Leadership in a Team Setting

+ - Linguistics and Bilingualism

Focus: Through this cluster students will achieve an understanding of language and increase their competency in a language other than English. Theoretical principles, analytic techniques, and selected case studies will allow students to recognize linguistic patterns, understand language variation and change, and become aware of the complex interconnections between language, culture, identity, and society. Specialization in a second language will provide valuable insights into the language acquisition process and promote a greater appreciation for cultural diversity.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Pilar Valenzuela

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students are required to take two “Language, Culture and Society” courses and two “Second Language” courses. 

Language, Culture and Society
ENG 271: Introduction to Linguistics  
ENG 372: Language and Ideology
HIST 271: Language, Space and Power in African History
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 441: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]

Second Language
FREN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
FREN 345: Advanced French Conversation and Composition I [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 345: German Conversation [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
JPN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
JPN 345: Japanese Conversation [JPN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II [SPAN 201]
SPAN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 344: Spanish Writing Workshop [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 345: Spanish Conversation [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [any 300-level Spanish course, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 441: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]


+ - The Practice of Language

Focus: This cluster allows students to examine language as trace evidence of communication and relationships, individual and communal, past and present.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Chair, Department of World Languages and Cultures, and Professor of Languages, Dr. John Boitano

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

COM 314: Communication Theory [COM 100, 212 with a minimum grade of B-]
ENG 206: Critical Literacies and Community Writing
ENG 270: Foundations of Rhetorical Studies
ENG 271: Introduction to Linguistics

ENG 347: Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies [ENG 256] (cross listed with SOC 347)
ENG 371: Discourse Analysis
ENG 372: Language and Ideology
FREN 348: Francophone Literatures of the World [FREN 201, or consent of instructor]
GER 375: German Literature [GER 201, or consent of instructor]
HIST 160: Civilizations of Africa - 1800
HIST 342: The History of Everyday Life in America: Cooking, Cleaning, Life and Death
HIST 351: Fire in the Rainforest: Central African History
HIST 365a: Perpetrators, Witnesses, and Rescuers (cross listed with REL 365a)
PCST 253: Mediation and Conflict Resolution
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [any 300-level Spanish course, or consent of instructor]

+ - Spanish Language and Linguistics

Focus: Students will increase their competency in Spanish and achieve a basic understanding of human language. Using Spanish as the main resource, students will identify and describe structural patterns, understand sociolinguistic variation, and become more aware of the complex interconnections between language, culture, identity, and power.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Pilar Valenzuela

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Not open to majors in Spanish

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division. Students take at least one Linguistics course (SPAN 396, SPAN 440, or SPAN 441) is required; more than one is recommended.

SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II [SPAN 201]
SPAN 343: Advanced Grammar and Composition [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 344: Spanish Writing Workshop [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 345: Spanish Conversation [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [successful completion of any 300–level course in Spanish, or consent of instructor]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [any 300-level Spanish course]
SPAN 441: Spanish Phonetics and Phonology [SPAN 202, or consent of instructor]

+ - The Spanish-Speaking World (This cluster is now closed and no longer available for selection)

Focus: This cluster allows students to explore the history, literature, culture, and film of Spanish-speaking communities throughout the world.

Cluster Coordinator/email: Associate Professor of Languages, Dr. Pilar Valenzuela

Important information regarding Cluster completion:

  • No course in the student’s major discipline can be used to satisfy cluster requirements, even if the course is not being used to satisfy major requirements.
  • Course prerequisites appear in brackets in the list below.
  • If a course is restricted to majors only, you may request permission of the instructor or department chair, if space is available and you have met pre-requisites.
  • Courses in the cluster are not guaranteed for availability. Please check the catalog for the semesters in which the course is offered.
  • If you are having problems completing a cluster or finding available courses, please contact Academic Advising and/or the Cluster Coordinator.

Restrictions: Open to all majors.

Courses: Choose four of the following, two of which must be upper division.

COM 411: Communication in the Global Marketplace [COM 211]
ENG 327: Multicultural Literatures of the U.S. [ENG 256]
FS 443d: Advanced Topics in World Cinema: Mexican Film [FTV 140 and either FS 244 or 245]
HIST 372: California History
HIST 258: Latin American History Through Film
HIST 312: History of Spain and Portugal
HIST 396: Mexican History
HUM 316: From Latin America to Los Angeles: Culture and Ways of Life
POSC 327: Latin American Politics
SPAN 375: Literature and Culture of Spain I [SPAN 326]
SPAN 377: Literature and Culture of Latin America I [SPAN 326]
SPAN 396: Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics [300-level Spanish course]
SPAN 397: United States Latino Literatures and Cultures [SPAN 326]
SPAN 440: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Spanish Bilingualism [300-level Spanish course]
SPAN 484: 20th Century Spanish Poetry and Drama: Literary Pictures [SPAN 326]

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